#1
I always write songs in the major scales (A-G). I have never understood why or when you would use the minor scale ever. Whether it be for chord composition (Creating the chords for the entire song) or being the solo for the song. Could someone clear this up for me? Does the minor scale follow the same techniques as the major scale i.e a rock progression is I IV V? Or does that all change?
#2
^ heh, almost all my songs are entirely in minor scales with relative major modulations for a couple of bars from time to time to change up the sound. major = happy, minor = sad. thats basically the way it works.... you would use minor scales when you want a song to have a more sad/melancholy type sound. minor scale is the 6th degree of the major scale, the chords are i,ii dim, III, iv, v, VI, VII. in E it would be, E min, F# dim, G, Amin, Bmin, C, D.
#4
play a G and a B together, then play a G and a Bb together. that's the difference.

you can do all sorts of things with minor chords... for example, play an A minor chord, then play a G major chord, and alternate with whatever pattern you want. then add a C major, and mess around with that. or play an A minor, then a C major, then a D major, then back to A minor or whatever.
#5
Quote by capos_suck
play a G and a B together, then play a G and a Bb together. that's the difference.

you can do all sorts of things with minor chords... for example, play an A minor chord, then play a G major chord, and alternate with whatever pattern you want. then add a C major, and mess around with that. or play an A minor, then a C major, then a D major, then back to A minor or whatever.


My problem isnt with minor chords, it was with understanding the minor scale. There are minor chords in the major scale as well...
#6
well, if you can ask a bit more of a detailed question i can give more of a detailed answer. i gave an explanation of the chords used in E minor above.
#7
Quote by z4twenny
^ heh, almost all my songs are entirely in minor scales with relative major modulations for a couple of bars from time to time to change up the sound. major = happy, minor = sad. thats basically the way it works.... you would use minor scales when you want a song to have a more sad/melancholy type sound. minor scale is the 6th degree of the major scale, the chords are i,ii dim, III, iv, v, VI, VII. in E it would be, E min, F# dim, G, Amin, Bmin, C, D.


Thanks man, in the time since your post I have just been messing around with different progressions in different keys. It sure does make playing a LOT more interesting in a minor key. What do you mean by relative major modulations? Like In C minor scale youd play this:

Cmin Gmin Fmin then throw in like Amaj?

edit**
sorry z4twenny, that post above was not in response to you. You gave me a great answer!
#8
ok in C minor your chords are

C min, Dmin dim, Eb major, F minor, G minor, Ab major, Bb major

the simplest way to figure relative major to minor for beginners is this....

in a minor scale, 2 chords up is the third, its a Major, this is the relative major to that minor scale, IE in C minor, your 3rd is the Eb major, which is C minors relative major

in a major scale just go backwards, if you are in Eb major, count down 2 chords to find its relative minor. which is C minor

another Example in E minor (what i learned minor scales in)

In E minor your root is E minor and it's relative major is G major
much like G majors relative minor, is E minor.