#1
Last night i was reading all my guitar magazines and i came across something about metal in one of the magazines. It was a riff by anthrax.

It was in the key of E minor or G. And it mentioned it had a b2 and a perfect 2nd.

Would that mean in the key of E minor it would alow me to use the chords F5 and F#5 chords in a non chromatic way. And if so in what context.

Thanks in advance.
Last edited by Grunger Aj at Jul 7, 2007,
#2
I tried just playing it as a chord and it sounded like something I've played before. I started out with a basic E minor chord then added F#. It sounds better when you progress and change the F# to a G. I don't know how much help that was. Lol, just experimenting.
#4
Ok. Thanks that wasn't exacly what it asked for but i think that can help me equally thank you. :p
#5
thats weird, ive never heard it called that before
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#6
Wait sorry. I meant a b2 and a perect 2nd.
Last edited by Grunger Aj at Jul 7, 2007,
#7
yeah thats what i thought^, i thought you meant b2...

yeah its not really a formal scale? i think?

1 b2 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1

just a chromatic passing tone, they do that a lot in metal, especially with a b2, theyll use powerchords and just hang out down by the nut to get a low sound
Quote by beadhangingOne
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#9
Quote by Grunger Aj
Last night i was reading all my guitar magazines and i came across something about metal in one of the magazines. It was a riff by anthrax.

It was in the key of E minor or G. And it mentioned it had a b2 and a perfect 2nd.
Your magazine used this term incorrectly. The qualifier Perfect is never used with the intervals of the second, third, sixth, seventh, or their octave extensions (ninth, 10th, etc.). The qualifier Perfect is used only with the Group 1 intervals (unison, fourth, fifth and octave).
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#10
Quote by gpb0216
Your magazine used this term incorrectly. The qualifier Perfect is never used with the intervals of the second, third, sixth, seventh, or their octave extensions (ninth, 10th, etc.). The qualifier Perfect is used only with the Group 1 intervals (unison, fourth, fifth and octave).


Beaten to it. Should be a flat II and a natural II.
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#11
^minor second, major second?
My name is Andy
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#12
^ not really, in both a minor and major scale (for example just B minor or B major) the 2nd interval is the same distance, i believe b2 is the proper term as well.
#13
I disagree, there are five types of intervals, perfect, major, minor, augmented, diminished. In the major scale you have major intervals, and when you flatten a major interval you get a minor interval. I don't think it's about whether or not the interval is found in the minor scale.
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
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#14
Talking about scale degrees we can use II natural, V#, IVb, VIIx, IIIbb. We don't need to call them major, minor, perfect, diminished or augmented because we know the natural interval in the scale.
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#15
I don't think I understand your post, Muphin.
My name is Andy
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Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#16
Quote by Ænimus Prime
I don't think I understand your post, Muphin.


When referring to a scale, in this case the major scale, we can communicate the alteration of the notes of that scale with accidentals. We don't need to use major/minor/perfect/diminished/augmented because we are not comparing two notes, we're talking about the scale degrees.
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#17
Quote by Muphin
When referring to a scale, in this case the major scale, we can communicate the alteration of the notes of that scale with accidentals. We don't need to use major/minor/perfect/diminished/augmented because we are not comparing two notes, we're talking about the scale degrees.

But you are comparing two notes, aren't you?
I always thought that with interval formulae like 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 you're comparing the note to the root. Its describing the intervals that make up the scale.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#18
Quote by Ænimus Prime
But you are comparing two notes, aren't you?
I always thought that with interval formulae like 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 you're comparing the note to the root. Its describing the intervals that make up the scale.


You can construct a major scale with a bunch of major intervals in relation to the tonic. This has been established, so when we're talking about modifying the major scale to, for example, a blues scale, we don't need to take the time to add a minor third, seventh and diminished fifth and then remove the major second, third and major seventh. Instead, you could just easily write the scale:

I IIIb IV Vb V VIIb
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I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

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#19
Quote by Muphin
You can construct a major scale with a bunch of major intervals in relation to the tonic. This has been established, so when we're talking about modifying the major scale to, for example, a blues scale, we don't need to take the time to add a minor third, seventh and diminished fifth and then remove the major second, third and major seventh. Instead, you could just easily write the scale:

I IIIb IV Vb V VIIb

We completely agree on this.

Back to the root of this discussion, what does b2 mean?
When I see b2, I think 'minor second interval'.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#20
Quote by Ænimus Prime
When I see b2, I think 'minor second interval'.
This is the correct interpretation of the symbol b2.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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