#1
Say if wrote an instrumental piece, Does it really matter if the song is " the key of Ab" or " the key of D." I've heard some people say "I think this song sounds better in E" and I get confused cause I thought as long as the intervals are the same the song is the same.

So besides to fit the singers range is their a reason to choose one Key over a another?
#3
Quote by scarlet20
So besides to fit the singers range is their a reason to choose one Key over a another?

All personal preference. They may like the way it sounds better in E, but it's all up to you man. It's your song.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#4
ideally you will never create 'something in Ab,' you will just create something and somewhere in there when youre mixing more stuff into it you realize that it seems to fit Ab pretty well, or that soloing over it sounds best to use Ab.
'87 Fender Strat
Oscar Schmidt Archtop
Laney LC15R
#5
With lots of instruments, it doesn't matter what key it's in, it's going to have the same effect. Guitar though, is an exception, because of all the different positions. Playing something in a certain key can have a major effect on your ability to play a song. If you want something heavy, you'd write your song in E or F or something like that because that's the guitar's lower range. You wouldn't write it in C unless you want to detune. Same thing with chords, if you want to play a 9th chord using a C shape it's not going to make much sense to write your song in A. Not to mention how helpful open strings can be. You can always work around these things, with alternate tunings or using different chord shapes, but you want to go with what's comfortable.
#6
Quote by boardsofcanada
ideally you will never create 'something in Ab,' you will just create something and somewhere in there when youre mixing more stuff into it you realize that it seems to fit Ab pretty well, or that soloing over it sounds best to use Ab.


no, i create stuff in Ab all the time.....
#7
Well, think about it this way: If you are writing something and you intend it to be in C Major, but you never hit the C root, and hit A quite a bit, a musician sitting down and listening would probably think that it's in A minor, even though that wasn't what you intended. In one respect, which notes you hit can determine the key (as far as a listener is concerned). But in another respect, as it's your song, you can make it in whatever key you want.
Gunpowder: FUCKING ROCKS!!!
Quote by The Madcap
[witty set-up]
Gunpowder FUCKING ROCKS!!!!!

Quote by Kensai

Gunpowder you fucking rock!!

Quote by Dirge Humani
Now I can say, with sufficient certainly, that you, Gunpowder...

FUCK ROCKS!
Last edited by Gunpowder at Jul 7, 2007,
#8
Have a look at this small Wiki article on Beethoven and C minor.

You can transpose it to whatever pitch you like, but it'll be down to personal preference, which is what this other person was talking about I'd assume. To me, Bb, C, and Eb resonate well with me, and I often compose in those keys, and I like hearing music with them.
#9
actually different key also give you different feel on play.. whenever I switch from key C to D, it give me more great feel... dont know why..
My Gear:

Guitar : Ibanez RG350EX 400 dollar US
Pick : ernie Ball - half a dollar
Amp : borrowing friend
Pedal : behringer metal pedal

------------------------------------------------------------------------

'I trust no talent'
#10
Of interest why does changing key affect the singing? Ive never asked this in a fair while of singing. Surely Key is just different notes used rather than singing higher? I can sing a song an octave lower or an octave higher. But if i sung in a different key id be sharpening different notes surely?
#11
Quote by RedFez64
Of interest why does changing key affect the singing? Ive never asked this in a fair while of singing. Surely Key is just different notes used rather than singing higher? I can sing a song an octave lower or an octave higher. But if i sung in a different key id be sharpening different notes surely?


It depends how low and high the singer would need to go, and their range. Say, for example, you wrote the song and had the singer sing up to the B above middle C, but he/she can only hit up to the G above mid C, then you might wanna write in a lower key. Stuff like that, I think.
#12
But key only shows the notes used? So Write a piece in C and the singer sings all white keys. But write a piece in D major and any Fs will have to be raised. That doesnt make it higher (aside the Fs) but it will make it different

To my understanding. Im just waiting for the face smashingly obvious answer.
#13
Quote by RedFez64
But key only shows the notes used? So Write a piece in C and the singer sings all white keys. But write a piece in D major and any Fs will have to be raised. That doesnt make it higher (aside the Fs) but it will make it different

To my understanding. Im just waiting for the face smashingly obvious answer.


I was thinking that in changing the key, you're just shifting each note up or down how ever many steps... Am I confused?
#14
It makes it higher because moving from C major to D major every note moves up one tone. That means that any melody is now a tone higher.

The F and C are sharpened because when you raise the E and B in C major by a tone, you get F# and C#, because there is only a semitone between E and F, and B and C.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



Because footstools are cool - UG's Classical Guitarists


PM Marmoseti or Confusius to join
#15
Quote by RedFez64
Of interest why does changing key affect the singing? Ive never asked this in a fair while of singing. Surely Key is just different notes used rather than singing higher? I can sing a song an octave lower or an octave higher. But if i sung in a different key id be sharpening different notes surely?

Try singing "the star spangled banner" in every key,I'm sure you can't because it requires 2 octaves of range. So unless you have 3 octaves of vocal range you have to choose a key in which you can sing it.