#1
Hi!
I've got a jackson dxmg with .009-.042 strings on it. Lately I've wondered if I'd like the sound better with 0.010 strings. Right now I'm considering the Elixir Light or Light-heavy ones.

The question i wanted to ask is:
Is it possible and a wise thing to change the string gauge on a floyd rose? I don't know very much about how floyd rose mechanics work, and I didn't want to take any chances by trying to change the strings before asking some of you people here
#3
Quote by Varkunus
well it will be a pain in the ass and ull have to add some springs


No you don't. You'll have to adjust the spring tension in the back by tightening the screws. If you're interested, this is because heavier gauge string exert more "pull" on the springs, so the tension has to be increased with the strings as well. To maintain a level Floyd-Rose or floating bridge, Spring tension must = String tension, at least approximately.

EDIT: .9 TO .10 Gauge shouldn't require much adjustment, maybe one full turn.
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#4
You don't need to add any springs - three springs will work fine with 10s.

You can change your string gauge if you wish, but you will need to adjust the spring tension to set the bridge back to parallel. You may need to adjust intonation as well. Expect a good half-hour or so setting the bridge height.

If 10s are the most comfortable size for you, then switching gauges will undoubtly be the most intelligent change you could make.
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
#5
The main reason that I'm considering doing this is that I feel i can speed-pick and sweep cleaner, faster and better on my steel string acoustic guitar which has a 12 gauge. Think I'll go to the local shop and see if they have guitars with 10 string gauge on them and try it out.

Thanks for the helpful replies!
#6
That's becuase the thicker strings provide more tactile feedback through the pick when you pluck. The more feedback, the better your mind is able to coordinate its movements.

To accomidate more feedback, I use thicker picks and sharpen the tip instead of installing thicker strings. Give it a try if you'd like.
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
#9
Quote by Bazilisck311

To accomidate more feedback, I use thicker picks and sharpen the tip instead of installing thicker strings. Give it a try if you'd like.


Hm, how do you sharpen the tip? With a knife or a nail filer?
I'll try that though, right now I'm using a Jazz III-pick.
#10
I use Dunlop Tortex 1.44mm (purple) and I sharpened the tip with 800 grit sand paper. I didn't make it razor sharp, I just reduced the profile of the pick edge (skinnier I guess you would say)

With a pick that thick, the opposite may happen. The larger pick provides less feedback as it absorbs more the energy from plucking. I tried out a Jazz III after so much positive feeback from a thread here and found it too thick - I couldn't feel that sharp vibration that I had with my 1.44s sharpened. In your case, you may find thicker strings better to your liking then a thicker pick (if you could get any thicker...)
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer