#1
Well, I'm a beginning Bass player. I literally picked it up two days ago. So far, I've been using a Squier Bass from a starter pack (http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Affinity-Series-P-Bass?sku=510424) that I came upon a long, long, time ago.
And lately I've been considering getting a new, better quality bass. This is simply because I feel that the neck on mine is way too wide, and some nicer pickups would be great. I'll post the links of some models I'm considering, But if any of you can either affirm me, or give me another option (hopefully under or around 400$, at the most?) that would be great.
Model A: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/ESP-F104-Electric-Bass?sku=516771
Model B:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Standard-Jazz-Bass?sku=516042

On a side note, I plan I playing almost anything, from Queens of the Stone Age to the Foo Fighters, from the Red Hot Chili Peppers to Weezer.
Last edited by poetvirgil at Jul 9, 2007,
#2
I'd probably go for the standard Fender Jazz. Hugely versatile and reputable. I can't say I've tried an ESP though.


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#4
+1 to the jazz but wait a while and save your money and get the american model. the s1 switching on it is amazing for all kinds of music.
So it goes.
#5
Try out some basses and see for yourself, i recommend Yamaha's.
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#6
It sounds like you've got GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). It happens to all of us, it's nothing to be worried about. You've been playing for 2 days, and you're already talking about dropping 400 on a new bass? Thats crazy. It might not be the most fun idea, but I strongly recommend you wait. If your bass is a pain to play, take it to a shop and have them set it up for you (to make it as easy to play as possible) it makes learning so much easier. Wait, and if in a few months you are a better bass player, and you can afford to buy a new bass, then go out looking for one. Buying a new bass after less than a few months of playing is never a good idea.
#7
Quote by TheChoristers
It sounds like you've got GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). It happens to all of us, it's nothing to be worried about. You've been playing for 2 days, and you're already talking about dropping 400 on a new bass? Thats crazy. It might not be the most fun idea, but I strongly recommend you wait. If your bass is a pain to play, take it to a shop and have them set it up for you (to make it as easy to play as possible) it makes learning so much easier. Wait, and if in a few months you are a better bass player, and you can afford to buy a new bass, then go out looking for one. Buying a new bass after less than a few months of playing is never a good idea.

Great advice - at two days, two months, even a year, you don't really know what you want to get out of an instrument - you haven't played it long enough to be familiar with your voice on it. I second this advice.
#8
@ TheChoristers:
That's just the thing. My biggest problem with the bass is the neck. Is there some way they could thin it down or would I just need to go the least expensive route in acquiring a whole new neck to play on?
#9
You'll get used to the neck. You've not been playing long and your hands will adjust, as well as your mentality as to needing a new neck.

I swear that you will get used to the thickness of a P neck like I had too- and I have small hands. Or at least give it a go for a few months.
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#10
well, if you are set on buying a new bass after playing for two days, i would go with a yamaha. it has active EQ like the ESP you showed. and is only $350, but i would suggest going to a music store and trying many different models out.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-RBX374-4String-Bass?sku=519038
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#11
If by width you mean that the strings are too far from the fretboard, or that the neck is too thick (too much like a baseball bat, not enough like a ruler); a setup and proper playing technique will fix your problem. If it's too wide in the sense that the E and the G strings are too far apart, not much will help you besides time and playing technique (and by that I mean thumb anchored on the back of the neck, fingers coming down at a sharp angle towards the fretboard). Different brands will have different width necks, but it won't be a big enough deal to make a noticeable difference at this stage in your playing.

When I took up electric guitar, I had loads of musical experience, and I knew what musical style I wanted to play, and what guitar I wanted to get (Jazz archtop). I decided to start with a $50 pawn-shop strat knockoff, and get it setup to be easy to learn on. After owning and playing that for a year and a half, I got a nicer guitar. Resist the urge to purchase, and focus your efforts on playing.
#12
2 days? and you want something better? man be content with what you have for the time being. I couldn't have asked for a better starter bass than my Squier. Besides, at your point, and I'm not poking fun at you, this is really just a generalization, your ears could't tell the difference between your Squier and a nicer bass or your bass with new pickups.
#13
Don't switch a bass after two bloody days.
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race toward an early grave.


Ben Hamelech
#15
Yes.
But don't let this bring you down if you need help with anything, this place is usually very friendly and helpful.
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race toward an early grave.


Ben Hamelech
#17
You have to get used to the neck. That's all. Even if you were playign a guitar with an über-thin neck as your first instrument, you'd still need to get used to it before it became comfortable.

Unless you're unnaturally gifted, the first few weeks (even months in some cases) of playing any instrument are always a struggle. It takes time to get accustomed to your instrument.

My suggestion is to bring the bass in to get a full setup done and get some lighter gauge strings installed. That will ensure that the action is as low as it can be and that the strings aren't too hard to press onto the fretboard. And play that motherfukker for the next year or so. Then look into upgrading to a better instrument. Once you've learned the basics on your existing bass, you'll see a nice rapid improvement in your playing once you move on to a better bass in a year or so. For now, a new bass will do nothing for you and you will fidn it just as frustrating as your existing bass.
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Last edited by Crunchmeister at Jul 9, 2007,
#18
^ It was quite easy for me from the first day, and I don't think I'm unnaturally gifted.
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race toward an early grave.


Ben Hamelech
#19
Quote by BassistGal
^ It was quite easy for me from the first day, and I don't think I'm unnaturally gifted.


I also agree, somewhat, when I made my first choice, I went for a midrange bass, basically all the guys at the stores said, "the midrange stuff will reatin most of its value, and after a while, when you feel like something else, this is a midrange bass! you won't need to upgrade it for a while!"
after a while I still had GAS for stuff, but i was like, **** this I got a fender!

my main point is: its always going to be like that, you're always gonna want something else, and you're just learning, you'll get used to it. I remember my first day, I played like pete wentz, but I grew up by the second day and played more professionally, just keep practicing, I had no teacher, and for the first half year, no books or the like. Just keep going at it and evenually you will realise that that bass FEELS good for you, but the sound is annoying, and you may upgrade into a standard P-bass or something.
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