#1
I just recently picked up guitar and have been plyaing for about 2 weeks now. Usually 1-3 hours a day depending if I want to hang out or not. Im serious about my guitar playing and Ive been asking people around me what I should do at the beginning. My brother just said learn tabs, so I started learning songs. Coming my father who is an experienced musician(40 years of playing drums). He says to just learn scales and study the fretboard.

So Im at a crossroads, learning songs would be fun, but I want to learn guitar correctly. Some of friends have been playing for years, and can only play on tabs, don't know any scales, and lack overall skill. I want to learn the right way, because guitar has become in this last 2 weeks a passion. My dream has always been to write my own music, and improvise. Eventually I would like to join a band, but in order to do that, I need to learn the ways. Ive been learning the C Major scales and chords recently and have been making progress, but really I have no idea what Im doing, and I don't want to end up like my friends. I want to KNOW my guitar and be able to write my own music.

Im also willing to committ more hours, and study what I need to. In bursts depending on the day really. I also have a handle on music theory because I played piano for a good 5 years. I just need your advice as to what I need to do to become the musician Ive always wanted to be.
#2
youve probably heard this a thousand times before, but you should learn the pentatonic scales. also, you can learn songs and scales, theory etc, you don't have to learn only one.
#3
The number one, numero uno largest barrier you'll be facing as a beginner is
purely physical. You'll want to train and practice in such a way that gives you
a good physical foundation for playing more advanced things and facilitates your
continued progress. Most people don't address the physical from the get go and
consequently are always being held back by it. They're trying to build a house on
a rickety foundation.

So what you need is "Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" available from
www.guitarprinciples.com
#4
Quote by edg
The number one, numero uno largest barrier you'll be facing as a beginner is
purely physical. You'll want to train and practice in such a way that gives you
a good physical foundation for playing more advanced things and facilitates your
continued progress. Most people don't address the physical from the get go and
consequently are always being held back by it. They're trying to build a house on
a rickety foundation.

So what you need is "Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" available from
www.guitarprinciples.com


Thanks for the advice, I've skimmed over that site briefly before but Ill look into it more.

Another question, should I possibly look into taking lessons? Or should should I wait till Ive built finger strength?

Quote by edg
youve probably heard this a thousand times before, but you should learn the pentatonic scales. also, you can learn songs and scales, theory etc, you don't have to learn only one.


Thanks for the tip. I understand I can learn all at once, but Im an efficiently use my time, so I was really wondering is learning songs from tabs worth the time? Or should I just practise scales and chords.
Last edited by El_Diablo_0 at Jul 10, 2007,
#5
Quote by El_Diablo_0

Another question, should I possibly look into taking lessons? Or should should I wait till Ive built finger strength?


Lessons have nothing to do with finger strength. A teacher is a good idea. Finding
a really good one is hard. But, you can generally learn something from just about
anyone.
#6
I'm definitely no expert, but I'd say that learnin a song or two from time to time from tabs would be good for you....you wouldn't become dependant on tabs, but being able to play some of your favorite songs (or just riffs) early will help keep you enthusiastic about playing.
#7
I dunno whether I'm just the one. But I love playing scales. I hear all this crap about how people dislike playing scales, putting it off etc etc. But I like learning a scale, getting better then improving the speed. It feels and sounds impressive. Then again, I still get those moments of anger and annoyment when I feel my fingers can't keep up with my brain but that goes away after lots and lots of fun scale practice.
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#8
Talk to the nice folks in the Musician Talk forum. If you want to write and understand music, music theory helps a lot.
#9
Quote by werty22
Talk to the nice folks in the Musician Talk forum. If you want to write and understand music, music theory helps a lot.


Ya, just hang around the MT forum and you will learn tons. There is so much knowledge floating around in that place its almost sickening.

But you could be doing both songs and learning music theory. When i started, I learned theory and played songs at the same time. The theory has obviously helped me cause its theory. Now the songs have helped me too when it comes later down the road for jamming and playing through a cd WITHOUT a tab. You get a feel for a lot more because youve heard a lot of stuff and can translate what you know into what the song is actually like. It helps a lot with the ear and interval training. So just do both. Have fun, but also learn stuff.

Now for that guy who said pentatonic scale, I wouldnt if I were you. So many people get stuck in the pentatonic its not even funny. Learn the major scales like you are doing (the box patterns are the best at this point) and go from there. You are just better off not taking the pentatonic route because its easier for the first year, and really, the major scale makes more sense in the long run. So just keep doing what you are doing.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


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