#1
If I wanted a song that would use the mixolydian mode what would be some good chords to use under it?
#2
Let's do this in G, as in the G Mixolydian scale: G A B C D E F.

The special note, the note that differs from G major, is F. So find chords that use F. Those chords are F major, D minor, and B half diminished. You'll want to stay away from the B chord, as it will draw the ear back to C rather than G(7), so a progression involving G, F and Dm is good for G mixolydian.

I put the 7 in parenthesis because you could play G as well.
#3
play a twelve bar blues (although you might wanna play that mixolydian scale based on each chord as playing the mixolydian to the the I7 wont work on the IV7 for instance)
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#4
mixolydian is good for a middle-eastern kind of flair. use those minor and 7th chords liberally. make sure your lead player knows the scale well, and it's a lot of fun to jam in.
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#5
Quote by thepagesaretorn
play a twelve bar blues (although you might wanna play that mixolydian scale based on each chord as playing the mixolydian to the the I7 wont work on the IV7 for instance)
That could work, but you would be using 3 different scales.


But to quote Seinfeld, "not that there's anything wrong with that."

Quote by twocenttip
mixolydian is good for a middle-eastern kind of flair.
I've never heard that before. If you are wrong about the scale name, I can correct you, and if you are correct, I get another cool lick!
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jul 12, 2007,
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That could work, but you would be using 3 different scales.

True, but they'd all be mixolydian.
Whereas, if you stuck to notes in G mixo and played them over a G Dm F chord progression you'd move through G mixolydian, D dorian and F lydian.
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#7
Quote by Ænimus Prime
True, but they'd all be mixolydian.
Whereas, if you stuck to notes in G mixo and played them over a G Dm F chord progression you'd move through G mixolydian, D dorian and F lydian.



What do you mean?
#8
Well, the chord determines the mode/scale that is being played over it. If you play the notes G A B C D E F over a Dm chord, the root note is D. So the notes all relate to D, creating different intervals, and those intervals correspond to D Dorian.

Do you understand?
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Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Well, the chord determines the mode/scale that is being played over it. If you play the notes G A B C D E F over a Dm chord, the root note is D. So the notes all relate to D, creating different intervals, and those intervals correspond to D Dorian.

Do you understand?
While you are correct, the progression resolves to G *at least you can make it), so you can consider the entire thing to be a G Mixolydian progression, much like you can consider E A B an E major progression, even though there is technically a new scale with each chord.
#10
lol i said in my thing that it wouldnt be the same mixolydian scale. and also depends on how you wanna phrase that twelve bar. if u have a jazz twelve bar blues, it's waaaay more than 3 chords for instance.
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#11
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Well, the chord determines the mode/scale that is being played over it. If you play the notes G A B C D E F over a Dm chord, the root note is D. So the notes all relate to D, creating different intervals, and those intervals correspond to D Dorian.

Do you understand?



Yea I understand what you saying. I am trying to write a song and i want to use the D mixolydian mode so what chords would i use so that the intervals correspond to D mixolydian?
#12
Mixolydian - 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
D Mixolydian - D E F# G A B C

The only way to play those notes as D mixo is when D is the root ie over a D chord (D7, Dsus, Dsus2 etc).

But as BGC pointed out, you can also make a D mixolydian chord progression. The characteristic interval is the b7, C. So you want to use chords that contain C, namely D7, C, Am, F#dim. That F#dim will want to resolve to G so you don't want to use it, and the D7 will also want to resolve to G so you're better off just using D.

So, you're left with the chords D Am C. These could be used to make a D mixo chord progression.

But remember, if you play the notes D E F# G A B C over anything other than a D root, it will be a different mode.
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Quote by MudMartin
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#13
in short it's the chords that create that myxolydian sound. it's also what notes you use to make something sound myxolydian, so the notes you use for a riff can create a myxolydian sound

try something like this for a riff

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------9h10h12p10p9--------------------------------------
-------------12--10--9--------------------------------------9-10-12--10---9-----------
--10h12-----------------12-------------------------------10-10-10--12--10-----------
Last edited by jimmypage1904 at Jul 12, 2007,
#14
Quote by twocenttip
mixolydian is good for a middle-eastern kind of flair.



He's right, a lot of eastern music (Indian ragas and such) use the lydian and mixolydian modes.