#1
What progressions are commonly used in modes? I know my modes, and I know the chord that exist in each mode, but when I just play around with a melody, I inevitably force the scale back into the Ionian or Aeolian that the mode was formed from. Then I make sure I use alot of the tonic of the mode to make sure its obvious I'm in that mode and not its parent maj/min, but using the root too much doesn't sound as good. Is the i-iv-v the way to go? Cuz that just sounds generic. In ionian you can use the ii to lead into the V and then use a deceptive cadence into the vi, lots of tricks in the major. Any tips for the mods?

Especially, how do you use the 6# in dorian? It just sounds out of place to me. And how do you balance locrian, it's... unstable?
#2
Modes have a characteristic chord that help bring out that mode's unique sound.

Let's try doing it for my current favorite mode: Lydian. 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7. What degree sets it apart from the other modes? The #4. So a chord that makes use of that #4(11) will help you bring out the sound.

_maj7#11, _ maj9(#11), etc. If you are playing over a D minor chord and stress the root of F Lydian, f, it'll just sound like you're landing on the third of the chord.

Dorian doesn't have a #6. It has a b7.
#3
The modes are best when they are used over certain chords...Locrian itself sucks bigtime, and you can't make it stable, but play it over any m7b5 it's a killer...

Kirby is right about modes having a characteristic chord. Find some Gambale books, the "Improvisation Made Easier" is just what you want.

And Kirbyrocknroll...dorian IS identical to a MINOR SCALE with #6th scale degree, don't confuse people...

[EDIT]Thanks Aenimus Prime for correcting my expression
I am Žile, I'm from Serbia, and I like guitars... and beans of course...never underestimate well cooked beans!

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Last edited by zhille at Jul 12, 2007,
#5
i don't know anything that has to do with actual theory...
i may know like.. 3 scales.. but other than that i'm totally clueless
i just play what sounds good
and i'm not a newb either..
#6
And yes...if you are interested in a particular mode, I can scan the "Improvisation Made Easier" pages about that mode for you, and give you links...every mode and scale has about 8 pages in that book, plus the characteristic chords and their diagrams.
PM me about that and I can do it fairly quick.

Don't abuse this offer
I am Žile, I'm from Serbia, and I like guitars... and beans of course...never underestimate well cooked beans!

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Last edited by zhille at Jul 12, 2007,
#7
Quote by zhille
And Kirbyrocknroll...dorian IS identical to a MINOR SCALE with #6th, don't confuse people...

I know exactly what you mean, but you should write 'raised sixth scale degree', because #6 means 'augmented sixth interval'. Dorian doesn't have an augmented sixth.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
Quote by flashbandit
What progressions are commonly used in modes? I know my modes, and I know the chord that exist in each mode, but when I just play around with a melody, I inevitably force the scale back into the Ionian or Aeolian that the mode was formed from. Then I make sure I use alot of the tonic of the mode to make sure its obvious I'm in that mode and not its parent maj/min, but using the root too much doesn't sound as good. Is the i-iv-v the way to go? Cuz that just sounds generic. In ionian you can use the ii to lead into the V and then use a deceptive cadence into the vi, lots of tricks in the major. Any tips for the mods?

Especially, how do you use the 6# in dorian? It just sounds out of place to me. And how do you balance locrian, it's... unstable?



Ok...so what im getting out of that appears to be that you are looking for a way to ballance the modes in a song with out making them to dissonint. Well i have severl suggestions for you then. First and for most: Intermos of Chord Progressions I IV V works great in anything. But find a way to incorperate your altered scale degree into the song...but don't take out the consonince of the song.

Lets to Mixolydian for simplicity and its my favorite. (In F)

F G A Bflat C D Eflat

Chord Wise its

Fmajor
Gminor
Aminor
Bbmajor
C Major
D
Eb Diminshed

So using the I IV V (F Bb C) progression won't get us any where here....or will it?
We could incorperate it by using a Eb and puting it into Bb...thus we have used F mixolydian to its extent.

Try using the dissonice to your advantage to...
#9
Firstly the triads built from the F Mixolydian scale are
F Gm Adim Bb Cm Dm Eb

Intermos of Chord Progressions I IV V

What does that mean?

We could incorperate it by using a Eb and puting it into Bb...thus we have used F mixolydian to its extent.

I don't understand you, what are you talking about?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums