#1
I know I've seen a thread on this before, but a search for several key terms turned up nothing.

My Cherry Sunburst LP has a few minor scratches on the back where it hit my metal belt (that was dumb, eh?.. damn you, alcohol!) They don't appear to be too deep (i.e. not down to the wood), but they've got the milky white scratch color to them and you can feel that it's probably about 0.3 mm deep.

I was wondering what are some easy ways to fix up these scratches so they're hardly noticeable without close inspection. There are probably about 5 or 6 individual scratches up to 3/4 in long but all about the same depth and color. I believe I heard (saw) somebody mention glossy nail polish for those minor scratches, but how well would that work on a sunburst? Would it look too smudgy? Any tips at all? Or can somebody direct me to a good thread on this? I checked the main posts of the stickied thread and a couple pages but found nothing.

Any help is appreciated, and thanks in advance. Everybody in here really knows their stuff.
#2
high speed buffer with a good compuond and polish. i use it on cars all the time it minimizes the scratches. you can barely notice them
#3
Quote by lbc_sublime
high speed buffer with a good compuond and polish. i use it on cars all the time it minimizes the scratches. you can barely notice them


Yeah, but I don't own (or know anybody that owns) a high speed buffer. It would be rather pricey, no? Wouldn't it be cheaper to take it to a guitar shop that DOES own one?

I'm looking for a quick DIY Low-cost solution.

Thanks, though
#6
Quote by lbc_sublime
is it a gibson or an epi?

don't see why that would matter....
But you don't need a buffer just some polishing compound or I'v heard mirror glaze novus (but I think that was for plastic....) and a lint free cloth and just use some elbow grease and buff it by hand. No need for a buffer.
#7
Quote by XibanezedgeX
don't see why that would matter....
But you don't need a buffer just some polishing compound or I'v heard mirror glaze novus (but I think that was for plastic....) and a lint free cloth and just use some elbow grease and buff it by hand. No need for a buffer.


Thanks. Anybody got any ideas if the scratches end up being too deep for buffing?

EDIT: And what about wet sanding? Techniques? Effectiveness?
Last edited by RockThe40oz at Jul 14, 2007,
#10
Quote by XibanezedgeX
don't see why that would matter....
But you don't need a buffer just some polishing compound or I'v heard mirror glaze novus (but I think that was for plastic....) and a lint free cloth and just use some elbow grease and buff it by hand. No need for a buffer.



see the buffer actually technically you don't need. you can do it by hand the best outcome you will get is you will still be able to see it in the light it just minimizes the scratches. so there more smooth. which is a very good thing.

the buffer on the other hand (which i know you can't get i am just explaining) heats up the paint and actually melts it a tiny bit and you can make it look like there was never a scratch in the first place. at leasr a good buffer can.

i wouldn't recomend wet sanding but if you want to(it is alot of effort and you can go through the paint if your not careful i can give you some good advice on it we do that to cars all the time at work

is there a clear coat on that?
#11
iwas gonna say if you were gonna put nail polish on a nice gibson i would save up and just do it right instaed of cutting corners
#12
if you do it by hand i would buy a polishing cloth(there extremely soft) they shouldn't be that much money the whole thing is if you use the wrong one it will scratch the paint. u can use a terry cloth i think to put it on. you'll want to use a terry cloth to remove the polish or a micro fiber but those are expensive.