#1
This forum shall be filled with..... you guessed it, SHRED ONLY. (vai, yngwie, gilbert, cooley etc.) please share techniques and ask for them. I am by no means an expert shredder but i would like to help and be helped. thnx btw does anyone know of other arpeggios that fit into the diminished scale? Yes i can build them but i want names.
TONE FREAK!!!
#3
I'm a n00b at shredding. How exactly do i make my own arpeggio shapes? Or do i just have to find out where to get them on the internet? cheers
#4
Quote by YourMessiah666
I'm a n00b at shredding. How exactly do i make my own arpeggio shapes? Or do i just have to find out where to get them on the internet? cheers

You could figure out the notes in a certain chord and create your own shapes. That's always somewhat fun
#5
Quote by YourMessiah666
I'm a n00b at shredding. How exactly do i make my own arpeggio shapes? Or do i just have to find out where to get them on the internet? cheers



Make your own, its not that hard. Just try to stack notes that you think sound cool together or something, and keep adding here and there.
#6
Okay. Any diminished scale. there will always be the same arp shapes in different places since each scale is the same shape just repositioned on the neck correct? yes. Ex... in g major say there were only two major arps. well if that were the case E major there would only be two. all i am looking for are the names of the shapes
TONE FREAK!!!
#8
Quote by YourMessiah666
I'm a n00b at shredding. How exactly do i make my own arpeggio shapes? Or do i just have to find out where to get them on the internet? cheers


okay. take a barre chord that you like. to make this a sweep add the third degree to the top and bottom strings. or just simply count up four frets from your bass note on the top string i.e. "the third" just add things like this to any chord shape and you'l have an arp. that is since an arp is just a slow strum of a chord if you will
TONE FREAK!!!
#9
my advice would be to look up arpeggio patterns for major minor and diminished, to start. learn the shapes that are the most concise and shaped similar to the actual chord youre playing the notes of. for example
E [ 12 17 12
B [ 13 13
G [ 14 14
D [ 14 14
A [12 15 15 12
E [
an a minor arpeggio, looks a lot to me like an a minor barre chord in 12th position. because it is, simply with the addition of the C and A on the A string and (high) E. thats where i started and it got the ball rolling substiantially for me. try major too, see what shapes you like. they arent hard to find, you are on a guitar website. start with a couple easy shapes slowly. dont just "make up" arpeggios of whatever sounds cool. youll never know what the hell youre doing and it will take you forever to get anywhere realistically with sweeping, but thats my opinion.
#10
ok that whole tab thing got totally fuct. sorry im too lazy to do it again but just look it up.
#11
If you want to master arpeggios and eventually learn to sweep the hell out of them
all over the neck, THE place to start is triads.

For every triad you'll have 3 inversions which, when played as a 3 string sweep,
will give you 3 different patterns. In the major scale you'll have 3 major, 3 minor
and 1 diminished triad. Start with one inversion and practice playing 3 string
triad sweeps, in key, up and down the neck. Do that on all strings. Then practice
playing them across the neck (diatonically in 4ths).

Give that about a month. Then do the next triad inversion for about a month. Then
do the final inversion for about a month.

At the end of that time, not only will you be seeing the scale all over the fretboard so
much better, you'll be able to start connecting the triads together all over the place
in different ways and you'll pretty much be able to sweep your own stuff anywhere
on the neck and always be in key (if you want).

EDIT: I used a month as a guess. Depends on how you practice, but one month is
probably a minimum.
#12
Oh jesus, I just started learning Air by Jason Becker. Its so bloody beautiful as well as a huge challenge to play. Its not immensly fast, the 16th triplets are a bit of a worry, but its the odd sweep shapes that are difficult, but captivating when listening to them...

ooh, Ive gone on a bit, all in all, great song to learn, highly recommend
Quote by Robbie n strat
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Little children should be felt, not heard.
#13
my 2 cents for "shred"

penny 1) it's all about the control, never play faster than what you can play cleanly. even if you aren't technically shredding

penny 2) phrasing is one of the most important aspects of "shredding" shooting off 16th notes consistently for a minute and a half gets boring (imo, i think most musicians would agree with me on this, though there may be a point where this sounds the best)
#14
penny 1) it's all about the control, never play faster than what you can play cleanly. even if you aren't technically shredding


Definitely, I hate it when my mates crank the distortion and play something fast, and think its shredding, but when you turn off the distortion sounds like ****.. Always stat slow and play perfect with good technique before you "shred", or else you'll just cause ear damage
#15
I have a question, are arpeggios/sweep picking really that important? I have been playing for 2 years, and i play Metallica, Pantera, Vai etc. but never had to use an arpeggio or sweep. Everyone's talking about them and how they're so important, but if i've never used one in a song, are they really that important? And maybe could you suggest some samples of songs with arpeggios and sweep picking so I could see what all the fuss is about?
Last edited by si! at Aug 9, 2007,
#16
They aren't "important," but I would definitely suggest you try using them. They are just another way to make the sound that you want. Sweet picking is not mandatory, but it really depends on how you want to sound. Just experiment with arpeggios/inversions and whatever, and figure out what you like.
#17
Quote by si!
I have a question, are arpeggios/sweep picking really that important? I have been playing for 2 years, and i play Metallica, Pantera, Vai etc. but never had to use an arpeggio or sweep. Everyone's talking about them and how they're so important, but if i've never used one in a song, are they really that important? And maybe could you suggest some samples of songs with arpeggios and sweep picking so I could see what all the fuss is about?

Trust me, if you play Metallica, Pantera and Vai you have come across them... you probably just didn't realise what they were. Do a little research and you should understand a great deal more.
Originally posted by WlCmToTheJungle "you have just received the amish computer virus. Since the amish dont have computers it's based on there honor system so please delete all of your files immediatly. thank you
#18
I don't know if it's swept, but there's a bit in the Creeping Death solo which is an A minor triad. 14 on G, 13 on B, 12h17p12 on e, back and forth in triplets - you'll recognise it. Something like that would be good to practice. Like Huzzah says, it's just another colour for your palette, just like legato, heavy downstroking, staccato playing, etcetera.
#19
Quote by Caressing Death
Trust me, if you play Metallica, Pantera and Vai you have come across them... you probably just didn't realise what they were. Do a little research and you should understand a great deal more.

Ok, so now my question is, if i've come across them, but can do them fine apparently (I can shred all the solos ) Do I need to practice them?