#1
Hi. How much do you think an original Fender Precision 71 model would go for??? It's in decent nick. Obviously a bit scratched up with love but as far as it's playability goes it's A1. I'm not selling but I just wanted to see what some other UG Bassists would think it would pitch for ??? wise.

Cheers and Rock 'N' Roll
#2
Unfortunatly, because it's a CBS Fender it's not worth as much as pre-CBS models (Before 1965). How ever I would imagine it's still worth quite a bit. Certainly as much as a current model Fender, if not more! You might be looking at the £1500 price range.

EDIT - Not all CBS Fenders are bad. They were criticised for cutting corners so quality control fell but there are some jems out there. I played my friends original '72 Tele and it was awesome. Plus, they're sexy as hell. I sure wouldn't sell it if i was you.

Gear:
Fender Standard Jazz Bass
Artec Matrix Pedal Tuner
BBE Optostomp
Boss GEB 7
EHX NYC Big Muff
Ashdown MAG C410T-300
Torque T100BX
GAS-ing for:
Boss SYB5
Behringer Intelligate IG9
Last edited by Jonnomainman at Jul 15, 2007,
#3
There is a huge market for early 70's Fenders. You have to remember, the pre-CBS crap only really started because people had a fond nostalgia for them. This coincided with the 80's where money was aplently. A a result, this generation had a lot of money for their nostalgia trips, and due to the small supply this became valuable. The same is being seen with the 70's Fenders to a lesser extend. (An instrument is worth only how much someone will pay for it).

Of course the CBS quality control issues were infamous during the 70's, but this only got real bad during the very late 70's.

Depending on condition, originality, etc., I would expect to pay somewhere between £1400 and £2000 if it's all there. I personally wouldn't sell below £1100 no matter what the originality. (People pay a lot for spares and replacements). You can read these prices as US$ too, as the cost of living approximates to £1=$1.

What ever you do, do not sell! A bass like that (depending on condition) could make a nice retirement fund. Also, you'd get a lot of fun out of it too!
#4
Oh one more thing... be sure to get it verified by a vintage expert. There are surprisingly a lot of fakes popping up.
#6
depending on the color, and condition-
Fender-
Precision Bass,
1971, (us dollars)
Black- $2,100 - $2,400
Firemist Gold,
Sonic Blue- $3,000 - $3,200
Lake Placid Blue- $2,300 - $2,600
Natural,
Olympic White- $1,900 - $2,200
sunburst- $2,000 - $2,300
prices listed are for, low to high, excellent condition.
#7
After 1969 they started using poly finish, which is much much tougher (but some say doesn't sound as good as nitro). Fender still uses poly to this day. I've seen a '72 in Natural at a music store sell for $2400.

The problem with Fenders from this era is that quality control was Pete-Wentz-Bass-Solo poor and CBS was adding ideas to their instruments that didn't have enough R&D time... For example, the tilt function and the three bolt neck plate. That made necks, especially on basses, prone to shifting sideways.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#9
Quote by shut_up_you_***
There is a huge market for early 70's Fenders. You have to remember, the pre-CBS crap only really started because people had a fond nostalgia for them. This coincided with the 80's where money was aplently. A a result, this generation had a lot of money for their nostalgia trips, and due to the small supply this became valuable. The same is being seen with the 70's Fenders to a lesser extend. (An instrument is worth only how much someone will pay for it).

Of course the CBS quality control issues were infamous during the 70's, but this only got real bad during the very late 70's.

Depending on condition, originality, etc., I would expect to pay somewhere between £1400 and £2000 if it's all there. I personally wouldn't sell below £1100 no matter what the originality. (People pay a lot for spares and replacements). You can read these prices as US$ too, as the cost of living approximates to £1=$1.

What ever you do, do not sell! A bass like that (depending on condition) could make a nice retirement fund. Also, you'd get a lot of fun out of it too!


I passionately disagree with a lot of this. The Pre-CBS stuff was simply much better. The whole nostalgia angle is bogus, considering Hendrix used mainly post-CBS gear. If nostalgia was a big thing, it'd be for Hendrix's stuff. The pre-CBS stuff sounded great. After the CBS L-series (L standing for Leftover, in terms of parts), quality did indeed go down the gutter. I played a '73 Strat that I could easily shift the neck. Don't forget, the nitro finishes went away, too. Let's not forget the botched Micro-Tilt feature and the weak 3-bolt neckplate.

'59 Les Paul Bursts ($250000) and Stack Knob Jazz ($30000) basses are small fortunes (a pair of PAF humbuckers is $15000). They aren't holy grails because of the people that used them.

Bottom line, it's a nice decent bass, but it is by no means a retirement fund. It's no mistake that early 60's are selling for well over 10x the price of early 70's stuff.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..