#1
Well, if I have chose to use an Em scale for example to base my song on, when it comes to the solo, what other scales can be used apart from the scale that the song was based on?

Hope to hear from guitar gurus soon. =]
#2
.......... . . . .. C Major
Decaptivated

Ibanez S370 (all custom)
Mesa Boogie Studio Pre
Fender Champ 25se (used to power Mesa pre)
Custom 2x12 cab w/ Eminence Texas Heats
#3
Quote by phatsack
.......... . . . .. C Major

Don't you mean G major? That's the relative major of Em, anyway.
But you have a crapload of options. You could whip out some E blues, or just minor pentatonic.
You could form a key change specifically for the solo. Like, transition to F#m or something like that. That also works.
Um... well, I thought I could think of more than that, but apparently I'm not very inventive. You could try what I suggested, though. You never know, it may work for ya.
#4
If your song is in E minor, any scale that isn't E minor is gonna clash and sound bad. Unless that's what you want. Otherwise E blues could sound nice, but it will be bluesy.
#6
Quote by SethMegadefan
You don't say?!


well I was trying to point out that if he doesn't want his song to sound bluesy, it would be a bad choice. I realise the obviousness of the statement.
#7
Quote by sam i am
well I was trying to point out that if he doesn't want his song to sound bluesy, it would be a bad choice. I realise the obviousness of the statement.

I know, I was just being an ass. I know that's a surprise to no one.
But bluesy isn't necessarily bad in a minor key. Actually, a friend of mine wrote a ballad that was in the key of F#m at the end, and it erupted into a solo revolving around A blues. And it fit, strangely enough. If used correctly, the blues scale can come in handy.
But don't worry, I knew what you were trying to say with your previous comment. The opportunity for me to be an ass just looked too good to pass up.
#9
Quote by sam i am
If your song is in E minor, any scale that isn't E minor is gonna clash and sound bad. Unless that's what you want. Otherwise E blues could sound nice, but it will be bluesy.


this isn't entirely true. im not trying to rip on ya or anything, but E minor will work and over the chords being used you can use those degree's of the scale. for example if you had a simple chord progression, Em, G, C, B5, you could use the degree's corresponding to this such as over the :

Em chord you could use E, F#, G, A, B, C D
G chord you could use G,A,B,C,D,E,F#
C chord you could use C, D, E, F#, G, A,B
B5 you could use B,C,D,E,F#,G,A

those are all different scales (i can't think of their names right now, sue me) that can be used over E. You can also play scales based on the V of the key (with some creative effort, in this case, something simple like B minor pentatonic would sound good leading into a E or G scale) if it modulates into a IV or V / iv or v you could play those relative keys to lead into it. theres really a LOT of stuff you can do.
#10
What are the actual chords you are using, and how long on each?

:-)
What is a scale? How to work out scales.. What chords to use.. What are modes & where to find them.. ALL CAN BE FOUND AT www.robinmay.co.uk


PLUS - free backing tracks!!