#1
Simply I wanna take my playing to the next level.
Any books you would recccomend, I've heard about "Rock Discipline", by Petrucci, is it good?

I want to brush up on technique and accuracy, as well as speed, so any help is appreciated!
#3
Speed Mechanics For Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina helped my playing out ALOT, I only used it for a few months though . Thats where I got the lifting fingers to increase independence ideas from. *cough*
#4
Rock Guitar Gecrets - Peter Fischer
Shred Guitar: A Complete System for the Rock Guitar Improviser - Paul Hanson
Advanced Modern Rock Guitar Improvisation

Those are some that I liked, for some reason I never liked the ones most do like Speed Mechanics or Rock Discipline.
#6
Quote by insideac
Speed Mechanics For Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina helped my playing out ALOT, I only used it for a few months though . Thats where I got the lifting fingers to increase independence ideas from. *cough*

+1

And Shred Guitar Manifesto by Rusty Cooley is very helpful aswell
#7
Quote by Stratwizard
I strongly recommend Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar I and II.


I have heard these are really good as well. Apperently the second has some great advice on 8 finger tapping.
Quote by Prophet of Page
If Hendrix, Clapton and Page were to jam, the most impressive guitarist playing would be Paul Gilbert.


Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

member of the Mitch Hedberg pwns club pm Knives490 to join
#8
I have a pretty good collection of guitar books. I would consider these to be
MUST HAVES for just about anyone who wants to get really good:

1) Principles of Correct Practice For Guitar
2) The Deeper I Go, The Deeper It Gets
3) Beyond The Basic Practice Approach
4) Sheets of Sound Vols I & II

1-3 available, as johnjones mentioned, www.guitarprinciples.com
4 at www.sheetsofsound.net

Honorable mentions:

1) Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar. Good exercises. 2nd best practice information you can get, but still sadly very skimpy.
2) Creative Guitar I & II. Good suplement to above stuff.
3) Shred Guitar. Actually a fairly decent theory book in disguise with good mode examples, licks and a practical theory section. But, actual shred technique? feggedabowdit.
#9
To the people I that own speed mechanics for lead guitar (edg and insideac), I have a question about using it.

There are a lot of execises and this is my method -
I start at 80bpm (16ths), and wtry and work up to 120bpm. I do half an hour a day, and increase the tempo 2bpm a day. When I have the exercise up tp 120bpm, I move onto the next one. Would this be a good method?

And I'ms till only on the first 3 legato execises...
#10
Yeah that's a good workout, but try to get some more exercises than just 3. Keep your fingers challenged.

Also, what I did when I worked with that book was I basically worked on the right hand section of the book, and then I jumped into flight of the bumblebee. After I got that up to speed I put the book down
#11
^^^^ well I like legato, so I think I'll do the left hand ones. However there, are well over 100 exercises in the book, so I'll have to be more choosey about which ones I think I will benefit from and how much time I spend on them.

And I'm only on the first 3 because that't how I'm trying to work through them and it takes a couple of weeks for each exercise.....
#12
It's really up for your to figure out how much time you need to spend on any one
thing. For doing pulloffs I think 80 BPM 16th notes is way too fast a starting tempo
to learn them right. Hammerons are easier. In my chromatic pulloff workup I was
starting at around 80 BPM quarter notes.

I skip around depending on what I feel
like doing. I never set BPM goals or timeframes for myself. Trying to "beat the
metronome" practice I find counter-productive to actually gaining progress on a
deep level. I set the metronome where I'm comfortable for playing at a target
rhythym and then adjust the rhythyms I'm using to change speeds. I find that's
more useful for the most part and just change the metronome speed to fine tune
overall rhythym speeds I'm using. I'll work on something for as long as I need to
until I've reached a proficiency level I'm satisfied with. Might be a day, a month or
more. Exercise 8 was a regular part of my practice for about a year.

No exercise is ever really "done". I go back to things a lot.
#13
Get the Guitar Grimoire scales and modes it should help tons!
www.myspace.com/thestalkingbutlers

Holy Knight of the Crusading Order of the Stratocaster.

Gear:
MIA Fender Stratocaster
MIA Fender Telecaster
MI? Fender TC-90

Fender Hot Rod Deville
Blackstar HT5, HT40

various pedals
#14
Quote by Stratwizard
I strongly recommend Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar I and II.


Yup.

Of course, you need to know how to practice and the like, so the principles books are pretty okay, if a bit airy and a bit light on right hand technique.
#15
Quote by Freepower

Of course, you need to know how to practice and the like, so the principles books are pretty okay, if a bit airy and a bit light on right hand technique.


Yeah. There could be more in there, but the aim is more to open awareness than
anything else. It might seem more airy if you don't give some of the things a go,
but there's more to it than meets the eye.

Using a pick IS kind of skimpy. It only gets into the picking foundation and not much
beyond, but even so, most people would still need to work on what's there quite
a bit to make it the foundation of how they pick.

It's one of those books to read through. Try some of it out for a while, then go back
through it again and again. The problem is, its the only game in town. There isn't
another book that focuses on this aspect of playing like this, so there's really no
where else to go.
#16
It isn't all just about playing fast, but I'll recommend Joe Satriani's Guitar Secrets. The Smart Fingers and Finding the Note exercises have helped me a lot.