#1
Hey all, I just want to know if i'm being screwed or not in this deal.

A guy working at a guitar shop (one that i know and trust) has gotten one of these babys to sell. It's quite old, it's from the mid-eighties, and the guy in the shop assures me that this is a good thing, as the amps back then were made to a much higher standard in quality. I played it, but the tubes were knackered, so he's promised to give it a full service and change the tubes before I look at it again.

He's selling for 1000 euro (though im aiming to haggle down to 950ish...) with a very nice flight case worth about 200 on its own included. It's the kind of amp i'm looking for...

The main question is about the age thing. Are the older models better made? thanks.
"You shank my jenga ship!" - Homsar
#2
Quote by Johnny G
He's selling for 1000 euro (though im aiming to haggle down to 950ish...) with a very nice flight case worth about 200 on its own included. It's the kind of amp i'm looking for...


How does that compare to the new AC30CC models, price-wise? The new ones are very good, the old ones (60's) are highly sought after. The ones from the era you're talking about seem to be largely overlooked. At the time they were new, they were very expensive, which is probably the main reason that they weren't big sellers.

I honestly can't speak to whether they're built better than the new ones or not. All I know is that I've seen them selling for about 25% more than the price of a new AC30CC here (in the US), and that I wasn't interested in paying it. I got a deal on a used AC30CC1 instead. Great tone for A LOT less money.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#3
A brand new CC1 would cost 999 euro from thomann online store, which is the cheapest place i can find for amps. In a shop, it woud probably be much more. I've been keepin my eye out for used ones and this is the only one I could find
"You shank my jenga ship!" - Homsar
#4
I found a similar looking one by simply googling for it.

http://www.tradingmusician.com/catalog/index.cfm?fuseaction=product&theParentId=126&id=8553

This one's going for $2000, i'm not sure of the conversion from dollars to euro, but 1000 euro is a lot LOT less from what i can gather!

Would I be right in saying that the 80's ones are the ones with the 3 inputs (hi and lo for each, so six altogether)?
"You shank my jenga ship!" - Homsar
#6
Take a look at this link. Is this the amp you're looking at? I think it is.

Anyway, this is the first design that they employed a PCB in the manufacture. So it's not like they can make the "hand-wired" claim.

If I could get a new one for the same money -or less!- then I'd be going for the new one. I like the blendable channels, the tone contol options, and the availability of reverb. I also have no reason to believe that the 80's version is built better. The new ones had their bugs early on, but they've gotten past that now. Plus, you get the added piece of mind of a warranty.

But in the end, maybe you'll have a chance to try 'em out side by side? That's what counts the most.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#7
Johnny, A few bits of info on AC30's that I got from the guys at VOX. VOX started to introduce PCBs into the AC30 fairly soon after Jennings went bust (early 70's) but this was really the only change to the Amp - the actual components were the same as the hand wired and their layout on the PCBs is almost identical to the hand wired. Not surprisingly the amps sound very very similar to the hand wired. I've got an early 70's AC30TB with PCBs and I can't tell the difference between a hand wired.
However, before you buy this amp (and the price is not bad for an AC30 in full working order) you need to see and more importantly hear it after the full valve refurb and pay particular attention to the volume and tone controls; they should be really easy to turn and you shouldn't hear any nasty crackles (make sure the amp is good and warmed up when you do this -takes about 10 mins). Also as you wind up the volume you should get a smooth transition to the classsic AC30 overdriven valve sound and you should have stacks of control over this. If you are happy with all of this buy the amp and enjoy; but bear in mind this is not a bedroom practice amp - AC30's need and like to be driven hard!!
#10
Quote by rastaman_Marley
CCs are made in China, the actual one would (possibly be made in britain, MAYBE). the CCs are very unreliable according to friends i've spoken to that have owned them
All AC30s are unreliable, and that's coming from my guitar teacher who has 4, 3 originals from the 60-70s and one CC, and they've all broken down at least once.

he said "it's a sacrifice you make for the tone of the things"
The Laney Thread are big and clever. No exceptions.
#11
Quote by rastaman_Marley
CCs are made in China, the actual one would (possibly be made in britain, MAYBE). the CCs are very unreliable according to friends i've spoken to that have owned them


I bought one in a pawn shop, and it works like a charm. No issues whatsoever.

There were some problems early on, but production in China has been going on for a while now, and all the kinks seem to've been worked out. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this amp to anyone. Even at twice what I paid.

That said, Mr. Carrot is right, too. Lack of reliability has pretty much been a feature of the AC30 since it's inception.
You Don't Need a halfstack.

You Don't Need 100W.

Quote by jj1565
i love you slats.
#12
hahah this is quite old, but I have to put my experience with my amp...mine has not had any problems at all....I havent had it for long, about half a year, but still...nothing wrong with it. I think MrCarrot's teacher just didnt take good care of his...
Quote by RetroGunslinger
this is like comparing a flushing toilet to a hole in the ground
#14
haha sorry, I just searched something on ac30s and this popped up, so I put my opinion...
Quote by RetroGunslinger
this is like comparing a flushing toilet to a hole in the ground