#1
ok so i have decided to buy a new amp and i need some help so i can decide which amp to buy. My price range is preferrably under 300 dollars. what i want is an amp that has a great sound(obviously) but i also want an amp that can play a variety of styles and one that has alot of dif effects. one question i have is what does the number in the name of the amp mean like Line 6 Spider III 75 Modeling Combo Amplifier. what does the 75 mean?? how come the one with 15 in it is much cheaper?? and what is a modelling amp??
#2
You will not get an amp with lots of effects and good sound. Its one or the other.
#3
Ok, SO here we go. A modeling amp is made to sound like an amp it's not. The numbers usually indicate how much wattage it has. 15 watts is good for bedroom practice while 75 watts is good for very small gigs or band practice. When people buy an amp, they usually want it loud. The louder the amp, the bigger and better it is[most times]. It takes a lot more parts and precision to nail a 100 watt amp in building than a 15. It's also riskier to make one because if it blows up[like a bomb], you have more chance surviving a 15 watter than a 100 watter.

I would think...
#4
Well, a modelling amp would be the way to go if you want lots of variety. I use a Vox ADVT and it can do a wide range of different tones. The downside is although in mine and many others' opinions it sounds a fair bit better than other purely solid state amplifiers it never quite fulfils your desire for a particular tone. What type of amp you should get also depends on what you want to do with it.
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#5
Ok, SO here we go. A modeling amp is made to sound like an amp it's not. The numbers usually indicate how much wattage it has. 15 watts is good for bedroom practice while 75 watts is good for very small gigs or band practice. When people buy an amp, they usually want it loud. The louder the amp, the bigger and better it is[most times]. It takes a lot more parts and precision to nail a 100 watt amp in building than a 15. It's also riskier to make one because if it blows up[like a bomb], you have more chance surviving a 15 watter than a 100 watter.

The lack of suicide bombers charging around with Line 6 Spders strapped to their backs is testament to the non-existent explosive qualities of the average guitar amplifier.

TS, first thing you need to know is that the Line 6 Spider is an awful-sounding amp that should be avoided at all costs.

Right, now that's out of the way...numbers in amp names mean lots of different things. Sometimes it's the wattage, sometimes it's the number of speakers, sometimes they're nothing more than a model number. Best thing to do is check the specs to find out what's what.

A modelling amp uses digital processing to simulate the behaviour of a more expensive amp, with varying levels of success. The two best modelling amps in your price range are the Vox Valvetronix series and the Roland Cube series. The Cube has excellent cleans and a good simulation of a Mesa Boogie for high gain stuff, however the mid-gain sounds are a bit lacking. The Vox lacks a great high gain sound for metal, but has better mid-gain sounds.

With your budget a modeller is probably the best bet, so pop down to a shop and have a paly with both a Cube and a Valvetronix and see which you prefer. They're both well made, nice-sounding amps and they have useable built in effects to play with.
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#6
I wouldn't recommend getting an amp with a variety of different effects since they tend to be limited (better get the effects separately later on). For bedroom practice and a first amp get Roland Cube 15X or maybe even a Roland Micro Cube... I have never heard of anyone being disappointed with this as their first amp. (or you could get a marshall)
Last edited by Zetcher at Jul 27, 2007,
#7
Quote by Leat
Ok, SO here we go. A modeling amp is made to sound like an amp it's not. The numbers usually indicate how much wattage it has. 15 watts is good for bedroom practice while 75 watts is good for very small gigs or band practice. When people buy an amp, they usually want it loud. The louder the amp, the bigger and better it is[most times]. It takes a lot more parts and precision to nail a 100 watt amp in building than a 15. It's also riskier to make one because if it blows up[like a bomb], you have more chance surviving a 15 watter than a 100 watter.

I would think...

Better? Try "just the same but with more wattage".

Takes more parts and precision? Usually it's just a few more tubes (I'm way oversimplifying, but that's the basic idea of the thing).

Riskier? What? A few caps and resistors ain't gonna go Chernobyl on you, friend.


Do you even know what you're talking about?

EDIT: Due to my lack of speed-typing skills, what I wanted to say has already been said. Damn.
#8
But honestly, amps don't blow up and DON'T BUY A SPIDER!!! They suck ass. If you plan on sticking to guitar for any period of time you're going to need ~50 Watts or more: that way you'll have "headroom" (meaning you'll still have some "volume" or "level" left) if you're ever jamming with a drummer and without a PA system.

It's also a lie that you can't get a good sounding amp with on board effects. No you can't get a pro-level amp in this price range, but unless you're talking about 5 watt A-class tube recording amps there is NOTHING in this price range that the pros use. Anyway these are the three amplifiers that will serve you best:

Crate RFX65 - $300
Vox AD50VT - $360 (or AD30VT - $240 )
Roland Cube 60 - $345 (or Roland Cube 30 - $230

Of those the Vox is the best clean, the Cube is the best distorted, the Crate is (arguably) the most user friendly and has the most effects. None are bad choices; it really depends on the type of music you're going for and the particular tone you're after.
#9
Wow.... 50 watt or more? Thats a bit too much for a practice amp (unless you don't want to use much distortion and going for clean). To play with good sounding distortion you will have to crank it up... and with 50 watts in a small room...
#11
Quote by Zetcher
Wow.... 50 watt or more? Thats a bit too much for a practice amp (unless you don't want to use much distortion and going for clean). To play with good sounding distortion you will have to crank it up... and with 50 watts in a small room...

You could go 500W SS and still have a perfectly decent practice amp- it doesn't really matter.
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#12
Quote by tubab0y
You could go 500W SS and still have a perfectly decent practice amp- it doesn't really matter.


I would disagree with that... I have a 75W messa and I can't get any real sound until it's 1/4 to 1/3 up and it gets loud (especially with a lot of gain). You can't really get the full sound with anything quieter them that
#13
ok sorry i didnt clarify enough, right now im just a beginner so i dont really need a pro sounding amp. yeah i dont really need much wattage cuz i just need to practice in my room.
#15
Quote by Zetcher
I would disagree with that... I have a 75W messa and I can't get any real sound until it's 1/4 to 1/3 up and it gets loud (especially with a lot of gain). You can't really get the full sound with anything quieter them that

Notice he said 500 watts SS. Solid-states like being quiet, other way round with your Mesa.