#1
Im considering moving to canada as i love the beautiful nature i see around the more mountainous regions, moreso towards the west, but close to US borders. I just have a few questions about like, whats it like living there? is it overcrowded like the U.S.? (more specifically the east coast). How does health care/taxes work? Whats the general cost of living/housing? just the basics...
#2
There are no mountains in on the east coast, but the rockies run through BC. Most of the population lives near the border but the upper parts of Canada are quite open and over crowding is rarely seen. The east coast is a beautiful place to live. There is a 7% federal tax and then each province has it's own additional tax (for example Ontario's is 7%, so you pay 14% total). As far as health care I only know about in Ontario and most things are covered by OHIP (Ontario health insurance plan), which means you get free doctor visits, eye and dental check-ups etc. Out west the housing market is nuts, and houses are way overpriced for what you get (especially in Alberta).

P.S.: I don't know where you live now, but the east coast has really bad winters including frequent snow storms and temperatures as low as -30 degrees celsius.
Last edited by sabbath1313 at Jul 30, 2007,
#3
Calgary is rediculously expensive to live in, but employment is abundant.

It varies from city to city.

Alberta has no PST though. Just the 6% GST.
#4
Quote by sabbath1313
There is a 7% federal tax


Stephen Harper lowered it to 6%
#5
Haha I just moved too Overcrowding isn't a problem depending on where you live. The difference you'll notice from the US is that the houses are a lot closer together, but basically within 600km of the US border the population density's pretty high, but north of that it's extremely sparse. Taxes can be pretty bad, combined tax on everything you buy is about 15 percent.
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#6
All those questions really depend on where exactly you want to move. If your looking at moving to western canada do you want to live in a big city or smaller city/town? Life in some of the bigger cities can be crowded but there is tons of open space after you leave their limits. In terms of housing prices, they are currently skyrocketing in the bigger cities throughout western canada and many people are finding it hard to buy/rent any property because of it.
Last edited by mentalwarfare at Jul 30, 2007,
#7
why does everyone think canada is like this huge forgien land with no population at alll and all it is is sceanary? it isnt. its populated like the us, the pictures you see are where no one lives or only places youd see if you went on a cruise. However i suggest you stay away from the praries and quebec...your best bet is ontario. The marintimes are ****, because they have terrible weather , bc,alberta type is terrible at winter time and vancouver is a huge drug place. The things i see on tv from this is terrible people doing heroine in the streets. your best bet is ontario.
#8
Quote by sargasm
Stephen Harper lowered it to 6%

You're right, and Ontario's PST is 8%, not 7% as I stated above.
#9
Quote by sabbath1313
There are no mountains in on the east coast, but the rockies run through BC. Most of the population lives near the border but the upper parts of Canada are quite open and over crowding is rarely seen. The east coast is a beautiful place to live. There is a 7% federal tax and then each province has it's own additional tax (for example Ontario's is 7%, so you pay 14% total). As far as health care I only know about in Ontario and most things are covered by OHIP (Ontario health insurance plan), which means you get free doctor visits, eye and dental check-ups etc. Out west the housing market is nuts, and houses are way overpriced for what you get (especially in Alberta).

P.S.: I don't know where you live now, but the east coast has really bad winters including frequent snow storms and temperatures as low as -30 degrees celsius.

There are the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec, they are quite nice however it is primarily a french speaking area.
#10
Quote by sabbath1313

P.S.: I don't know where you live now, but the east coast has really bad winters including frequent snow storms and temperatures as low as -30 degrees celsius.


Our winters arent that bad. It hardly goes below -20 where I live. I think you mean the prairies, they get the stream thing through there, and its pretty barren and can go over -40 (or so my geography teacher says).

Edit: My advice: Learn the metric system.
Last edited by Mudmen190 at Jul 30, 2007,
#11
i would sujest you move to the montreal subburbs, beautifull place to live, mostly english, things to do. concerts. close to the city. it's great
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#12
go somewhere in BC kinda near vancouver but not really
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#13
Quote by LP Addict
Im considering moving to canada as i love the beautiful nature i see around the more mountainous regions, moreso towards the west, but close to US borders. I just have a few questions about like, whats it like living there? is it overcrowded like the U.S.? (more specifically the east coast). How does health care/taxes work? Whats the general cost of living/housing? just the basics...

I live in Alberta, which is the richest Canadian province.

Calgary and Edmonton are becoming much more crowded than they were 5 to 10 years ago, but in places such as Red Deer, Medicine Hat and Lethbridge, there is still some very good housing available. Even with the growing population in Edmonton, there's absolutely no traffic unless you go right downtown during rush hour.

Healthcare is paid for by the government, through programs such as "OHIP" (That's what it's called in Ontario). Many companies will pay for the things that OHIP wouldn't cover, such as dental care and eye care. Taxes..well I don't pay taxes. In Alberta we only pay half of the sales tax that the other provinces do, as we don't pay PST.

Housing is very expensive in the bigger cities of Alberta. St. Albert is ridiculously overpriced, but compared to the US, I'd say the pricing of Canadian housing is quite good. Manitoba is very cheap housing..but a very boring place to be.
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#14
Taxes aren't bad, and the health care is really decent, although more doctors are leaving for private practices in America, making it really hard for those who don't have a doctor already to get one. Canada has a lot of land (obviously), yet our total population is about 30'000'000. I'm not sure, but isn't New York City about 1/3rd of that? Well anyways, there is a lot of country and small towns and cities. I live in London, Ontario, which is a city with a population of around 340'000 people. Not sure about the rest of the Country, but London is pretty cheap. I live in a house that is about $175 000 dollars, although when I lived with my mom we lived in a house priced at $60'000 and one worth $150'000. Toronto and Vancouver are the most expensive to live in.
#15
around ottawa, its freezing in the winter, its lowest is around -35 C but its odd that u get that, and in the summertime, it can seriously get cookin, today where i live was 30 C which is like 90-100 F i think lol
#17
Quote by sabbath1313
There are no mountains in on the east coast, but the rockies run through BC. Most of the population lives near the border but the upper parts of Canada are quite open and over crowding is rarely seen. The east coast is a beautiful place to live. There is a 7% federal tax and then each province has it's own additional tax (for example Ontario's is 7%, so you pay 14% total). As far as health care I only know about in Ontario and most things are covered by OHIP (Ontario health insurance plan), which means you get free doctor visits, eye and dental check-ups etc. Out west the housing market is nuts, and houses are way overpriced for what you get (especially in Alberta).

P.S.: I don't know where you live now, but the east coast has really bad winters including frequent snow storms and temperatures as low as -30 degrees celsius.
1. You mentioned sales tax. There is also income tax and property tax. The income tax is somewhere around 0% for $0 - $8,000. 15% for $8,000 - $36,000. 22% for 36,000 - x . I'm not sure about beyond those brackets.

Like most countries, the government taxes you when make your money and then taxes you again when you spend it. And you have to pay tax to own property (renters don't have to worry about that).

2. Some provinces *might* offer public dental care, but in Ontario there is no dental care. Since you mentioned OHIP I'm assuming you live in Ontario. We don't get free dental care here. Also, while most of your regular check-ups and many surgeries and procedures are covered by public health care, medications are not and many operations are not either. But your average visit to the doctor is covered. You have to pay for your medication out of pocket unless you buy private drug coverage. Also, I've heard that OHIP is also cutting back on various optometrist services which means that eye-care isn't free under every circumstance anymore. And AFAIK if you need glasses or contacts, they've never been covered. That's out of pocket or through private insurance as well. However, if you're dying in an emergency room at a hospital you won't be left to die because you don't have health coverage. That's the main benefit. The Hospitals are crummier though, don't pay their doctors as much, don't look as nice, don't smell as nice, aren't as pleasant to be in. But at least they're free (most of the time).