#1
Ok so I've found out where i want to go with my guitar playing, thanks to the extremely helpful UG Members.
But the problem is I dont know where to begin, I've found out that i want to gear my practive to learing the E aeolian scale and try to work on my picking and speed during it. Im about to send the order form for my metronome(decided to go with a Boss Dr Beat 30) and i should be picking up a microcube tomorrow if it isnt sold yet.
Some people suggested

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=FULL&scch=E&scchnam=Aeolian&get2=Get

which is really help full but its just patterns so....idk.
Should i just be practicing those patterns or is there a certain right way to learn scales?
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#3
so basicly just learn each patter?
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#4
No! Learn the notes or, better yet, the intervals for the scale you want to play in. That way, you can play that scale anywhere on the neck.
#5
^Learn both the notes and pattern. Notes are very important, but having the pattern burned into your muscle memory is very helpful too. It'll take years before you master the notes so that you can just throw out licks in any scale you want at lightning speed.

So yeah, both is the way to go!
Not only would it disrupt the fabric of time and space, but it would totally ruin the surprise!
#6
what are intervals?
this is so confusing, there's so much i dont know
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#8
Try to remember that Em = G major = E Aeolian, so if you know the 2 basic positions for each then youve already got 2 of the positions down!
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#9
Quote by AntwanL
what are intervals?
this is so confusing, there's so much i dont know


If you dont know ANY thoery, like what intervals are, you may want to start by just learning the pattern. Get your fingers on it, get your ears on it. Practice it through a little while, then start investigating it thoery wise, when your ready for it.

Here is a place that you could learn the patterns from:http://discoverguitaronline.com/videos/view/11
#10
Read what I said here about learning scales: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=637141


E Aeolian in particular? You are really just using the major scale in terms of fingering.
The first thing you should do is memorize the finger positions. Your choice -- either
the 5 CAGED positions or the 7 3 note per string positions. Or both. So you'd
be learning the G major scale fingerings.

Then I'd suggest memorizing E minor arpeggio fingerings. Overlay that over your
G Major scale and play around with "centering" the notes of G Major on the E minor
arpeggio notes. That will give you some of the flavor of E Aeolian.

You have to accept at the beginning you just have to do the rote memorization.
The above should only take a week or two.
#11
Quote by Peanut1614
Try to remember that Em = G major = E Aeolian, so if you know the 2 basic positions for each then youve already got 2 of the positions down!


To clarify before somebody flips out, the E aeolian scale (natural minor scale) and G ionian (major scale) share the same notes, but they are not the same scale. They are both modes of the same diatonic scale. That's not the absolute most important thing to know for someone with zero theory knowledge, but something that annoys a lot of regulars on this forum because it is incorrect information that is constantly repeated.

Like somebody said, learn both the notes all over the neck and the shapes, because it's a combination of these things that lets you really master the notes on the guitar.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
Last edited by sirpsycho85 at Jul 30, 2007,
#12
Quote by sirpsycho85

Like somebody said, learn both the notes all over the neck and the shapes, because it's a combination of these things that lets you really master the notes on the guitar.


You'll always find knowing the note names to be valuable, but how valuable depends
on what you're doing. For on the spot improvisation, they are much less valuable
than shapes. Shapes allow you to "see" scale degrees, chord tones and
relationships MUCH quicker. Nearly instantantaneously.

Improv can be broken down into 2 components: absolute and relative. Absolute
is where you set your frame of reference for the notes you're about to play.
Generally this is where you establish a key or key change and somethimes chord
changes. This is where knowing the notes on the fretboard helps. But its linear
thinking and its slower.

Relative is where, once you've established your reference frame, all the notes you
play are relative to that frame and to each other. Scale degrees and intervals
fall into the category and to a large extent chord tones and arpeggios. This is
where shapes reveal the hidden geometry of the fretboard and allow you to find
things instantly no matter where you happen to be. This is where real fluidity
and self-expression come in because you don't "think" shapes, you "see and feel"
them.

Naturally, you'd want to be playing relative as much as possible, and if your theory
knowledge goes deep enough I think you can for almost everything. However,
for most of us its some mixture of the two. But even so, playing in the relative
mode should far surpasse absolute in live playing.

The key to relative is shapes. Not just shapes in isolation. You also have to "see"
shapes overlayed on other shapes and relationships between shapes.
#13
Quote by sirpsycho85
To clarify before somebody flips out, the E aeolian scale (natural minor scale) and G ionian (major scale) share the same notes, but they are not the same scale. They are both modes of the same diatonic scale. That's not the absolute most important thing to know for someone with zero theory knowledge, but something that annoys a lot of regulars on this forum because it is incorrect information that is constantly repeated.

Like somebody said, learn both the notes all over the neck and the shapes, because it's a combination of these things that lets you really master the notes on the guitar.


I know that, different tonal centres etc. but keep it simple for the guy eh? Think of it as a 'lie to children' (no offense to the TS!) they need to know something before they can later be told something else to explain why its wrong...

And yes to the second paragraph thats definatly the easiest and most effective way of doing it, also try learning some arpeggio shapes of the scale as this can help when your soloing.
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.