#1
i was wondering if anyone knows how to play the Tri-Chord?
I did a google search on it but no luck.
If some one could post a tab for it or a link to a tab for it that would be awesome.
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#2
I'm not sure what you mean by "Tri-Chord". I spent several years at University studying music theory, so... wtf are you trying to figure out?
#3
I watched the Metal: A Headbangers Journey and they talked about the use of the Tri-Chord in metal and how it came from classical music.
Its supposed to be a really dark sound, they also refered to it as "the devils note"
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#4
You mean tritone.


Diminished Fifth.


Look up songs like Black Sabbath by Sabbath and the intro to YYZ by Rush.
you will fight death as you slowly realize...
#5
do you mean a chord made up of the root...the third..and the 5th?

'cause if so its basically a barre chord..
Quote by yawn
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#6
Yeah i saw that film and i think he means tri-tone. It is just a diminished fifth, it sounds pretty evil alright. Play it like this:

D:--5--
A:--4-- <-- That's a tritone!
E:--3--
#7
ya thats what it was, tri-tone, i saw it a while ago so i guess in my mind just replaced tone with chord
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#9
so do i just play it like a power chord? or...???
how do i play that(i feel like a total noob right now lol)
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#10
Quote by ZootCst
ah... tritone. That makes more sense. Cool interval, it's a diminished 5th.

Only some of the time. Depends on which scale/mode your talking about.

to use it as a power/minor bar chord, just diminish the the second note of the chord once (ie the "fifth" if you know your intervals).
so: ________Becomes

--5------5--------
--5------4--------
--5------5--------
--7------7--------
--7------6--------
--5------5--------


You dont have to play the e and B string if it gets hard and only play the E A D strings if you want a powerchord style chord.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Jul 30, 2007,
#11
Quote by demonofthenight


--5------5--------
--5------4--------
--5------5--------
--7------7--------
--7------6--------
--5------5--------


Then, for the rest of us with only 5 fingers on each hand, it can be played with fewer notes... But much of the time it is played as a relation between two chords, especially in metal, ie: E5 followed by Bb5. This takes the flat fifth of the blues scale and uses it for a chord. At this point we're straying from traditional music theory.
#12
Quote by ZootCst
, ie: E5 followed by Bb5. This takes the flat fifth of the blues scale and uses it for a chord. At this point we're straying from traditional music theory.


That was alittle much for my noob ears and guitar noob brain, so what exactly is going on there? and is E5 and Bb5
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#13
IF you play a 0 then a 6 on 1 string that'll sort you out :P Its used alot in metal as it says in the film...
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#14
omg guys lets get this right, this is embarasing to guitarists everywhere. The tritone IS a trichord. It's made up of 1 flat 3 flat 5. A trichord is any chord having 3 degrees played simultaneously, and doesn't have to be 135 exclusively though this is the most common form. The tritone is more correctly named a dimminished trichrod, is most often found in harmonic and melodic minor quality pieces/ songs, hence its relation to metal. This is the stuff you learn in year one of any instrument.

The actual shape is usually (on EAD strings in standard) frets 975 root on E, 675 root on A, and 645 root on D.

E5 or any "5 chord" is a power chord, this one is played with root on E... so Open string 6 or sting 4 fret 2 etc.

So the b5 of the blues scale he's talking about is the one note that turns every pentatonic box shape into a blues scale by adding a 6th degree in between the perfect 4 and 5 of the pentatonic scale. You basically bastardize the "perfect" stable sound by putting in a note that clearly, to the ear, doesn't normally belong.
Last edited by dropdead at Mar 19, 2013,
#15
Dude. 6 year old necro-bump. Take a look at the last post date next time before you post.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#16
Quote by dropdead
omg guys lets get this right, this is embarasing to guitarists everywhere. The tritone IS a trichord. It's made up of 1 flat 3 flat 5. This is the stuff you learn in year one of any instrument.

Except that's not quite right. R b3 b5 is a diminished TRIAD.

A TRITONE is an interval made up of two notes separated by a distance of three (tri) tones (tone) hence the name tritone. It could also be a called diminished fifth or an augmented fourth depending on the specific note names.

The diminished triad contains a tritone between the R and b5. But you can also find a tritone in the dominant seventh chord between the major third and minor seventh of the chord.

This is all year one stuff in any instrument.
Si
#17
If you're going to necro-bump a thread with information that TS will likely never see, at least have your facts straight.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#19
The tritone allows the use of the lydian mode.
Maria from west side story uses the tritone in the melody.
"Mar-IIII-AAA"
The IIII is the tritone
The lydian mode is a favorite by artists such as Satch and Vai. It really has a nice dreamy quality to it. You can play it by taking the regular major scale and starting it on the fourth. That means you don't even need to memorize new patterns!
I personally like to think of it as a major scale with an augmented fourth, but whatever works.
#20
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#22
Quote by macashmack
The tritone allows the use of the lydian mode.
Maria from west side story uses the tritone in the melody.
"Mar-IIII-AAA"
The IIII is the tritone
The lydian mode is a favorite by artists such as Satch and Vai. It really has a nice dreamy quality to it. You can play it by taking the regular major scale and starting it on the fourth. That means you don't even need to memorize new patterns!
I personally like to think of it as a major scale with an augmented fourth, but whatever works.


You can also use the locrian mode, diminished scale, and phrygian dominant.
But this thread is dumb and necro'd. Close pls
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#23
Quote by macashmack
Cmon u kno Im right

That wasn't directed at you so much as the person who resurrected this thread, and the thread itself.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#24
How awful threads did UG have in 2007 lol...
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#25
Quote by macashmack
The tritone allows the use of the lydian mode.
Maria from west side story uses the tritone in the melody.
"Mar-IIII-AAA"
The IIII is the tritone
The lydian mode is a favorite by artists such as Satch and Vai. It really has a nice dreamy quality to it. You can play it by taking the regular major scale and starting it on the fourth. That means you don't even need to memorize new patterns!
I personally like to think of it as a major scale with an augmented fourth, but whatever works.


yes because IIII = IV = 4 and 4 is the lydian mode

it's all elementary, guys
modes are a social construct
#26
Quote by MaggaraMarine
How awful threads did UG have in 2007 lol...

Almost as bad as these days.
#29
Quote by dropdead
omg guys lets get this right, this is embarasing to guitarists everywhere. The tritone IS a trichord. It's made up of 1 flat 3 flat 5. A trichord is any chord having 3 degrees played simultaneously, and doesn't have to be 135 exclusively though this is the most common form. The tritone is more correctly named a dimminished trichrod, is most often found in harmonic and melodic minor quality pieces/ songs, hence its relation to metal. This is the stuff you learn in year one of any instrument.

The actual shape is usually (on EAD strings in standard) frets 975 root on E, 675 root on A, and 645 root on D.

E5 or any "5 chord" is a power chord, this one is played with root on E... so Open string 6 or sting 4 fret 2 etc.

So the b5 of the blues scale he's talking about is the one note that turns every pentatonic box shape into a blues scale by adding a 6th degree in between the perfect 4 and 5 of the pentatonic scale. You basically bastardize the "perfect" stable sound by putting in a note that clearly, to the ear, doesn't normally belong.

your post is almost six years late and sucks a big one to boot

why didn't you mention modes here so you can get three strikes in one go
Quote by MaggaraMarine
How awful threads did UG have in 2007 lol...

hi have you visited these forums recently, how's this any worse
Last edited by :-D at Mar 20, 2013,
#30
Quote by Withorwithout
Let's get things straight lol. Tritone is a major third, wut?

Were you referring to my post in which I stated that the tritone is an interval made up of a distance of three tones? Just to clarify a distance of three tones is equal to a distance of six semitones.

Or were you referring to when I said there was a tritone between the major third and minor seventh in a dominant chord?
C E G Bb The major third is E the minor seventh is Bb; the distance between E and Bb is a tritone.

Or maybe you weren't talking about my post at all. Though I didn't see a major third mentioned anywhere else and your confusion worries me.

===

Anyone else think that equal temperament tuning results in the best sounding tritone?
Sure the perfect fifths and major thirds are slightly "out", but that tritone is bang on.

It's only using equal temperament I have ever been able to use the tritone so open the vortex to hell.
Si
#31
Quote by :-D
your post is almost six years late and sucks a big one to boot

why didn't you mention modes here so you can get three strikes in one go

hi have you visited these forums recently, how's this any worse

OK, maybe the threads were just a bit different in 2007. Maybe I'm used to how people post today.
Quote by AlanHB
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#32
I stand massively corrected..
The important lesson here is not the tritone, but that the post button is a dangerous weapon in the hands of untrained idiots who don't know what they're doing or talking about
Wheeeeeeeee.......ooooo
#33
Do you guyz noe how to play a demented 13th?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#34
Time to stir the pot a bit more.

Isn't what's being described as a "tritone", a simple diminished chord, or stacked minor thirds.

Since this chord can take the name of any note in it, it's kind of hard to attach it to a specific mode. Plus, this chord occurs naturally when pulling a triad, beginning on the natural 7th, of any major scale.

If you stack major 3rds, you get an "augmented" chord.

Or did I fail music 101 also?

And BTW, if you stack an additional minor 3rd, you get a diminished 7th chord.
Same for the augmented chord.
#35
And BTW, if you stack an additional minor 3rd, you get a diminished 7th chord.
Same for the augmented chord.


That is not how augmented 7th chords work.
#37
Quote by Captaincranky
Time to stir the pot a bit more.

Isn't what's being described as a "tritone", a simple diminished chord, or stacked minor thirds.

Since this chord can take the name of any note in it, it's kind of hard to attach it to a specific mode. Plus, this chord occurs naturally when pulling a triad, beginning on the natural 7th, of any major scale.

If you stack major 3rds, you get an "augmented" chord.

Or did I fail music 101 also?

And BTW, if you stack an additional minor 3rd, you get a diminished 7th chord.
Same for the augmented chord.

Yip i think you failed music 101 as well.

Tritone is an interval NOT a chord it's an interval made up of three tones. A tone is the equivalent of two semitones. Tritone refers to the distance of three whole tones between the two notes of the interval.

a diminished triad is root b3 and b5 made by stacking a minor third and minor third.
It is wrong to say that it can take the name of any note in it.

E.G. Edim triad = E G Bb if you use G as the root then it is G Bb E (root, minor third, Maj 6th) You would not call it G diminished triad you would call it an Edim triad over a g bass note or an E dim triad in first inversion.

However...you are correct in that this chord is diatonic to the major scale. It is formed when harmonizing the leading tone of that scale.

A diminshed seventh chord however is another diminished third and the root can be any note in the chord - Edim7 = E G Bb Db Gdim7 = G Bb Db Fb Bbdim7 = Bb Db Fb Abb they are enharmonic

The Augmented triad is two major thirds stacked to get R 3 #5
In A that would be A C# E#
If you stack another major third you would get a G## which is enharmonic to the root A so it would just be a doubling of the root.

C#aug is enharmonic to Aaug and E#aug. A+ = A C# E#. C#aug = C# E# G## etc etc.

Neither the dimished seventh chord or the augmented triad are diatonic.
Si
#38
Quote by 20Tigers
Yip i think you failed music 101 as well.
Perhaps, but not completely

Quote by 20Tigers
A diminshed seventh chord however is another diminished third and the root can be any note in the chord - Edim7 = E G Bb Db Gdim7 = G Bb Db Fb Bbdim7 = Bb Db Fb Abb they are enharmonic
So then you CAN name diminished7th chords for any note in them?

Quote by 20Tigers
C#aug is enharmonic to Aaug and E#aug. A+ = A C# E#. C#aug = C# E# G## etc etc.
So you can name an augmented TRIAD for any note in it?

But 4 semis, plus 4 semis, plus 4 semis, equals 12 semis, the notes of the chromatic scale. I can't help but see the errors of my calculations with that one.


Admittedly some confusion in the details, so then a "D" maybe.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 2, 2013,
#39
yip not a complete fail but yeah you got it now.



The fully diminished seventh chord splits the octave into 4 equal parts.
The Augmented triad splits the octave into 3equal parts.
The Tritone interval splits the octave into 2 equal parts


Cdim7
[B][color="Red"]C[/COLOR][/B] Db D [B][color="Red"]Eb[/COLOR][/B] E F [B][color="Red"]Gb[/COLOR][/B] G Ab [B][color="Red"]Bbb[/COLOR][/B] Bb B [B][color="Red"]C[/COLOR][/B]

CAug
[B][color="Green"]C[/COLOR][/B] C# D D# [B][color="Green"]E[/COLOR][/B] F F# G [B][color="Green"]G#[/COLOR][/B] A A# B [B][color="Green"]C[/COLOR][/B]


Tritone
[B][color="Blue"]C[/COLOR][/B] C# D D# E F [B][color="Blue"]F#[/COLOR][/B] G G# A A# B [B][color="Blue"]C[/COLOR][/B]

For each of them the inversions are enharmonic to the root position. (they tend to get named by the lowest note when no context is given or by way of context when context is given.

EDIT: Also with those you can resolve each of them in the same way to a different place.

The tritone C-F# can resolve inward by a half step to C# F (Db F) which is a major third in a D major chord. Or it can resolve with each note moving in the opposite direction to give you G B (major third in G major). -This is the basic principle underlying the tritone substitution.

The fully diminished seventh chord is pretty much two tritones a minor third apart. You can resolve either of those tritones to the major third to tonicize a major triad. You have a choice of four different options

C Eb F# Bbb can resolve to a major chord with a root a half step above any of those notes. C# E G or Bb


An Augmented Triad can resolve by any of the individual notes moving down a half step to create a major triad. Or any note can move up half step to create a minor triad.

C E G# - CEG - CMaj
or
C E G# - C#EG# - C#m
or
E G# B# - E G# B - EMaj
or
E G# B# - F Ab C - Fm

So theoretically it would be possible they can be used as a pivot chords for modulation.

They are some pretty funky sounding chords though so you really need to get creative to be able to use them effectively.
Si