#1


Theres the guitar



Theres the problem. I picked this up from someone today for 200 dollars plus a hardcase and when i got home i sh1t myself when i saw that these are 3,500 dollars new. I want to fix this, and id like to do it myself if at all possible. what kind of glue/what kind of clamp/what kind of conditions/procedure? I appreciate it.
#2
*shrugs* im no luthier
i just wanted to see the guitar XD
ask someone smart
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#3
Just good ol' fashioned wood glue should be fine. As far as clamping, I don't know of a great way of clamping he joint without damaging the wood. I'm thinking that if you could wrap something around it, such as a belt or a ratchet strap, and let it hold the joint tight while the glue dried you should be fine.
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#4
yea wood glue should hold it, ir that doesnt work theres always ductape
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#5
take off all the strings first.

then glue it, and somehow, clamp it. leave it for a day or two, and TADA!!! you got yourself a very nice guitar.
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#6
Take it to a luthier, if the guitar is worth $3,500 it is well worth the money tp get the job done properly.
#7
can anyone recommend a wood glue that they have used in the past? I have long belts that i could use to hold it and i would wrap the body in a cloth as to keep the finish perfect. the guitar looks brand new except for the neck peeling off.
#8
I would counter sink a decent screw, (coach bolt), into each side (keeping the shavings that come out when you drill), then using the wood shavings mash them up till a fine powder is achieved & use some clear glue (super glue would do in a pinch). preferably something that dries hard so it can be sanded , mix the glue with the wood powder & fill the hole (just a little overfull) then very carfully sand it off. Stick some wood glue in the break as well. Leave it for a day & it should serve you for many years.
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#9
No, I would not screw the neck. Due to the value of the guitar it will be THOROUGHLY examined prior to purchase. I'm sorry, but someone will spot that work right away. We use Elmer's wood glue at work, it should be plenty strong.
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#10
Quote by dave293
Take it to a luthier, if the guitar is worth $3,500 it is well worth the money tp get the job done properly.

One attaboy for you Dave. Best advice in this thread.

Elmer's glue, and the like will NOT work.
There is an incredible amount of stress on this joint.
In addition, a fixture will be needed to force the joint closed very hard, without damaging the guitar, while the glue hardens.

This is not child's play.
If the guitar has high value, you don't want to make it worse with a botched repair.
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#12
Have you ever actually used Elmer's wood glue? It is nothing like every 6-year-old's favorite food, glue all. Any quality wood glue will be stronger than the wood you are gluing.

Maybe it's the carpenter in me, but I know that that joint could be properly repaired without the need for a luthier. In doing so, would avoid (1) trusting someone else with my investment and (2) throwing away money when the job could have been performed equally well by myself.

Of course, it's not my guitar, and I'm not the one repairing it, I'm just saying that taking it to a luthier for that repair seems pointless...
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#13
But the reason I recommended taking it in is the job isn't as simple as squirting some glue in and clamping.

Titebond or any other AR glue does not hold well is there is old glue or other imperfections in the the joint. The joint will need to be cleaned properly, probably requiring a full neck reset.

Screwing the neck back on was terrible advice.
#14
Good point. The picture makes the joint appear extremely clean. Of course, that's just one picture. I think that it could be possible to repair the neck without doing a reset, by removing as much of the previous glue as possible with sandpaper, then attempting to re-glue. Again, we reach the point where it's not my guitar, it's not my time, and it's not my money. I'm so poor anymore all I can think of is how to save money. Why do cars have to be so expensive???
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#15
Quote by AngusX
Have you ever actually used Elmer's wood glue? It is nothing like every 6-year-old's favorite food, glue all. Any quality wood glue will be stronger than the wood you are gluing.

Maybe it's the carpenter in me, but I know that that joint could be properly repaired without the need for a luthier. In doing so, would avoid (1) trusting someone else with my investment and (2) throwing away money when the job could have been performed equally well by myself.

Of course, it's not my guitar, and I'm not the one repairing it, I'm just saying that taking it to a luthier for that repair seems pointless...
Yes, as a matter of fact I have used Elmer's glue extensively.

  • - Elmer's glue is too thick. It won't permeate the wood as well as a proper glue for this kind of work.
  • - Elmer's glue has poor tensile strength. Look at the joint. This will be very important in this application
  • - Elmer's glue weakens over time in humid environments.


In addition to using a proper adhesive, this joint needs to be prepped. Also a suitable fixture would need to be made to squeeze the joint together tightly while the glue dries. Even the slightest gap with a high quality adhesive will cause failure.

If this is repaired and fails again, there will be more tearout from the areas where the glue held well. The joint will become even more ragged. Repairing a joint like this, is even more difficult than making the joint in the first place. Repairing a botched repair is far worse.

This is the kind of repair and amateur should try on a $100 guitar, not on something of value.
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#16
Well i was thinking of the poor guy being able to play it. As far as bieng worth $3500 it isnt worth zip in its present condition. O.K. A screw though the heel might be brutal , but certainly would fix its present condition , O.K. you have a problem with the screw entry being detectable, so use a strap pin as a cover & screw straight through it into the heel through it & into the mounting block that with abit of woodglue in the crack would still have it up & running in a day with an undetectable job. Whether brutal or otherwise job done.
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#17
I'm backing the advice of taking it to a decent luthier. That guitar is beautiful and I would hate to see it devalued/ruined by amateurish work. It'll be worth it in the long run. I doubt he'd even charge that much, it's not a hard job, just worth being done professionally.
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#18
Guys, Dave has built/repaired/handled more guitars in his life than any of you. If he says take it to a luthier, take it to a luthier.
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#19
Is that one of those Martin CF-1s (Or some other model...), the all wooden one? The only metal on it are the tuning machines, strings, pickup innards and electronics. All knobs, pickup covers, etc are ebony...

AM I right? If so, that's absolutely beautiful for what you paid - get it repaired by a luthier and check their resale prices. That is if you don't want it for yourself...
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#20
i just called my dads friend who builds guitars in the gibson factory. hes coming into town in a month or so for some family visiting, he said he could fix this in a day or so and wont charge me!
#21
Almost everyone has missed the real point here. That joint originally wasn't just a glue-on to the body. Some other aspect of the joint that you can't see from the photo has apparently failed. What you see is the end result of that failure. You must treat the cause, not the symptom, so to speak.

BTW, that construction method typically uses glues that can be softened using steam injection at a later date just in case the neck has to be removed for more extensive repair. Wood glue will not allow that.

A trip to a competent luthier is a must, or else you destroy the guitar's value. If you elect to repair it on the cheap, you may retain the playability, but nothing else.
#22
Quote by LP Addict
i just called my dads friend who builds guitars in the gibson factory. hes coming into town in a month or so for some family visiting, he said he could fix this in a day or so and wont charge me!


lucky little ****.
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