#1
The questions I have are, first you raise the 6th and 7th degrees,a half step, of the original minor scale , my question is why, and why do you do the same to the harmonic minor (the 7th degree only though). The second question is why does the ascending melodic minor raise the 6th and 7th degrees another half step (whole step over all)?

If anyone can help me it'd be appreciated, if I have something wrong with the theory, or if something is unclear (I'm tired right now), I posted above please correct me.

-edit- just realized i posted this in the wrong area, if someone will move it to the correct place that'd be better.
Smart Real Estate Invenstor
#2
Mate, you're making easy things too complicated.
First there is the original minor scale, or natural minor.

To make a harmonic minor, you sharp by half step the 7th degree of the natural minor. Why? To get a different scale, a different sounding scale.

In Melodic minor going up, ascending, whatever, you sharp by half step the 6th and 7th degree of the natural minor, and descending you "unsharp" the 6th and 7th degrees. Or easier : Ascending - Melodic Minor; Descending - Natural minor. Why do they do this? Classical composers think it sounds better then you descend in natural minor. It isn't necessary to do this however, some people play up and down melodic minor. It's only necessary if you're doing classical theory or something.

Hope I cleared something up.
#3
Cleared up a little bit thanks, the question I had with why you sharp it I meant how it relates to the C Major scale. I kind of anal when it comes to things like this I just want to know exactly why it sharps. Rather than just telling myself it just does.
Smart Real Estate Invenstor
#4
It doesn't really relate to the C Major scale, it's a minor after all. Would be more correct how it relates to A minor scale. (A minor also has no accidentals.)

As to why it sharps, I don't think anyone can answer that. It's like asking why the major scale is "Tone, Tone, Semitone, Tone, Tone, Tone, Semitone" , the distance between notes that is. It just sounds Majorish, happy to our ear. and "TsTTsTT", the distances between the notes in natural minor scale, just sounds minorish, sad to our ear. That's my take on it.

Let's see if someone more proficient in theory than me answers. xD
#5
Quote by GuitarSpike
I kind of anal when it comes to things like this I just want to know exactly why it sharps. Rather than just telling myself it just does.


That sort of question goes back into history that most people probably don't know and most people don't care about.

It's all got to do with the way the old classical composers approached harmony, it think tha melodic minor evolved from the needs of vocalists for easier jumps while singing, as for the harmonic minor I think someone just thought it would sound better that way, but I wouldn't quote me on that if I were you.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
The harmonic minor has a raised 7th to allow for a dominant chord to be built on it's fifth degree. In Aeolian, you have a v - i movement, an example would be G-7 (G - Bb - D - F) - C-7.

The minor 3rd of the v chord is the minor 7th of the tonic chord, if we raise this half a step, we get G - B - D - F, a G7 chord - which allows for a stronger V - i movement & more pronounced resolution such as G7 - C-Δ, or more commonly in harmonic minor, G7b9 - C-Δ.

Ascending the melodic minor scale mimics the major scale and melodically allows for the strongest possible resolution to the tonic (a half step from the leading tone such as B - C in C melodic minor), as you descend - resolving to the tonic is not an issue, and Aeolian allows for a strong minor function such as minor 6th - perfect 5th (b6 - 5).

The reason we also use melodic minor in both directions is because of it's melodic stability and harmonic potential - when we're playing over a tonic minor chord (C-, C-Δ - the major 6th and major 7th offer stable chord extensions - the minor sixth from natural minor/harmonic minor clashes with the 5th of the chord (Ab over a G in C-), and playing the minor 7th with no minor 6th would give us a Dorian tonic chord, or a ii chord in a major key - which is not what we want when we're playing on a tonic minor chord.

Also, it might be better to post something like this in Musician Talk next time!!


#7
Quote by Johnljones7443
The harmonic minor has a raised 7th to allow for a dominant chord to be built on it's fifth degree. In Aeolian, you have a v - i movement, an example would be G-7 (G - Bb - D - F) - C-7.

The minor 3rd of the v chord is the minor 7th of the tonic chord, if we raise this half a step, we get G - B - D - F, a G7 chord - which allows for a stronger V - i movement & more pronounced resolution such as G7 - C-Δ, or more commonly in harmonic minor, G7b9 - C-Δ.

Ascending the melodic minor scale mimics the major scale and melodically allows for the strongest possible resolution to the tonic (a half step from the leading tone such as B - C in C melodic minor), as you descend - resolving to the tonic is not an issue, and Aeolian allows for a strong minor function such as minor 6th - perfect 5th (b6 - 5).

The reason we also use melodic minor in both directions is because of it's melodic stability and harmonic potential - when we're playing over a tonic minor chord (C-, C-Δ - the major 6th and major 7th offer stable chord extensions - the minor sixth from natural minor/harmonic minor clashes with the 5th of the chord (Ab over a G in C-), and playing the minor 7th with no minor 6th would give us a Dorian tonic chord, or a ii chord in a major key - which is not what we want when we're playing on a tonic minor chord.

Also, it might be better to post something like this in Musician Talk next time!!




Now that is what i call an answer.
Wiser Is Better
"Go Get Your Gun Because Your God Won't Show"