#1
When I pluck the D and A strings, the top E string still vibrates even though nothing has touched it. This results in an anoying open E drone. Any ideas?
#2
Go to guitar dealer...sure theyll fix it in no-time.
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#3
My idea is that you simply mute the E string. Its not uncommon for that to happen.
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#4
i believe its harmony? i might be wrong



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#5
Physically what could be happening is that the natural frequency of the E string is very similar to that of the wave created from the A and D strings.

The interference of the sound waves of the other two strings produces one sound wave. This may have a frequency close to that of the E string, causing it to oscillate and therefore produce it's own sound.
The frequency is the pitch of the sound, therefore maybe if you test the sound that the A and D string produce together (on a tuner) and it says E, Eb or E#, or somewhere round there, you may have a physics answer.

But in terms of why it happens only on your guitar (and if what i have stated above is true in this case); Don't know, good luck.
#8
Quote by jast
Physically what could be happening is that the natural frequency of the E string is very similar to that of the wave created from the A and D strings.

The interference of the sound waves of the other two strings produces one sound wave. This may have a frequency close to that of the E string, causing it to oscillate and therefore produce it's own sound.
The frequency is the pitch of the sound, therefore maybe if you test the sound that the A and D string produce together (on a tuner) and it says E, Eb or E#, or somewhere round there, you may have a physics answer.

But in terms of why it happens only on your guitar (and if what i have stated above is true in this case); Don't know, good luck.


Pretty much exactly right, as for why it happends on his guitar, I am guessing the shape, wood and design of the guitar amplify the wave from the A/D string (or atleast carry them better than other guitars) so it is more apparent here.
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#9
so basically the only thing you can do is learn to mute the string, or strings, that you don't want to ring out as you play.
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#10
harmonics

play the natural harmonic at the 7th fret on the A string
thats the same note as the high E

and when you play the open A string, that resonates through the bridge into the E and makes it start moving as well
#11
You should learn to mute all of the strings you're not playing on. It's a good habit to get into.
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