#1
I'm getting a new laptop in a few days and I was thinking about installing Ubuntu on it but the only thing I'm concerned about is if some of the programs I use now will work on it. My old choir teacher, who plays guitar, uses Ubuntu Studio on one of his computers for recording and I haven't heard anything bad about it from him and he says it's great for recording.

Well my current solution is to partition the hard drive so that I have both OS's installed. So I would use Vista for the programs I use at school and Ubuntu for recording and other stuff. My question is basically if anyone has any experience with Ubuntu/Vista or running two different OS's with a laptop that has Vista preloaded.

If you haven't had any experience with either of the two systems please don't state false rumors or anything you have heard from other people.

Thanks.

P.S. For those of you who don't know about Ubuntu, it's a Linux based operating system which is totally free and can be downloaded from www.ubuntu.com. I also found a nice article which compared features of the two systems and was not biased towards any - if you want to read more about it. http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=199201179
#2
Ubuntu FTW. I've used many, right now i'm running slackware at home, but Ubuntu is great.
Quote by bakk
Hi,
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Proud owner of a 1987 Kramer Baretta I w/ spider Guitart.
#3
For your situation, I'd pick Windows XP.

The reason is you can get the best of both worlds. Not only will you have no compatibility issues, but you can torrent cracked music production programs, which are mostly Windows XP versions.

This way, you can get all the common programs while also getting the best/most widely used music programs (Sibelius 4, Cakewalk Sonar, Fruity Loops, etc) for free and run without any hassle.
#4
Quote by poopt
For your situation, I'd pick Windows XP.

The reason is you can get the best of both worlds. Not only will you have no compatibility issues, but you can torrent cracked music production programs, which are mostly Windows XP versions.

This way, you can all the common programs while also getting the best/most widely used music programs (Sibelius 4, Cakewalk Sonar, Fruity Loops, etc) for free and run without any hassle.

+1
#5
ubuntu
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
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#6
Also, if you plan on buying music programs, which average about $400 a piece, I'd recommend Vista. This is because with a legit copy of the music programs, most of them will be Vista compatible, or at least have Vista updates in the future. And again, programs for Windows/Macs are going to be the most widely used and best designed, so you can share your works with others and get quality results.

Oh and if you get serious with recording, you're going to end up buying external hardwares such as Audio and MIDI interfaces. Most of these have drivers that are for Windows and Macs exclusively. So due to these reasons, I don't recommend Linux at all.
Last edited by poopt at Aug 5, 2007,
#7
I'm actually running Ubuntu/Vista at the moment. Partitioned hard drive with a 300GB USB drive. Works fine! But what programs do you actually need for school (or whatever it was)? If it's just Word, Excel etc. you could use OpenOffice instead (on Ubuntu). Much better than the now-impossible-to-use Office '07 which I guess will come with your Vista.
#8
Shades of Grey... nice instrumental bro... Also liked the progression u gave on ur profile of your journey away from pop crap to true rock and classical music. I'm about halfway there...
#9
Quote by Black_Fender
Shades of Grey... nice instrumental bro... Also liked the progression u gave on ur profile of your journey away from pop crap to true rock and classical music. I'm about halfway there...

Thanks...cept I don't consider pop crap or inferior in any way now. If you read the thing, I said now I welcome all styles, and I don't dismiss any of them. Also, comment in my thread if you can, thanks.
#10
First of all, make sure you get the Vista CD with your laptop. Trust me, it sounds silly, but I work on the Tesco's electrical department, and the **** they give us sometimes come without the discs. And don't do anything with the laptop (i.e. store files on it, install new programs) until you've completed the dual boot process. Otherwise, if you screw up the partitioning, you'll lose those files.

Btw, I'm only assuming that you haven't dual booted before.

And also, if you still want the compatibility of an XP machine, you could always get a Windows Emulator for Ubuntu. It's up to you. Or you could triple boot XP, Vista and Ubuntu lol. The possibilities are endless.....with a decent boot loader.
#11
If you do decide to multi-boot, which I find unnecessary in your case, make sure you install XP before anything else. XP is a stubborn bitch when it comes to multi-booting. Trust me, I learned that the hard way.
#12
Dual booting is actually really easy with Vista. Even I could do it!

Vista comes with a hard drive partitioning manager thing - just take away some disk from Windows and leave it empty. Load Ubuntu off a boot disk, and install it (as I recall it defaults to install on the free space). Really that's it!

But do some proper research into what you're doing first. I'll see if I can find any of the links I found useful for you.
#14
Well the laptop I'm looking at right now has a 160GB hard drive and 2 GB of RAM so I guess partitioning it wouldn't be much of a problem. I have considered using XP instead of Vista, which I probably will do in the long run but I wanted to try out Vista and see how it works for me. So do Torrent programs work on Vista? Also could anyone tell me the process of how to dual boot. I've only heard of this, never done it before. Just to clear this up - dual boot means that I would have both OS's right?

Edit: Thanks for the link Bluesbreaker7, I've read all about the Ubuntu features - I always like to be 100% sure about these things before I mess around with it.
Last edited by sam_S92 at Aug 5, 2007,
#15
Quote by poopt
Thanks...cept I don't consider pop crap or inferior in any way now. If you read the thing, I said now I welcome all styles, and I don't dismiss any of them. Also, comment in my thread if you can, thanks.


Yeah I still listen to pop as well. I appreciate some of its musical aspects, I'm just trying to pull away from it and focus more on stuff like Hendrix and Iron Maiden, which is better for me in the long run as a guitarist.
#16
Yes, two OSs. Basically you get an extra choice when you start up the computer between booting into Linux or Windows Vista (Ubuntu comes with a boot loader which should be fine for your purposes, so you won't need any other things unless you want extra functionality).

Yeah, torrents work on Vista.
#17
XP + Ubuntu is your way to go, XP > Vista for me. I have XP and Fedora 7 installed and I have no problems with either of them, so it's the way you want to go. Vista's got nothing on XP, all I like about Vista are some visual improvements, but download themes and you're done.
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#18
Quote by sam_S92
Well the laptop I'm looking at right now has a 160GB hard drive and 2 GB of RAM so I guess partitioning it wouldn't be much of a problem. I have considered using XP instead of Vista, which I probably will do in the long run but I wanted to try out Vista and see how it works for me. So do Torrent programs work on Vista? Also could anyone tell me the process of how to dual boot. I've only heard of this, never done it before. Just to clear this up - dual boot means that I would have both OS's right?

Yes, torrent programs work for Vista. I recommend uTorrent.

Also, what you were talking about in your starting post WAS dual booting. You partition the drives and install a separate OS on each. When you start up your computer, you'll get a menu that allows you to select which OS to boot.

Like I said, to multi-boot in any combination of OS's, make sure you install XP first. Vista is quite multi-boot-friendly and I assume Linux is too. There isn't much to do to set up a multi-boot system. Just partition the hard drive, 1 partition for each OS. Install XP first (if you want to), then Vista and Linux. You will automatically get a boot menu after installing the OS's.

I suggest trying out Vista on a different computer. Unless your laptop is equipped with the latest and greatest hardwares, Vista won't run very well. I still recommend XP to you and think that you should not dual boot between Windows and Linux because it's a disadvantage to music production.
#19
How much of an effect would dual-booting have on the speed of the computer? Would it be smart to partition the hard drive into halves? like 80GB for Vista and 80GB for Ubuntu?
#20
Quote by Black_Fender
Yeah I still listen to pop as well. I appreciate some of its musical aspects, I'm just trying to pull away from it and focus more on stuff like Hendrix and Iron Maiden, which is better for me in the long run as a guitarist.

I understand. And yes, rock is a more suitable genre for a guitarist. If you want to improve your guitar playing even further, I suggest learning jazz or classical or both.
#21
Quote by sam_S92
How much of an effect would dual-booting have on the speed of the computer? Would it be smart to partition the hard drive into halves? like 80GB for Vista and 80GB for Ubuntu?

It won't affect the speed or performance of the computer.

And as for partitioning, it doesn't necessarily have to be 50/50. For example, I boot between Vista and XP. I have XP exclusively for music productions. Because I use XP for such limited scope, I only alloted about 15GB for it while allotting Vista the rest because I use Vista for everything else.

So it depends on how much you want to do for each OS.
#22
I have both, and I barely use vista. its just so slow and annoying. The one thing about ubuntu. Dont use it if you dont have a good knowledge of pcs. And this is general knowledge, not Windows knowledge. I cant see most people I know understanding running programs as root, and how you dont have tidy exe installers. Actually the linux system of installers is even tidyer than that but I wont get into it. Also prepare to make friends with the terminal(similar to the command prompt). I have mine on a shortcut key so I can pull it up in a second. You'll be using this alot. I'm not trying to scare you away from it. If you stick with ubuntu and linux in general i think you'll find it a faster, more satisfying way of working.
#23
Quote by sam_S92
How much of an effect would dual-booting have on the speed of the computer? Would it be smart to partition the hard drive into halves? like 80GB for Vista and 80GB for Ubuntu?

Doesn't change anything, I have only 10GB for Fedora (since it's only for me to mess with it) and it's fine.
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#24
Quote by Def
I have both, and I barely use vista. its just so slow and annoying. The one thing about ubuntu. Dont use it if you dont have a good knowledge of pcs. And this is general knowledge, not Windows knowledge. I cant see most people I know understanding running programs as root, and how you dont have tidy exe installers. Actually the linux system of installers is even tidyer than that but I wont get into it. Also prepare to make friends with the terminal(similar to the command prompt). I have mine on a shortcut key so I can pull it up in a second. You'll be using this alot. I'm not trying to scare you away from it. If you stick with ubuntu and linux in general i think you'll find it a faster, more satisfying way of working.

While that may be generally true, it will be horrible for a music oriented computer.
#25
Quote by poopt
While that may be generally true, it will be horrible for a music oriented computer.


true. setting up midi on linux is painful. I did it though. Had to set up my own sampler, and mixer and stuff though. And mod my kernel to get the clock ticks per second up
#26
Thanks for all the advice guys, I'll be sure to try out both of the OS's and see which one is right for me.
#27
Quote by Def
true. setting up midi on linux is painful. I did it though. Had to set up my own sampler, and mixer and stuff though. And mod my kernel to get the clock ticks per second up

Yea, too much hassle.