#1
Ok so I searched the forums and I got lots of stuff......but lots of it is all different. How does it all tie-up? Say my root note is A (5th fret, 6th string) and I go up 3 notes on the scale, that would be the third of that root note?

ok now WHAT SCALE DO I USE!!?!?!?!??

Is it all the same or what! Thats where im gettign confused!

Please help
#3
No harmonizing in thirds is playing whatever riff you have a major third interval up the neck Which if i'm correct its four frets away. You don't use specific scales when harmonizing because it tends to go out of key most of the time anyway. Harmonizing is taking say, a riff and playing it a different interval. Some intervals are more pleasing than others. The ones that sound good are consonant and the bad ones are dissonant. The best ones are majors thirds, perfect fourths, and perfect fifths. There are others but I'm lazy. The worst ones i can think of are diminished fifths and major sevenths
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Last edited by Nemesis260 at Aug 5, 2007,
#4
that my question too...i was gonna start a thread about it...but...yu did it 1st...

im really confused bout it too...so im just gonna sit back and watch wat ppl have to say
#5
Well, A third is minor, correct? (I think so, my memories a little foggy on this) So any minor scale would work (IE: Dorian, Phrygian, Aeolian, etc). I think the best one to use would be Phrygian. But the Third of A is c#, so I think you could also play C# major.

I'm no fully sure.
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#6
If the a you are playing is supposed to be major then you would use the a major scale which is a b c# d e f# g# a, the third of that being c#, which is four frets up on the a string, if the a is supposed to imply a minor chord then use the scale a b c d e f g a, and the third is c, which is three frets up from the a, for the blues scale you can use either
#7
take whatever key you are in, and go 3 notes from whatever note you play. lets say you are playing in A minor. the riff is:


D
A--------5
E-5-7-8------8-7-5


the harmony would be


D
A----------8
E-8-10-12----12-10-8


you see how on the "5" i just went 3 notes up to "8" and that was the harmony?
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#8
Let's say you are in the Key of A major and want to harmonize in diatonic thirds.

Let's say the line you want to harmonize is: A C# G#.

Now, the A major scale is A B C# D E F# G#. To harmonize in thirds, you would take the note you want to harmonize and play the note that is a third away from it in the scale. Basically you are "leap frogging" So the A would be played with a C#, the C# would be played with an E, and the G# would be played with a B.

That was harmonizing in diatonic thirds, that is, thirds within the scale. You can also harmonize in parallel major or minor thirds. Basically, that means that each note is harmonized with the note that is a major or minor third from it (depending on which you choose).

Let's harmonize our line in parallel major thirds. A C# G# is our line. Now, over that, you play a note that is a major third above each note in the line. So the line over that is C# E# B#.

Harmonized with parallel minor thirds: C E B.


EDIT: Wow, people posted fast lol.
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Aug 5, 2007,
#9
It depends what kind of thirds (the quality - minor or major) you're harmonizing in. The most common way to do it is in diatonic thirds - thirds that are diatonic to a specific scale.

If you were harmonizing in thirds using the A major scale, the thirds available to you would be:

A - C# = Major third.
B - D = Minor third.
C# - E = Minor third.
D - F# = Major third.
E - G# = Major third.
F# - A = Minor third.
G# - B = Minor third.

So, if your melody went A - E - G# - A, harmonizing this in thirds that are diatonic to the A major scale would give you C# - G# - B - C#. The idea here is to harmonize using a third interval that appears within the key you're playing in.

You don't have to harmonize completely diatonic to a specific key, you can harmonize in strict minor thirds, major thirds or any specific major/minor third pattern that took your fancy.. for a complete list of all notes and their minor thirds and major thirds for future reference.. see this thread: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=643207

#10
I found a really simple way to do harmonies. Play your first lick, then find what scale shape it is from. Move every note up 3 scale intervals and you have your harmony.

The tab isn't the best but bear with me

For example, say I have this riff:

E :---------------------|
B :---------------------|
G :---------------------|
D :---------------------|
A :10-9---------------|
E :-----12-10---------|

Pretty simple right? So this is the scale shape it is from:


E :--------------------------|-----------------10-12--|
B :--------------------------|--------10-12-13-------|
G :--------------------------|9-10-12----------------|
D :--------------9-10-12--|--------------------------|
A :------9-10-12----------|---------------------------|
E :10-12-------------------|--------------------------|

It's E minor or G major with the scale extending up and down a few notes.

So now you just move each note from the riff up 3 intervals and you get:

E :-----------------|
B :-----------------|
G :-----------------|
D :9-7--------------|
A :----10-9---------|
E :-----------------|

See? Easy. Let me know if you have questions
#11
Quote by Johnljones7443
It depends what kind of thirds (the quality - minor or major) you're harmonizing in. The most common way to do it is in diatonic thirds - thirds that are diatonic to a specific scale.

If you were harmonizing in thirds using the A major scale, the thirds available to you would be:

A - C# = Major third.
B - D = Minor third.
C# - E = Minor third.
D - F# = Major third.
E - G# = Major third.
F# - A = Minor third.
G# - B = Minor third.

So, if your melody went A - E - G# - A, harmonizing this in thirds that are diatonic to the A major scale would give you C# - G# - B - C#. The idea here is to harmonize using a third interval that appears within the key you're playing in.

You don't have to harmonize completely diatonic to a specific key, you can harmonize in strict minor thirds, major thirds or any specific major/minor third pattern that took your fancy.. for a complete list of all notes and their minor thirds and major thirds for future reference.. see this thread: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=643207




WOOOO!!! Should be on a sticky. That chart will be very useful for me. THank you
#12
You start with the root note. Three notes above IN THAT SAME SCALE is a third. So if the root was A, and the scale was A, you would go up in three notes in the A scale, and if the note was C but still in A you would go up 3 notes.


If that made sense.
#13
You can harmonize depending on w/e chord is under it. Or you can harmonize depending on key, or not follow key and fool around. But general rule is major/minor thirds, 6ths. Avoid moving completely in 5ths and 4ths. Try doing all 3rds, then try all of the others, then try mixing them up....
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#14
When you harmonize in thirds -- this rule applies almost exclusively to thirds, sixths and sevenths -- you don't harmonise in ALL major thirds or ALL minor thirds, for that would sound like crap. You harmonize in diatonic thirds, which will be either major or minor depending on the root note and the key you're in.

For future reference...
Minor third - A tone + a semitone, three frets difference (example: A to C, open fifth string to third fret fifth string)
Major third - Two tones, four frets difference (example: C to E, third fret fifth string to seventh fret fifth string)

Let's assume you're playing in the scale of A minor. The notes in A minor are as follows:
A B C D E F G

Now, there are many ways to make thirds. We'll examine one of the easiest methods. The most important rule to remember, when harmonizing in diatonic thirds, is that every note will be in the same key -- you will have no accidentals/out-of-key notes.

Let's start with the root note -- A. To find the diatonic third in the key of A minor, you look at the notes in the key of A minor, and go two notes up from that - C. Now, if you examine the distance from A to C, that's three frets - a minor third.
The second note is a B; much like you did with A, go two notes to the right of B, keeping in mind that you are still looking at the key of A minor. B to D, that makes a minor third.
Continuing with that pattern, you should get C to E (a major third), D to F (a minor third), E to G (a minor third), F to A (a major third), and G to B (a major third).

The pattern for diatonic thirds for all minor scales is the same, and it is as follows:
1 - Minor
2 - Minor*
3 - Major
4 - Minor
5 - Minor
6 - Major
7 - Major


Every scale has a consistant pattern for thirds (as it does for triads, four-tone chords, five-tone chords, etc) that can be derived using the method above.

Note that harmonizing thirds is probably the single most common form of harmony in musical theory and can sound great with a little experimentation.

EDIT: Also, harmonizing in fifths is better known as powerchords, and harmonizing in fourths is extremely common in jazz.
#15
Quote by OrganGrinder


E :---------------------|
B :---------------------|
G :---------------------|
D :---------------------|
A :10-9---------------|
E :-----12-10---------|

wooooah i played that a couple times fast and it sounded like "you like me too much" by the Beatles, anybody else think so?

Pretty simple right? So this is the scale shape it is from:


E :--------------------------|-----------------10-12--|
B :--------------------------|--------10-12-13-------|
G :--------------------------|9-10-12----------------|
D :--------------9-10-12--|--------------------------|
A :------9-10-12----------|---------------------------|
E :10-12-------------------|--------------------------|

It's E minor or G major with the scale extending up and down a few notes.

umm...no it isn't


i dont even think that is a scale


My mind is going. I can feel it.
#16
Quote by MTVget0FFtheAIR
i dont even think that is a scale

It is a G major scale. The only thing is that there is an F on the G string instead of an F#.
#17
i havent learnt this stuff yet, but i have read through this post.

can i ask a question? -
is it simply moving a given riff up the fretboard by a third??
so you will just transpose the shape??

i cant believe its that simple!!!! but from what ive read, thats what seems to be happening can somebody explain why?

example
--------------------........................----------------------------
--------------------........................----------------------------
-----------------3-....would be......-------------6--------------- a minor third up???
-----------6-------........................-----------9-----------------
--------5----------........................--------8--------------------
--3--4------------........................-6--7-------------------------
Last edited by branny1982 at Aug 6, 2007,
#18
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
It is a G major scale. The only thing is that there is an F on the G string instead of an F#.

That would make it a G Moxilydian.

And, it's NOT that simple. If you simply harmonize by moving everything up a minor third it will sound like CRAP and half of your notes will be in the wrong key. That would be harmonizing using the diminished scale which I'm 99% sure is not what you want.

Listen to ATWA by System of a Down to hear what harmonizing by thirds sounds like.
Last edited by Me2NiK at Aug 6, 2007,
#19
Quote by Me2NiK
That would make it a G Moxilydian.

And, it's NOT that simple. If you simply harmonize by moving everything up a minor third it will sound like CRAP and half of your notes will be in the wrong key. That would be harmonizing using the diminished scale which I'm 99% sure is not what you want.

Listen to ATWA by System of a Down to hear what harmonizing by thirds sounds like.

Well, there's an F# in the first octave and in the second octave there is an F, so I guess you could say the first octave is G major and the next is G Mixolydian. I'm pretty sure that OrganGrinder just made a typo anyway lol