#1
I was wondering how you could apply modes to chord progressions (not soloing). Like, I understand that ionian is good for major chords, dorian is good for minor 7ths and 9ths, but what about full chord progressions? I'll use the C major scale for example: I- IV- V, which is C- F- G. Is it possible to tranpose this to another mode? The whole modal thing has been really confusing for me, any help would be appreciated. And if you can, can you give me a few modal chord progressions in the key of C, just for reference?
And another thing, what's the difference between modes and scale intervals? And how could you use them?
Sorry if this is confusing and/or doesnt make sense, but i assure you, it's much more confusing to me than it is to you
Any answers, examples, etc. is greatly appreciated. Thanks
#2
1-Ionian
2-Dorian
3-Phrygian
4-Lydian
5-Mixolydian
6-Aeolian
7-Locrian

These are the modes that go to the scale numbers. There are others that are altered and used over altered chords. Don't just use Ionian over any major chord. For example when playing in C Maj and u play over an F Maj chord if you use the Ionian scale instead of Lydian the 4th degree will be flat.
#3
^^ I kind of get that.. C ionian = C-D-E-F-G-A-B, and so the lydian mode for the C major scale would be the F lydian, correct? That's all I got.. and I really don't understand this whole 'which scale/mode to use when playing over a chord' thing. I mean, if you're gonna be using the lydian over F maj, what'll happen when the chord changes? Does that mean you have to switch modes every time the chord changes? And i'm sorry, I don't quite understand what you said, my head hurts from trying to process it (about the flattening of the 4th degree I mean). The notes in F maj. chord are F, A and C. And since all those notes are in the C ionian scale, why would you need to flatten the 4th degree??
#4
^yes thats how I use modes. Everyones probably got their own ideas though. I change modes when the rhythm changes chords.
And the lydian mode, without any alterations, always has a raised fourth, always.
#5
There are modal chord progressions. For example, this progression would call for an F Lydian scale: | F | G | Am C | F |.
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#6
One thing you should with the chords is to pick chords that have the defining characteristics of the mode you are using.
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
^yes thats how I use modes. Everyones probably got their own ideas though. I change modes when the rhythm changes chords.
And the lydian mode, without any alterations, always has a raised fourth, always.

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