#1
I admit to having no ear for music, but my technical level is getting pretty good and my theory knowledge is pretty strong. When you're writing for lead guitar, when is the point where boxes and scales actually help? Does one note really follow another note better than some other random note? I've been seeing an increasing amount of guitarists who learn scales and then just throw them away and play what sounds good. If that's the case, why did I learn all that theory? How can I use a scale to improve writing lead, as opposed to just finding what sounds right?

One more question- are there any ways to figure out what note naturally plays off of the previous note by using a system? Like, it makes little sense to me to follow F with Gb in the next fret because the notes don't progress quickly enough, but are some notes "better" than others in the context of the music?
Last edited by eminentgonz at Aug 7, 2007,
#2
I've been watching this earlier, and it seems like it could be useful to you:

http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=5777562536751428345&q=marty+friedman+melodic+control&total=11&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=0

How to write lead guitar eh? My tip is just to fiddle around with the scale. That way you'll learn to find licks and runs that sound good to YOUR ear, instead of learning someone elses licks.
#3
Quote by Jehuty
I've been watching this earlier, and it seems like it could be useful to you:

http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=5777562536751428345&q=marty+friedman+melodic+control&total=11&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=0

How to write lead guitar eh? My tip is just to fiddle around with the scale. That way you'll learn to find licks and runs that sound good to YOUR ear, instead of learning someone elses licks.


That guy is ridiculously talented. I'm watching it now.
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#4
lmao, yeah, THAT is the video you want for playing lead. marty friedman is tha shizzle.
#5
In all fairness, what I'm about to type may come off as slightly queer...Your best bet, in terms of playing lead guitar, is probably NOT to write your solos. I have found that improvising tends to lend itself to playing lead guitar. Solos that are written will always sound like just that, written. Improvised solos will contain many peaks and valleys that a written solo just will not have. Your emotions will flow into your lead lines as your mood sways throughout the course of your solo. As for the use of scales, I believe that everyone should be versed in music theory (every musician that is). Use scales as a guide, but do not use them as a rule. Scales are just a device to allow you to convey your melodies in the proper key, however, never be afraid to break out of that box! Solos always come off better when the guitarist playing them improvises following his emotions, and never gets stuck in that damn box.
#6
Quote by CobAtr
In all fairness, what I'm about to type may come off as slightly queer...Your best bet, in terms of playing lead guitar, is probably NOT to write your solos. I have found that improvising tends to lend itself to playing lead guitar. Solos that are written will always sound like just that, written. Improvised solos will contain many peaks and valleys that a written solo just will not have. Your emotions will flow into your lead lines as your mood sways throughout the course of your solo. As for the use of scales, I believe that everyone should be versed in music theory (every musician that is). Use scales as a guide, but do not use them as a rule. Scales are just a device to allow you to convey your melodies in the proper key, however, never be afraid to break out of that box! Solos always come off better when the guitarist playing them improvises following his emotions, and never gets stuck in that damn box.


qft. Yeh i agree with what he said but in reference to playing with/without scales maybe you don't notice at the time but as soon as you start playing and improvising with in the scales you'll notice that if you just play random notes it will often sound awful when you hit one that you shouldn't. (Sometimes can work well however) I'm sure you can learn this by ear, but it'll take a lot more effort and a lot of listening, and as you say your ear is not that good i'd recommend you learn scales.

Edit: Cheers for the video awesome.
Last edited by JimmyStradlin33 at Aug 8, 2007,
#7
Quote by eminentgonz
I admit to having no ear for music, but my technical level is getting pretty good and my theory knowledge is pretty strong. When you're writing for lead guitar, when is the point where boxes and scales actually help? Does one note really follow another note better than some other random note? I've been seeing an increasing amount of guitarists who learn scales and then just throw them away and play what sounds good. If that's the case, why did I learn all that theory? How can I use a scale to improve writing lead, as opposed to just finding what sounds right?

I personally go with what sounds good to me, because I'm the person I'm trying to please, noone else. For me, it's not about what someone else thinks. So when I play a solo, I go with what I think sounds best.

Quote by eminentgonz
One more question- are there any ways to figure out what note naturally plays off of the previous note by using a system? Like, it makes little sense to me to follow F with Gb in the next fret because the notes don't progress quickly enough, but are some notes "better" than others in the context of the music?

Maybe you should try chord tones? From F, you could go to A. That could be considered to be the 1 and 3 of the F chord, or the 3 and 5 of a Dm chord. Try using chord tones in your solos, and see if that helps you.

Find out what music is pleasing to your ear when someone solos. And just for my curiosity, how long have you been playing for?
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#8
Quote by Page&HammettFan
I personally go with what sounds good to me, because I'm the person I'm trying to please, noone else. For me, it's not about what someone else thinks. So when I play a solo, I go with what I think sounds best.


Maybe you should try chord tones? From F, you could go to A. That could be considered to be the 1 and 3 of the F chord, or the 3 and 5 of a Dm chord. Try using chord tones in your solos, and see if that helps you.

Find out what music is pleasing to your ear when someone solos. And just for my curiosity, how long have you been playing for?


About seven months seriously; about a year in total.