#1
On average? I have the problem of not being able to concentrate on one song and not start playing something else completely different. After playing for 6 yrs Ive just realised that I can actually only play a handful of songs all the way through.
#2
I have the same problem, but it's more important to be able to write own songs and improvise than knowing how to play other people's songs note to note anyway.
#3
^Not if you need ideas, inspiration, etc. I get where your coming from but if you can copy an artist's style than you'll be pretty well rounded and be able to refine your own sound even better imo. Anyway, it depends, I've learned a song in about 15 to 30 minutes to 6 months (Tornado of Souls, f---ing hard when it comes time to solo but that's because I started learning it at about 1 year and because I put it on hold for awhile). Just stick with it and make sure you pick songs that you really want to learn at first. Once you can start picking up songs quickly then you'll start to learn them faster.
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#4
It does really depend on the song. Usually it takes me a few hours to get a song memorized and another few if its a difficult solo. But it takes many days of practicing to get it down perfect.
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#5
For me it takes only a few minutes for the rhythm but memorizing hard solos take me about an hour or two.
#6
depends entirely on how hard the song is. general modern rock and pop tunes are stock scales and chords and i can usually ear them out after listening once or twice and go in and play'em. jazz, classical, some blues and some metal take a little while (but even the blues and metal i can usually ear out after 3 or 4 listens) i disagree with strat wizard. i think initially it's important to be able to play other artists songs because learning how the people you admire wrote their music will affect how yours is written as well. it can also give you ideas you may have never considered, especially when you learn songs by people you don't generally listen to (i have a guilty pleasure for madonna as an example) but also i do believe being able to write a well thought out cohesive song is quite important as well (especially if you want to start writing your own material) and learning how others wrote their songs can give you a good overview and general idea of how to go about doing this. i still learn songs all the time (well i ear them out generally,but its still learning)
#7
Ya, I learned crazy train in one hour except the solo. The solo was a little tricky just memorizing.
#8
I Like To Perfect The Songs ^^
Tends To Take About A Week
Well
I Learn A Song In About
Half Hour
Then Spend Like A Week Trying To Make It Perfect
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#9
Quote by dough boy
On average? I have the problem of not being able to concentrate on one song and not start playing something else completely different. After playing for 6 yrs Ive just realised that I can actually only play a handful of songs all the way through.


I was the same way, but this year I told myself I will stick with a song until I have learned all of the parts, rhythm, lead, etc. perfectly all the way through. And I am talking about difficult songs with multiple parts and hard solos - not songs with just a simple chord progression for rhythm and that's it.

I only practice 3 or 4 songs at a time right now, instead of what I used to do, which was hop around from riff to riff.

This has forced me to sit down and focus on some difficult solos that would have previously made me give up on the song and start on another riff that I could learn more quickly, sort of an instant gratification thing. I feel like I'm improving at a much faster rate as a result.

Out of the 5-6 songs that I'm trying to learn all the way through, I still don't know any of them well enough all the way through to record and post on dmusic or anything. There's usually a really tough passage that I can't quite play at normal speed. I'm close on a few songs, I'd like to have them finished and recorded this year.
#10
Also - I don't know how you guys can 'learn a hard solo in an hour or two'.

Are you telling me you can listen to something like a Randy Rhoades or Yngwie solo and play it back after a couple of listens? Either you are god at guitar or you are lying.
#11
I have the same problem, but it's more important to be able to write own songs and improvise than knowing how to play other people's songs note to note anyway.


The jazz musician in me wants to agree with stratwizard.

The wanna-be classical musician in me wants to disagree.

As far as I see it, you should acquire a repertoire by memorizing some tunes here and there, but, in less that specific genre of music calls for a perfect note for note performance (ala classical) than refrain from doing so, and rather treat the music as a framework for your own improvisation. All that aside, you should never overlook the importance of sight-reading, as it makes you a much more valuable performer, and you don't have to memorize every single piece you happen to enjoy. That "pick-up and play" ability is invaluable.
#12
When I first started it would take me hours and hours...now I can learn a song in a couple of plays generally. If its a hard song it'll take about 10 plays overall and i get it. I am quite determined..if i can't do one bit of a song ill rewind to the part and just play it over and over until i get it.
#13
^ try moonlight sonata in its entirety. i promise FAR more than 10 plays will be required to get the whole thing down unless yer some kind of savant.
#14
Yes no doubt. I'm talking generally though on the songs i've learnt recently. I'm no amazing bassist...but the better you get, the quicker you learn things.
#15
Quote by z4twenny
^ try moonlight sonata in its entirety. i promise FAR more than 10 plays will be required to get the whole thing down unless yer some kind of savant.


Especially the second and third movements. The third movement seems literally impossible on guitar.

It depends on the genre for me. Classical pieces usually take me a while, and same with jazz, but since most rock music follows a certain format, I can often listen to a rock song and play it back on guitar without having to "learn" it, per se, especially if it's clear what key the song's in.
#16
there a some songs where I've spent hours just learning to play one bar of it up to speed (fancy solos and stuff)

and there are songs where I can play on the first try (though these are the ones I usually forget soon after :P)

Quote by Chaingarden
Especially the second and third movements. The third movement seems literally impossible on guitar.


the 2nd part wouldn't be impossible

you'd have to be some kind of wizard to play the 3rd movement


I once learnt most of one arrangement of the first part in an evening...though I've since forgotten it
#17
This is a great topic. For me certain songs come easily, while others get we wanting to hurl my axe across the room in rage! Clapton's Laya (electric version) took about an hour because the solos are pretty much all the same scale, while Avenged Seven Fold's Bat Country is kicking my ass, mostly do to the speed of one part. This is frustrating but also a great tool to let me know where I suck. Most Breaking Benjamin songs take 15-30 minutes.
The trick is to learning the solgs all the way through otherwise you don't learn anything.
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#18
It takes me hardly anytime to "learn" a song. Probably less than an hour including solos if there is one. Playing it at the correct tempo is another thing. Songs that have complex solo's have taken me up to two months to play properly and cleanly.

My advice is to join a band. You'll play/learn more complete songs.
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#19
the 3rd part isn't impossible (not that i can play it, maybe i can pull it off once before i die) i've seen it tabbed out in GP and it looks more than insane but i think given enough time and practice someone, somewhere could play it. perhaps the guitar messiah.....
#20
There's some people playing Moonlight Sonata on youtube - but I think they're only playing the 1st movement. Some of Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin are pretty crazy on guitar.
#21
You've just gotta decide that you're learning that song, and play that song until you've got it down. I'll very often just say "**** this!" and go do something else, though, when I've decided that I don't feel like figuring certain songs out before.
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#22
well it just depends on you and if you feel like you dont want to add all of the fancy stuff that a lot of songs have. it really depends on why your learning the song if ur using it in a band then u might not like a certian partr of it but if your your learning for yourself then do whatever. but i try and get the drift of a lot of songs and then i can pretty much play them all the way through
#23
Quote by pos69sum
There's some people playing Moonlight Sonata on youtube - but I think they're only playing the 1st movement. Some of Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin are pretty crazy on guitar.

the 3rd movement of the Moonlight Sonata is just insane
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqSulR9Fymg

might be slightly easier to do as a duet rather than a solo arrangement
Last edited by seljer at Aug 9, 2007,