#1
So I'm (hopefully) go to begin writing my own songs soon.

I've been asked to join a band (which is actually going to be my second band, but the first only plays covers at this point), and I'd like to begin to contribute through writing my own music.

Based upon songs I've learned, I can see that the verses of some songs don't necessarily follow a "set" chord progression.

So what I'm asking is what are these chords based upon? I'm assuming that it is in relation perhaps to the pitch (and thus note) of the voice, but I'm not sure.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks.
#2
its based on vocal notes, bass line, riffs, and key sigs
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#3
It would seem to me, though I'm obviously no expert on the subject (hence the reason for his thread), that vocal notes (as well as key signature, though that is a bit obvious) would play the biggest part (this, of course, is making the assumption that the lines aren't sung over a riff or bass line).
#4
If you write the melody before the progression, it will be only as restrained as your 'inner ear' is. So, you write your melody, then try and find the harmony (chords) to fit to it, which could be very outside sounding depending on the melody.
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#6
Quote by TheHeartbreaker
Based upon songs I've learned, I can see that the verses of some songs don't necessarily follow a "set" chord progression.

So what I'm asking is what are these chords based upon? I'm assuming that it is in relation perhaps to the pitch (and thus note) of the voice, but I'm not sure.


Could you list a few examples of what you meant by not following a set chord progression? I'm a bit confused on that point.


But, as nightwind said, if you have the melody, you have a lot of harmonic options, depending on how consonant or dissonant you want things to sound. Your mind probably will have a few ideas of what a good harmony would be, so you should work towards finding out what those options are, but a little experimentation could yield interesting results as well.
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#7
Here's an example: Box of Rain by the Grateful Dead (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/g/grateful_dead/box_of_rain_crd.htm).

The chord progression in the verse is, based upon first glance D, Am, Em, C, but then you see that afterwards G starts to appear, and then the chords aren't consistently in the order that they started in.