#1
So I was just fooling around on guitar and I was thinking of how cool descending chromatic basslines sounds over a melody, and then this sort of spat out.

|-14--------14-16--------16-|-14--------14--------------|
|---------------------------|--------------17--------17-|
|---------------------------|---------------------------|
|---------------------------|---------------------------|
|---------------------------|---------------------------|
|---------------------------|---------------------------|
|
|  H            H              H            H
|---------------------------|---------------------------|
|--7------------9-----------|--7------------5-----------|
|--8------------8-----------|--8------------6-----------|
|--9------------8-----------|--7------------6-----------|
|---------------------------|---------------------------|
|---------------------------|---------------------------|

|--------------------------|--------------------------*|
|-16--------16-14-------14-|--------------------------*|
|--------------------------|-16--------16-16----------*|
|--------------------------|--------------------------*|
|--------------------------|--------------------------*|
|--------------------------|--------------------------*|
|
|  H            H             H            H
|--------------------------|---------------2----------*|
|--4------------2----------|--5------------4----------*|
|--4------------3----------|--4------------4----------*|
|--2------------4----------|--7-----------------------*|
|--------------------------|--------------------------*|
|--------------------------|--------------------------*|


That's it, short and simple little ditty. But I don't really know how to analyze the chords for it, since I unusally didn't really think when writing it. Should I just put a slash to indicate the bass or would it be counted as an alteration to the chord because of the descending bass, or what? Really over the first two measures qualifiy, so I know the other ones

(I guess you can see it here: http://www.divshare.com/download/1593172-705, but it doesn't really matter)
#2
The first two bars go

B major, A#min7sus4(no 5th), D#dim, C#minor.

The A#min7sus4 is replacing the vii min7b5 chord in B major.


I would look at that progression as moving through two key centres, going:

In B major: I major - vii min7b5, then in C#minor ii dim - i minor.


For writing down the chromatic descending bass line, you could say which inversion each chord is in (eg the C# minor is second inversion so you could write a "c" after the numeral). I think it would be easier to just use standard notation.


I'd wait for one of the theory gurus to back me up or correct me before you take this as gospel
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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Last edited by marmoseti at Aug 15, 2007,
#3
first chord: B D# F#
B major, pretty obvious

second chord: A# D# F#, but turn it around and you have D# F# A#, which would be a D# minor triad. So D#m, second inversion

third chord: A D# F#, again, turn it around and you have D# F# A, which this time is a diminished triad
D#°, again, second inversion. As the last chord was also D# it seems that you have modulated into a different key or scale here.

fourth chord: G# C# E
2nd inversion yet again, C# E G#, C#m

fifth chord: E B D#
just roughly guessing from the song, I'm going to say that this could be Emaj7, even if its missing the G#

sixth chord: F# A# C#
a simple F#

seventh chord: A B E
Asus2
sounds good because the B is borrowed from the following chord, which gives a feel of resolution

eighth chord: B D# F#
B major, right where we started


so altogether
B -> D#m/A# -> D#°/A -> C#m/G# -> Emaj7 ->F# -> Asus2 -> B
I'd write down what the bass note is in the names, because if you want to have that descending chromatic bit stand out you have to specify what the voicings of the chords are

it starts out in B major, and I'm not really an expert in that stuff, but when it gets to that diminished chord, it goes into B mixolydian and stays in it up to the end


edit: whoops, slightly confused about that modulating part and the second half, as E and F# would imply B ionian, but with that A there it mixolydian
Last edited by seljer at Aug 15, 2007,
#4
Quote by seljer


second chord: A# D# F# , but turn it around and you have D# F# A#, which would be a D# minor triad.


The second chord is A# D# G#, so it's not an inversion of D# minor. It could be D# minor sus4 though.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#5
he has A# D# F# in the powertab file, which was from where I was working when writing that post
#6
It sounds better with the F#, so I think the powertab is right. In that case I'd change my analysis to:

The first two bars go

B major, D#minor, D#dim, C#minor.


I would look at that progression as moving through two key centres, going:

In B major: I major - iii minor, then in C#minor ii dim - i minor.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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PM Marmoseti or Confusius to join