#1
If my capo is on the 3rd fret and i'm playing the chords G, D, Em, and C. If someone wanted to strum along without a capo, what would they play?

I'd really like to know how to figure this out. Any help is appreciated. I would just assume but you what that does.
#2
would you nto just move the note down 3 semi tones, eg g 3 semi tones down or something like that i don't really know though but worth a try
#4
If you're thinking about it this way:

Following chord is relative to the capo

0
0
1 (relative to capo on 3rd Fret)
2
2
0

This is the same shape as an E in open position but the actual chord would be

3
3
4 (actual chord numbering relative to the nut)
5
5
3

This is actually just a G Major bar chord so you're buddy could just play a stand G Major chord which is (in the standard open position/no capo)

3
3
0 (equivalent chord for guitar in standard position/no capo)
0
2
3


All you really need to know is what the root note is on guitar with the capo and then just play that chord (well and if it's a major/minor chord etc).

If you look at each number as being a fret on the 6th (low E) string the notes are:

0-E
1-F
2-F#/Gb
3-G
4-G#/Ab
5-A
6-A#/Bb
7-B
8-C
9-C#/Db
10-D
11-D#/Eb
12-E

The lowest note in any chord is usually the root note and therefore characterizes the name of the chord (say you have a chord that uses the 6th string, 7th fret as it's lowest note. Assuming that it's a Major chord then it would be called a B. If you want to but that in standard position you play a B starting at the 2nd fret on the 5th string).
Last edited by mattvl at Aug 16, 2007,
#7
0-E
1-F
2-F#/Gb
3-G
4-G#/Ab
5-A
6-A#/Bb
7-B
8-C
9-C#/Db
10-D
11-D#/Eb
12-E


Can you do this in relation to minor chords?
#8
^please, start a new thread for that.
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#9
same answer i just posted on the g and d scale forum:

search "CAGED" system, probably a lesson on this site. that is the scale patterns for C, A, G, E, and D (hence the acronym-name). for any given key, the scales come in that order down the neck. for instance, playing in the key of C, use the C scale at frets 1 through 4, scale of A at frets 3 through 7, G scale at frets 5 through 9, and so on. not playing in the key of C? no problem, the pattern just starts over. in key of G, next comes E at third fret, D at fifth fret, etc...

invest in one of those slides at a music store, its a $10 piece of cardboard that's been worth more to me than all of my guitars except my first.
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