#1
So... as some of you might know, Im building a delay pedal
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=648440

Now im finished, but.
It dont work!

Its really noisy when bypassed, and a bit noisy when its on.
Im gonna change input/output wires to shielded wires.

Thats not the big problem. Its supposed to make an echo, but it just work
as a treble booster. Now, Im not what good at delay circuits so am asking
you guys for help.

here is the schematic: http://www.tonepad.com/getFile.asp?id=98

And here are some pictures:




As you can see, I do the grounding on the back of the pots. (no grounding trace on tonepads pcb layouts)

The current pcb is made of some german piece of sh*t.. (kemo)
Do you think I should make an entire new pcb?
"I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin"
// Angus Young

+1
#2


The brownish color in the red area is melted flux I believe... I re-soldered the pots to get more neatness.
"I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin"
// Angus Young

+1
#3
It also seems as though you have a few points on the PCB soldered together that shouldn't be. I'd say that you ought to get a new PCB and practice soldering more so your joints are smaller and cleaner.
In the Oven:

18 Watt!
#4
Ehm, i guarantee you that no solder points that shouldnt be soldered together are soldered together. Cleaner, yea.. not my best solder job exactly, but im tellin' ya, those joints are pretty d*mn clean (sitting and watching them right now under magnification) And
you need a radiation suit too survive the light beams from the lamp. (not literally).
You cant see that on a picture, duh

Ok... im gonna make a new pcb of that german stuff...
"I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin"
// Angus Young

+1
#5
Why the excessive ground wires on the pots? I think that's not going to be helping your grounding issues. Pots don't need to be grounded.
Anyway, check the orientation of your IC's, especially the PT299. Check it's getting voltage where it should be getting voltage. Also check all other points that are connected to +9v are getting the same voltage as your battery is reading.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."
#6
Quote by the_random_hero
Why the excessive ground wires on the pots?


No, you see... not excessive. Take a look at http://www.tonepad.com/getFile.asp?id=76

Notice the "This connection can be made thru metal chassis"
So, instead of having a wire as ground, I choosed to ground the pots (because one: I use plastic jacks, none of them having any connection with the enclosure and two: couldn´t get the solder to stick on the onclosure.)

I've checked the voltages, 9 volt respectively 4.5 volt to supply the TL072CP.
9 volt at the 78L05's intput leg then 5 volt at the outputleg.

But now, I've soldered the out from the pots n' stuff in the enclosure. Ready start over...
"I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin"
// Angus Young

+1
#7
The pots will already be grounded to the enclosure. Wire all your grounds to a ground trace running along the board and it will already be grounded to the enclosure through the pots casing. The way you've done it now will create ground loops.
What that diagram is similar to how Boss pedals are rigged up - metal jacks that aren't insulated for the ground wire to the output jack.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."
#8
What you've done isn't entirely wrong, its not uncommon to make a ground point on the back of a pots metal casing. I can't tell from the photos but make sure that all your ground points are connected at least, or move them all to the same place. Different ground points could be what's giving you all the extra noise you don't want.
Bring back Tabo
#9
Yea... I've use the back of the pots as ground, then I connected them with eachother. Which in my opinion is one common ground (tell me if im wrong)

the_random_hero
Then I have to modify the board... lol on me (make part of the trace bigger and drill some holes

This is basicly the grounding that I've done:


Shouldn't that work?
"I never liked those Deep Purples or those sort of things. I always hated it. I always thought it was a poor man’s Led Zeppelin"
// Angus Young

+1
#10
It will work, but I still think it's contributing to your hum problems. Get rid of the wires connecting the pots and connect the wire from the DC jack and input/output jacks to a common point (preferably on the board, but it can also be on one of the jacks).
I'm almost 100% sure this will get rid of some of your hum.
After this, try the shielded input and output wires. Connect the shields up to the same grounding point as the rest of the wires.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."