#1
Ok So here is the story I have a squier p-bass and it broke on me. (shocker)

So I am looking for a better bass and need some opinions if you dont mind.

I really dont want to spend more than $350, cuz I still have to buy an amp I am only working part time so please dont recomend some $500 bass cuz I dont have that kind of money.

I am looking at these

epiphone thunderbird IV

Schecter Omen-4 4-String Bass Guitar

Ibanez SR305DX Soundgear 5-String Electric Bass Guitar

First off which is the most reliable?

and which will be best for playing Rock music?


Any help would be nice

Thanks


heres the links for each guitar

http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_ibanez_sr305dx_soundgear_5string_electric_bass?full_sku=519580%2e219


http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_epiphone_thunderbird_iv_bass?full_sku=100388504


http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_schecter_omen4_4string_bass_guitar?full_sku=513122%2e178%2e829
#2
Real men play 4 strings.
Yamaha 503TVL
Yamaha Pacifica
Squier Tele Custom II
Crafter bass
Cube 60
Kustom 2x12
#3
the Schecter, or the Ibanez. also check out the Squier modified series. a used Fender
Jazz mim is also worth looking into.
Last edited by 83lespaulstudio at Aug 18, 2007,
#4
Agreed on Squier VM, used Fender or Schecter. I find any Ibanez below an SR500 to be a little lacking in the "good" department, and Epiphone Thunderbirds are just shit, well documented, very apparent, unavoidable steaming piles of guano. No two ways about it.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
Last edited by Caustic at Aug 18, 2007,
#5
For sure not the Epiphone. I have a Schecter and an Ibanez, and I prefer my Schecter, which makes sense, considering its twice the price :P

But for 350 you could also look for a used MIM Fender. They go for slightly over 400 new so 350 used shouldn't be to hard to find. The main advantage of the MIM Fenders is that it has tremendous modding potential. Though both Schecter and Ibanez make excellent basses for rock and metal.
#6
Alright well im not looking to seriously mod or anything I just want to buy something that wont break after two months

I am not even gonna touch the thunderbird now.


I was wondering a few more things does a 5 string have any real advantage over a 4 string?

Where could I find the fenders for New for $400 because the cheapest I could find was like $475?

Right now I am kinda leaning towards the schecter.

Thank you, More advice welcome


Oh yeah, the type of rock I play is everthing to Avenged Sevenfold to Nirvana
#7
Fender MIM Precision bass is the best bet.
Fender '51 Precision Bass
Hofner Verythin LTD Edition Guitar in Walnut w/ Bigsby
Engelhardt ES9 Upright Bass
1968 Trayner YBA 1A MK II Amp
w/ 6x10 cabinet

www.iaminlimbo.com
#9
Quote by 2+2=22

I was wondering a few more things does a 5 string have any real advantage over a 4 string?


Five more notes available below your bottom E of course, but the main advantage is having more notes within reach from one hand position - you can play across the neck instead of up and down.

Disadvantages of course are wider necks which many find uncomfortable (me included), heavier and generally more expensive than four string basses of the same quality "tier". And 5'er bass strings are usually disproportionately more expensive than four string sets.

I'd personally go for a used Fender. Your bass can grow as you do that way.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#10
Ok so I should start looking for a used Fender, Now is there any huge difference in sound between the precision bass and jazz bass?

And would a fretless bass be good?

And could you possibly give me any websites that have a good prices on these?


Thank you
Last edited by 2+2=22 at Aug 18, 2007,
#11
fretlesses i woulnt reccomend if you havent been playing for a good while, and thats prolly alot more money.

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#12
Quote by 2+2=22
Ok so I should start looking for a used Fender, Now is there any huge difference in sound between the precision bass and jazz bass?

And would a fretless bass be good?

And could you possibly give me any websites that have a good prices on these?


Thank you


Sound difference between Precisions and Jazzes is pretty big.

P-basses have basically, one sound. For P fans, it's the sound and they don't need any others. It's very low-mids, bass heavy and punchy. And also a sound that sits well with almost any kind of music without much need for twiddling. Very popular with punk and rock players, and the motown bass tone is a P strung with flatwounds, this setup is used by Steve Harris from Iron Maiden, Roger Waters (at least on Money), etc. The P is all over early rock and roll records from the 50's and 60's.

J-basses are very, very versatile. The two pickups give a lot of scope for tone so you can pretty much dial in something suitable for anything. You can get a very trebley bite from the bridge (though solo the bridge pickup and roll back the tone, you get a very mellow sound suitable for fusion-esque soloing), and a darker, more P-like tone (though you'll never quite get a P tone from a J) from the neck, but the Jazz has a more growly and cutting tone to the P's gut-punch. Famous Jazz players are a dime a dozen. Lots of funk bassists, Geddy Lee (though he has his own sig now), I believe a Jazz with flatwound strings was used for Led Zeppelins first few albums. I'm fairly certain the Jazz overtook the P in popularity terms a long time ago for it's sheer adaptability.

Jazzes are the archetypical slap bass, too. While you can slap on a P, the tone you get will not be entirely ideal. I'll assume you know about the thicker P neck vs slimmer Jazz, so I won't get on with that.

I'm a no-looking-back Precision fan, for the record.

For fretless vs fretted... I personally wouldn't get a fretless as my only or main bass if I'd only ever played fretted. Get to the point where you're very proficient and comfortable with a fretted bass, then pick up a fretless on the side. It's a very steep learning curve and requires a lot of work to play fretless well.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#13
Jazz bass has a much smoother sound, P bass has a crunchier, rougher sound.

It's really based on preference, but I really like the Jazz sound a bunch more.

If you look around used, you can probably find a Deluxe Fender P bass. Which is the best combination of the P and J bass. One P pick-up on the neck, and a Jazz on the bridge, with the thin jazz neck.


You can find them for around $350 used
(looks at sig. )
#14
Quote by BlueShox


If you look around used, you can probably find a Deluxe Fender P bass. Which is the best combination of the P and J bass. One P pick-up on the neck, and a Jazz on the bridge, with the thin jazz neck.


You can find them for around $350 used
(looks at sig. )


The issue I have with Deluxe Precisions is that the Jazz pickup they fit to them is noticeably underpowerered compared to the P. I love Fender basses, but P/J combo basses are not their strong point. I much prefer Yamaha, etc for that sort of thing.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#15
I agree, thats kind of why I'm trying to get rid of mine. It's a great bass, but it does the P-pickup really well, and the J-Pickup halfway. And the Jazz is what I wanted in the first place
#16
Alright well I have pretty much decided I want either Fender Jazz or the Schecter it will probably come down to which ever I can get for cheaper, I would prefer the fender though.


Thanks everyone for the advice
#18
ESP LTD F104

i bought it for 300 bucks great bass. nice look to it too.

a 5 string is good for drop tuning without having to switch basses or if some songs call for a deeper sound and having a drop tuned bass on another 1 for another different sound.
atleast thats my take on it. i got an ibanez 5 string. i like it for what its worth, its in bad shape and the electronics are weird cuz i bought it used. (125 was too good to say no) but im pretty happy with it. but there are still many basses that get more than by on just a 4 string.

EDIT: sry to be that @$$hole to suggest a bass thats not on the list...but it's still a great bass.
Last edited by Crazy Horse at Aug 21, 2007,
#19
Don't buy an epi bass, ever! I don't think Ibanez are very versatile. I haven't played a Schecter, so I wouldn't know. I would look for a used Fender.
Last edited by Captain Insano at Aug 21, 2007,
#20
Quote by Caustic
Sound difference between Precisions and Jazzes is pretty big.

P-basses have basically, one sound. For P fans, it's the sound and they don't need any others. It's very low-mids, bass heavy and punchy. And also a sound that sits well with almost any kind of music without much need for twiddling. Very popular with punk and rock players, and the motown bass tone is a P strung with flatwounds, this setup is used by Steve Harris from Iron Maiden, Roger Waters (at least on Money), etc. The P is all over early rock and roll records from the 50's and 60's.

J-basses are very, very versatile. The two pickups give a lot of scope for tone so you can pretty much dial in something suitable for anything. You can get a very trebley bite from the bridge (though solo the bridge pickup and roll back the tone, you get a very mellow sound suitable for fusion-esque soloing), and a darker, more P-like tone (though you'll never quite get a P tone from a J) from the neck, but the Jazz has a more growly and cutting tone to the P's gut-punch. Famous Jazz players are a dime a dozen. Lots of funk bassists, Geddy Lee (though he has his own sig now), I believe a Jazz with flatwound strings was used for Led Zeppelins first few albums. I'm fairly certain the Jazz overtook the P in popularity terms a long time ago for it's sheer adaptability.

Jazzes are the archetypical slap bass, too. While you can slap on a P, the tone you get will not be entirely ideal. I'll assume you know about the thicker P neck vs slimmer Jazz, so I won't get on with that.

I'm a no-looking-back Precision fan, for the record.

For fretless vs fretted... I personally wouldn't get a fretless as my only or main bass if I'd only ever played fretted. Get to the point where you're very proficient and comfortable with a fretted bass, then pick up a fretless on the side. It's a very steep learning curve and requires a lot of work to play fretless well.

+1.
#21
Quote by Caustic
Sound difference between Precisions and Jazzes is pretty big.

P-basses have basically, one sound. For P fans, it's the sound and they don't need any others. It's very low-mids, bass heavy and punchy. And also a sound that sits well with almost any kind of music without much need for twiddling. Very popular with punk and rock players, and the motown bass tone is a P strung with flatwounds, this setup is used by Steve Harris from Iron Maiden, Roger Waters (at least on Money), etc. The P is all over early rock and roll records from the 50's and 60's.

J-basses are very, very versatile. The two pickups give a lot of scope for tone so you can pretty much dial in something suitable for anything. You can get a very trebley bite from the bridge (though solo the bridge pickup and roll back the tone, you get a very mellow sound suitable for fusion-esque soloing), and a darker, more P-like tone (though you'll never quite get a P tone from a J) from the neck, but the Jazz has a more growly and cutting tone to the P's gut-punch. Famous Jazz players are a dime a dozen. Lots of funk bassists, Geddy Lee (though he has his own sig now), I believe a Jazz with flatwound strings was used for Led Zeppelins first few albums. I'm fairly certain the Jazz overtook the P in popularity terms a long time ago for it's sheer adaptability.

Jazzes are the archetypical slap bass, too. While you can slap on a P, the tone you get will not be entirely ideal. I'll assume you know about the thicker P neck vs slimmer Jazz, so I won't get on with that.

I'm a no-looking-back Precision fan, for the record.

For fretless vs fretted... I personally wouldn't get a fretless as my only or main bass if I'd only ever played fretted. Get to the point where you're very proficient and comfortable with a fretted bass, then pick up a fretless on the side. It's a very steep learning curve and requires a lot of work to play fretless well.

This guy pretty much has it covered.

Right now, the best thing to do in your situation is to just find some basses you might want and try them out yourself to see what you want tone-wise and which is the most comfortable for you to play. Find a P-bass and a Jazz and try them, and I would probably find that Schecter and try it as well.
#22
I've always been a big Ibanez guy although I never played the sr 300 series but I have played the 500 series and I love them.
#23
Ok guys well I went to my local guitar store and I couldnt find a nice used guitar that I liked. The guy kept recomending the squire vintage 70s bass. I dont think I want another squire though because the one I have isnt bad, but its not really good either. I always seem to have sound problems with frets buzzing ridiculously bad to the point that its just irritating. Thanks for the help though.
#24
loook into a dean ML- it sells 350$ and its the bass i have. i absoulutely love it. i used the same bass as you until i bought this- and i never, ever wanted to play another bass since. (besides fretless, i almost bought one last week) =\

definitely go for it.
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