#1
so i'm learning the modes and i play A dorian like this:

-------------------------------------
--------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
-----------------------4-5-7------
--------------3-5-7---------------
--------5-7------------------------


but every article about modes i've read tells me to play it like this:


-------------------------------------
--------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------------------------5-7------
---------------5-7-8--------------
--------5-7-8-----------------------


they're the same notes...would i be playing A Dorian wrong if i do it that way???
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#3
they're not the same notes. the bottom one is A aeolian. (natural minor)
the top one is A dorian, but it might make more sense to play it like the second example
just move the 8th fret on the A string up to the 9th so that it's an F#
that way the root is the bottom fret...
Last edited by phoenix_88 at Aug 21, 2007,
#5
you're thinking outside the box, that's good
-------------------------------------------------
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#6
Quote by Aplanken
you're thinking outside the box, that's good

i was actually trying to make it as simple as i could so it would be easy to memorize lol
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#7
guys. they aren't the same notes.
the 4th fret on the D string (as seen in first example) is an F#. which is in A dorian.
the 8th fret on the A string (as seen in second example) is an F natural. which is not in A dorian, but IS in a aeolian.

neither are improper ways to play either of those scales, just playing a scale like the second tends to make more visual sense because it's its own box
while the second makes more theory sense, as you're using the G maj. box (which is where you get A dorian)

hope that helps.
#8
^
now??

-------------------------------------
--------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------------------------5-7------
---------------5-7-9--------------
--------5-7-8-----------------------
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#9
wtf did noone listen to phoenix? there not the same notes, the 6th note in the first(dorian) is an F#, while the second mode there(aoelian) is an F natural...so yes it would be wrong to play that fingering as you would be in an entirely different mode. remember the 6th note is the note that determines the sound of this mode, sharp6th(dorian), natural6th(aoelian).
#10
Quote by blues-guitarist
^
now??

-------------------------------------
--------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
------------------------5-7------
---------------5-7-9--------------
--------5-7-8-----------------------


yep!
you could play it that way, or your way. they're the same thing. but if you wanted to jam over something using A dorian, it might make more sense to use that scale because the other one may tend to sound a bit more like G maj.

(thanks beaker haha)
#11
Quote by phoenix_88
yep!
you could play it that way, or your way. they're the same thing. but if you wanted to jam over something using A dorian, it might make more sense to use that scale because the other one may tend to sound a bit more like G maj.

(thanks beaker haha)


thanks
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#12
remember to stress out that sixth note though, else it could just end up sounding like pentatonic with passing notes and will lose its character altogether.