#1
ok... i just finished memorizing the modes, now....how do i use them??? i tried reading the sticky but didn't really understand it....can i use them like scales?? if someone is playing something like A D E, could i just pick a mode and solo with it in A??? like A Phrygian??
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#2
for some ideas

heres a video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOV7iKR1vE
he's playing the same group of notes, but he changes to chord progression to have a different tonal centre and a very different sound

and heres another video, this time Joe Satriani
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SckVz3XpLs
playing different modes in but over the same root, you could for example write a song and change the chord or riffs appropriately to give it a different sound
#3
Quote by seljer
for some ideas

heres a video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOV7iKR1vE
he's playing the same group of notes, but he changes to chord progression to have a different tonal centre and a very different sound

and heres another video, this time Joe Satriani
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SckVz3XpLs
playing different modes in but over the same root, you could for example write a song and change the chord or riffs appropriately to give it a different sound

thanks
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#4
the first video sounded kool but i couldnt understand what he was saying =/
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<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
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#5
anyone else??? i didn't really get an answer
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#6
^For some reason whenever someone asks this people always give you an indirect answer.

Modes are just scales starting on a different note. Your in the same key, your just starting and probably ending on a different note.

I've given this example so many times, but since its the easiest I'll just do it again. You take any scale - say C Major. Instead of starting on C all the time, say you want to start on another note let's say A. By starting on A your still playing in the Key of C and using the C Major scale (C D E F G A B) but you get a different feeling than C Ionian (or the C Major scale) your playing in the Aeolian mode. So its Key of C Major, C Major Scale and Aeolian mode. It's also called the A Minor Scale as well so watch out.

So if you want to play in Dorian instead just start on D (D E F G A B C) Or any other scale all you have to do is find the mode in one of the scales and then every half step up on the scale you go, you get another mode. For example the B Jewish Scale goes B C D# E F# G A and its in the key of B with a phygrian mode. So if you want to play a half step up at A# in the Jewish scale you just count up the modes and you get Dorian. The Modes go Ionian, Dorian, Phygrian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian. So if you find Lydian in say Norwegian wood by the Beatles but you want to play a step up - you would find yourself in the Phygiran mode.
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#7
^ so modes are just scales to use instead of the major scale to get different feelings and not play the same scale over and over, right?
"There's Jimmy Page, the greatest thief of American black music who ever walked the earth."
-Homer Simpson
#8
Yes, while staying in key.
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#9
Quote by blues-guitarist
if someone is playing something like A D E, could i just pick a mode and solo with it in A??? like A Phrygian??


chord progression A D E is in A Ionian (chords are A Bm C#m D E F#m G#dim), A phrygian scale will not sound good over it, but you can play A Ionian, or B dorian, or C# phrygian, etc...
#10
Quote by blues-guitarist
^ so modes are just scales to use instead of the major scale to get different feelings and not play the same scale over and over, right?


AFAIK other scales have modes too, for example pentatonics and natural minor, but they're not used as much.

I don't really understand the concept of modal pentatonics either, but there's some information about them in the sticky, which I suggest you read.
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#11
Quote by Kailoq
AFAIK other scales have modes too, for example pentatonics and natural minor, but they're not used as much.

I don't really understand the concept of modal pentatonics either, but there's some information about them in the sticky, which I suggest you read.


the natural minor IS the aeolian mode

the sets of modes you get from the harmonic and melodic minors you get are also very interesting


haven't really looked into pentatonic modes myself
#12
Okay, a mode of the major scale contains the same notes as the major scale, but the root is a different note. This is just explaining where modes come from, but I don't think of them like this when actually using them.
D Ionian (major) is D E F# G A B C#
E Dorian (second mode) is E F# G A B C# D
A mixolydian (fifth mode) is A B C# D E F# G
They contain the same notes but start on different root notes.

So, they contain the same notes but they are definately different scales. I think of modes as alterations to the major scale.
Ionian (Major) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian (Natural Minor) 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

So, for F Phrygian you start with the F major scale, F G A Bb C D E
Then flatten the 2 3 6 and 7 to get 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
And you end up with the notes F Gb Ab Bb C Db Eb.

Now, when playing modes over chords, look at the intervals making up the chord and the intervals making up the mode. If they match up, they will sound good together.
Say a Cm chord comes up, thats 1 b3 5. Look at the modes and you see that Dorian, Phrygian and Aeolian all contain those intervals.
So you could play C Dorian, C Phrygian or C Aeolian, which one you chose will give a different feel.
Now if an Amaj7 comes along, thats 1 3 5 7. Compare that to the modes and you see that you can play A Ionian or A Lydian, againg giving different feels.
What about a Bbm7b5? You see that the only mode with 1 b3 b5 b7 is Locrian, so you can play Bb Locrian
With an E7 (1 3 5 b7) you find that only Mixolydian fits, so you can play E mixolydian

Remember none of this is law, it's just a guide so don't be afraid to experiment.
Hope this helps

The way to use modes and get their different sounds is to think of the intervals it is made up of. Phrygian has a b2, a dark, dissononant interval. Lydian has a #4, which sounds... I dunno how to describe it but it sounds cool. Mixolydian is like the major scale but has a b7, making it bluesy and dominant.

Just drone the low E string, keep it ringing (clean setting works best). Then on the remaining five stings, play E Phrygian, E lydian, E Aeloian, E Ionian etc. and emphasise the unique intervals in each. Really listen to each scales' characteristics. Try making a melody from each mode while droning the E string.

Once you have done this, watch this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoGQ9yHOyZQ
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#13
Quote by seljer
the natural minor IS the aeolian mode

the sets of modes you get from the harmonic and melodic minors you get are also very interesting


haven't really looked into pentatonic modes myself


Bleh, I meant harmonic minor, really!
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