#1
Here's how it works. You post something about music theory - preferably advanced - that you wouldn't expect the user above you to know.

I'll start it off with some rhythm theory - you can choose any branch of theory - since people laughed at me when I asked questions about this saying it doesn't exist. Well I am actually taking a jazz class that in the introduction to the book by Dr. Larry Grandy states a little theory about this.

"In a 5/4 time signature the first and fourth beats are strong beats while the second, third and fifth beats are weak beats. This is significant because most popular music, including jazz and rock, artificially stress or accent the weak beats. This articifical stressing of weak beats is called syncopation. Words and harmonies change on strong beats while the weak beats are "artificially" accented, providing a forward drive or momentum. In rock drumming, the bass drum usually provides the kick for the strong beats while the snare drum or hi-hate accent the weak beats." ~ A History of Jazz and Rock by Dr. Larry Grandy
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#2
We copying wikipedia now? I have read that article so many times I practically have it memorized.

Ending a section of a piece written in a minor key with a major chord is called a Picardy Third
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#3
^ Any examples? (songs, etc)
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#4
^Many many classical songs. They do it for the resolution, because a major chord is more stable than a minor chord.

A popular tune that does it is Classical Gas by Mason Williams.
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#5
^ Ok, to clear things up, a resolution is when a progression comes to an end, and goes back to the I (root) chord?
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#6
^You are thinking of certain cadences, like the perfect or plagal cadence.
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#7
I got one for ya. There's a form of music called 'serialism' in which it is allowed to use all 12 notes of the chromatic scale equally, but they come in a fixed order: one note is always followed by one perticular other note (only exception is you can work backwards too).
#8
^Strange, someone brought up Schoenberg the other day, and he's the guy that is credited with creating the twelve tone row.

As far as I know, some have taken those ideas to the extreme in that you can't repeat rhythms as well. I think it's interesting that when music is given the most structure possible, where almost everything is decided by math and formula, it sounds like total chaos.
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#9
Free jazz is about throwing theory out the window and playing for the sake of playing. Look up Derek Bailey.
Vocal Chords.
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#10
Look up John Cage for something even more insane.
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#11
Ummm... when doing baroque styled voice leading, if the root of two chords are a 4th or 5th apart, then move the rest of the chord with similar* motion and keep the common tone.

*Similar, not parallel. God help you if you write a parallel 5th...

EDIT: Oh man, I wish I remembered the specifics of Schoenberg's stuff. Learned it a good two years ago and the concepts stuck, but not the nitty gritty. I think I have my weekend cut out for me now.
Last edited by troyponce at Aug 23, 2007,
#12
^In a similar way

You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
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#13
Quote by nightwind
^In a similar way

You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.

There is no way that text can convey how hard I just laughed at that. You, sir, have just been sig'd.
#14
German music theory uses the note name "H"
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#15
Quote by copet
German music theory uses the note name "H"


That is same as American B.
But they call a Bb = B.
I grew up in that note system. Can you imagine what confusion was when I, as a newbie entered UG.
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#16
normal metal song should be cuttet into 4,8 or 16 bars cause it's usually what the lsitener expect of the music as these numbers of bars sound complete and not as if they weren't finished yet, for transistionsyou can well add 4 bars to a 8 bars part becausen then the listener expects thatthere wil be happening something

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#17
Umm...here's a pretty simple one. In general, raised notes resolve upwards and flattened notes resolve downwards.