#1
Is it OK to buy two thin planks at Lowes or home depot and glue them together when makeing a guitar body (mostly for practice, I want to mess up on somthing cheap first)?
#3
Thats the idea of messing around with something cheap. Keep it on mind that luthers buy wood that is kept for severval years in special storehouse. The wood you'll buy will "work" for some time after you buy it. Your guitar just might "grow" in most unexpected way...
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#4
Okay, I was thinking either poplar or alder if I can find it, I know poplar is much softer, but will that make it easier or harder to work with? also, how would I go about glueing them together?
#5
wood glue and then clamp, leave for overnight
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#6
Most of the wood at Home depot is too green to build with. If you buy it from there, you need to kiln dry it or let it sit around your house for a couple years.
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#7
One other question. About 5 years ago my dad cut down a pretty big poplar to make room for a gate. We still have most of the wood and the trunk was probabably over24 inches in diameter. Is there anything preventing me from using this?
#9
If you're buying wood to practice on, just buy a few feet of pine. Save the poplar for when you build a real body.
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#10
Quote by sean tee
One other question. About 5 years ago my dad cut down a pretty big poplar to make room for a gate. We still have most of the wood and the trunk was probabably over24 inches in diameter. Is there anything preventing me from using this?


Poplar needs about a year per inch of thickness to dry so you still need to rip it into boards and let it dry properly.
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#11
Quote by sean tee
Okay, I was thinking either poplar or alder if I can find it, I know poplar is much softer, but will that make it easier or harder to work with? also, how would I go about glueing them together?

They have poplar at my Menards, and it wasn't green like their pine. It seemed hard and dry. I'm no expert though. They didn't have Alder.
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#12
Thanks for the help, but does anyone know if poplar's softness makes it easier or more difficult to work on?
#13
you can use pine to make a practice guitar or to practice on, i do it all the time when i need to make sure everythings set right.
#14
Quote by carousel182
you can use pine to make a practice guitar or to practice on, i do it all the time when i need to make sure everythings set right.

Agreed! A Pinecaster or Fender Esquire looks like an attractive option. So here's the PineCaster in Action.



Furniture-grade Pine (if it's available) would probably work great.