#1
What is the point of Mixer Boards when you can adjust EQ and other such things on Computer Programs?
#2
well, i guess it's way more handful if you got he inputs you need whichis usually to many for a simple computer andit's probably easier to get the right tuning on a mixer board..according to this itÄ's probably just another feeling o work with a mixer board or a pc
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#3
most sound cards have one type of input

example
the m-audio 2496 has RCA ins and outs so it's hard to hook up any more than an MP3 player to that without the right cords.

now say you get a Yamaha MG mixer. They have RCA outputs for the "record out" bus so you can use some dual RCA cord to connect to say the 2496 sound card.
Having the mixer on desk is also handy...no trying to fine tune everything with a mouse...its just easier to adjust an actual knob. Thats just one of the many reaons they came out with Controls like these:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Mackie-Control-Extender?sku=700341
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigation/computer-recording-systems?N=100001+306363&Ntk=All&Ntt=control&Nty=1
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Evolution-MK449C-MIDI-Controller?sku=700641


With that you can go "mixerless" but still have buttons and faders to set what they control in any recording program like Sonar.

Mixers are not required but can be very handy.
#4
you can go wihtout a mixer, there are some studios that just have a bunch of mic pres and a computer, i thought that was a sweet idea, but it turns out not having everythiing nice and neat on a mixer really sucks
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#5
Mixing boards mainly have an EQ for when you're doing some live recording, its handy to have an EQ on the console for making some tweaks.

Some good analogue mixing consoles like the SSL or NEVE have a really good sounding EQ which is better then the software version. Usually analogue EQ (or anything) is better than a software interpretation of that. Its better quality, it sounds better.

As i've worked in a recording studio, the bands are usually only in for a 6hour session to record 2 demo's or something. You use the analogue mixing desk to record the band. You don't usually have the time for editing it on Pro Tools n stuff. You just load up the instruments on the channels, get good levels in and record the band parts onto a "tape machine" on which you make minor editing (if needed) like drop ins (where you record a lil part over an existing part that didn't come down well). Once you've done that, you play the recorded tracks back from the "tape player" back into the mixer. This time you mix the track. Get a good mix, send the final mix to the CD burner and you've got yer demo on the CD!!
No Pro Tools or Cubase or Logic involved!!

Well, why did i go through all of that...
To answer your question! When you're mixing the track for the final mix, you need to make dynamic adjustments, EQ, Compressor, reverb, delay and all if necessary.
Usually EQing is the most basic and necessary dynamics processing you'ld need the track to go through. Now if you've got $100000 worth of external hardware effects processors, you can use them for the EQing, Compression, reverb, delay and all...
But if you don't you'll hafta live with the on board EQ.

So, its used for when you are not using pro tools and logic to record but are just using the mixer and a recorder (digital or analogue, hardly anyone uses analogue tapes anymore! They're a mess to work with!!)

I hope that helped clearing your question...
#6
Quote by af_the_fragile
Mixing boards mainly have an EQ for when you're doing some live recording, its handy to have an EQ on the console for making some tweaks.

Some good analogue mixing consoles like the SSL or NEVE have a really good sounding EQ which is better then the software version. Usually analogue EQ (or anything) is better than a software interpretation of that. Its better quality, it sounds better.

As i've worked in a recording studio, the bands are usually only in for a 6hour session to record 2 demo's or something. You use the analogue mixing desk to record the band. You don't usually have the time for editing it on Pro Tools n stuff. You just load up the instruments on the channels, get good levels in and record the band parts onto a "tape machine" on which you make minor editing (if needed) like drop ins (where you record a lil part over an existing part that didn't come down well). Once you've done that, you play the recorded tracks back from the "tape player" back into the mixer. This time you mix the track. Get a good mix, send the final mix to the CD burner and you've got yer demo on the CD!!
No Pro Tools or Cubase or Logic involved!!

Well, why did i go through all of that...
To answer your question! When you're mixing the track for the final mix, you need to make dynamic adjustments, EQ, Compressor, reverb, delay and all if necessary.
Usually EQing is the most basic and necessary dynamics processing you'ld need the track to go through. Now if you've got $100000 worth of external hardware effects processors, you can use them for the EQing, Compression, reverb, delay and all...
But if you don't you'll hafta live with the on board EQ.

So, its used for when you are not using pro tools and logic to record but are just using the mixer and a recorder (digital or analogue, hardly anyone uses analogue tapes anymore! They're a mess to work with!!)

I hope that helped clearing your question...


Yeah, it did help a bit. So if I used a Mixer I wouldn't have to use Pro Tools at all? BTW, what exactly is Pro Tools? Also you said that I wouldn't have to use Cubase. What would I run the mixer into then? I'm a little lost by the "tape machine" are you talking about actual analogue tapes?
#7
Tape machines are those 8 track analog recorders:
http://www.sandroliva.com/CSR/902stu/T32.JPG
they run on 1.4" wide tape.

if you have a mixer you will still need to use pro tools and all that. he is saying if you have great even levels throughout the recording process you wont need to use it. Protools is a program that records each track on its own, drums on one track, vocals on another, and bass on yet another. After the main record you can go into it and adjust the volume on one track, say vocals without changing the volume of the other tracks.

F

you need a mixer with a bunch of outputs and a sound card or interface that has a lot of inputs.

The PreSonus FIREPOD is a good interface to use with a computer
and its your choice for the mixer...
have a look though Tweak's guide in my sig.
#8
Quote by im fresh to it
Yeah, it did help a bit. So if I used a Mixer I wouldn't have to use Pro Tools at all? BTW, what exactly is Pro Tools? Also you said that I wouldn't have to use Cubase. What would I run the mixer into then? I'm a little lost by the "tape machine" are you talking about actual analogue tapes?

Depends on the mixer you're using...
If you're using an analogue mixer, then you don't need a software, you can record it straight onto a recorder (if you have one). If you're using a digital mixer, then that needs to be connected to the computer to record the tracks on yer computers hard disk using a software like Pro Tools (though Pro Tools only works with Digidesign or M-Audio products).
This is a little 2-track digital recorder:
http://www.m-audio.com/products/en_us/MicroTrack2496-main.html

And this is an analogue mixer (well its a analogue digital hybrid, it processes it in analogue and then converts it in digital to send it to a computer software):
http://www.solid-state-logic.com/music/aws900plus.html

BTW, analogue signal is an electrical current and digital signal is 0's and 1's (binary).

Well "tape machines" are actually the old analogue tape recorders as moody said...
But like in the studio you even call the new digital hard disk recorders as "tape machines"...
Guess sound engineers are just used to calling them tape machine...

The new digital ones are like anywhere from 12 to 64 channel digital recorders. They record the track onto a hard disk and have a software that comes with it for some editing and naming tracks n stuff like that...

The one we had in our studio was iZ technologie's Radar 24.
This guy here...


It records what comes from the mixer onto a scuzzy hard disk and a larger back up disk.

Its just a bigger version of the digital recorders you get...


Pro Tools is a audio editing/sequencing and mastering software just like Cubase and Logic. But Pro Tools is the only industry standard software for digital audio recording.

Its just like Garage Band and all.. but a much more advanced version of them with way more and better quality/standard audio editing features...


And in my previous post, i was speaking bout recording a band in a studio through an analogue mixing console. You don't need pro tools or any other softwares for that. You need them if you're doing a digital recording.
Most producers prefer analogue consoles cuz they have a more organic and warmer sound to them than a digital console does. Thats why you find more tracks being recorded on SSL and NEVE consoles (analogue consoles) than you find on Pro Tools HD systems (digital consoles).
Like if you're doing a big recording for a band worth couple of million bucks, you're looking for a proper analogue recording being done on something like a $1m SSL console and they use real hardware effects processors rather than software plug-ins (which just mimic the hardware to an extent). Very rarely something like Pro Tools is used in an analogue recording. Its all mostly done using hardware. The result is a better sounding track which one a producer or a good sound engineer can easily differentiate from a digitally recorded track.
Though most bands now days are using both technologies to record their music. More digital consoles are being used and Pro Tools is being used a lot too...

Analogue seems to be dying out... Mostly cuz computers are getting better, digital is cheaper and most bands don't have a big recording budget nowdays to afford analogue recording on a good analogue desk like SSL or NEVE...
SSL and NEVE are making more digital desks nowdays too...

Analogue has seemed to become the stuff of the past... Though most producers still prefer the warm sound of the analogue...

Wow, i really went on a rant here!
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Aug 24, 2007,
#9
Thanks everyone for the help. One more quick question. Well actually kinda two.

If I were to use a digital mixer coupled with Pro Tools where would sound quality mostly come from? The mixer? The microphone?

Also, what is a compressor and are there both digital/computer compressors and actual physical compressors?
#10
everything effects the sound, i wouldnt worry about the mixer too much tho. yes there are actually compressors and compressor plugins. theres been a billion posts about wht is compression so seach it or go to wiki
Quote by ILuvPillows?
Masturbate it off.
#11
oh, and af_the_fragile, how is the radar 24?? ive been still using an older one, although we have a 24 everyones just too lazy to set it up tho.
Quote by ILuvPillows?
Masturbate it off.
#12
i've never used the old one...
We just had the Radar 24 in the studio...

Its quite easy to use imo... Its got a really good sound quality.
But yeah, like we used it record bands n ****... Its pretty simple to use... sorta, once you know what you're doing.
And i suck at writing reviews!!!


And bout sound quality, whenever you process a sound, its quality gets effected.
First it gets affected in the mixer/audio interface where its being converted from an analogue into a digital signal. Then it gets affected everytime you process the sound in pro tools.
Now whether its sounds better or bad is completely subjective and upto the individual. But usually analogue processors have a warmer sound to them than digital processors.
Though digital processors give a more accurate mix as it does it by adding up the binary numbers.
In an analogue mix, the signal being an electrical current will cause stuff like interference and all which will effect in the accuracy of the mix.

Your mic has its own sound characteristics, its not gonna give a flat even frequency response. It'll be more sensitive to a certain frequencies and less sensitive to others. That makes different mics sound different. That changes the sound first. Then your mixer will have its own characteristics. If its analogue, the electric signal going through all the circuits will get slightly altered by the time it comes out of the mixer. If its digital, the analogue to digital converter will have its own characters and will only be able to code the electrical signal into a binary code upto a certain extent. From there onwards every effect or anything you process the signal through is gonna change it tone...

And bout compressors, i posted a lil noobs tutorial bout compressors in the "production tips" thread. Check it out. Its in one of the last few pages of the thread...