#1
So looking at all the wide variety of humbucker pickups out there, I see different classifications, using different types of magnets, like Alnico something or other and ceramic based pickups, and others. But what's unique about a (hot) PAF humbucker?
#2
"Patent Applied For" humbucker.

they were used in the very early Les Pauls.
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#3
its based on a '59 Les Paul humbucker, and, depending on the model, might have some alterations to it. On the backplate of the pickup, it had "patent Applied For" stamped on it.
#5
and the "hot" implies it has relatively high output. high output pups are good for getting breakup from your tube amp quicker, and tend to bring out pinch harmonics and stuff like that better than normal. as far as output goes,it's like this: single coil, P-90, humbucker, active humbucker in order from lowest to highest ouput. gibson's website has a really great chart of the output of all the pickups they sell. it helped me settle on the 500T bucker for the bridge of my SG. never looked back. the thing is awesome
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#6
PAF's were one of the first attempts at creating a noiseless pickup, thus earning the name humbucker. Originally created by Seth Lover in 1956, they became stock equipment on several Gibson guitars in 1957, most notably the Les Paul. Until '59 they were all double black, and when the supplier ran out of black dye, many pickups were produced as zebra coil and double creme colored ones. This only mattered if you took the covers off as all original PAF's came with nickel covers. All of them had "Patent Applied For" stickers on the back as well as tooling marks specific to the PAF's (such as the "square within a circle" mark on the top of them)

PAF's used Alnico magnets but one thing to note is that there was no consistency in the grade of the magnets, therefore you could get a single set and have one with an Alnico 2 and one with an Alnico 5. All of them were hand wound and due to the lack of modern technology, they were usually wound slightly uneven. This made for quite a bit of variety in the tone and output of the originals. In 1960, Gibson was awarded a patent number and began producing essentially the same pickup with a patent number sticker on the bottom instead of the PAF sticker, for use in 1961 models. Also during this period, there was some changes to the magnets and some degree of maintaining consistency was introduced. As modern technology took over, the nuances of the original PAF died off. Many people consider early 60's patent number pickups to be functionally identical to the PAF, but when the mid 60's rolled around the changes had become so great that they were no longer the same thing. As such, a set of '61 pickups may command a price just slightly below what a set of original PAF's can, but a set of '67 pickups will go for considerably less. '59 and '60 pickups in zebra or double creme tend to sell for more than their double black counterparts. Either way, they're all pretty darn expensive.
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#7
It's the noise made when Asterix hits someone...
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#9
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#10
Quote by Kendall
PAF's were one of the first attempts at creating a noiseless pickup, thus earning the name humbucker. Originally created by Seth Lover in 1956, they became stock equipment on several Gibson guitars in 1957, most notably the Les Paul. Until '59 they .... etc etc


Kendall's post is entirely accurate, everybody listen to him.

When a pickup is advertised as 'the most accurate PAF' it's lying. All PAF's sounded different, the winding wasn't consistent, they were always playing with new magnets, and their method of putting it in the guitar was to create two and put them in at random, making alot of bridge pickups of the time sound rather weak and underpowered. PAF's are NOT the holy grail of guitar pickups - Some sound like CRAP, some sound absolutely GODLY.

There are alot of PAF clones, and I assure you - they may be like a small handful of PAF's created, but they do not sound the same as the majority. They are more like PAF+'s, a PAF in mind, and a modern pickup (with differentiation between Bridge and Neck, and several modern additions) in body.
#11
So what would some of these clones be? ^
Also which brands makes the clones?
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#12
^clones are like... GFS PAF vintage '59 and such... Seymour Duncan has the '59 model, which i like.
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#14
^i wonder if it's good tho...

i love the SD '59 model tho.
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#15
The virtue in "PAF clones" is that you can rest reasonably assured that if you buy another one just like it, it will sound the same. The closest any company has come to replicating PAF's detail for detail is with the Gibson Burstbucker pickups, however this creates an interesting paradox. Gibson has several models of the Burstbuckers available in an attempt to cover the full range of tones offered by the original PAF's (some of which are unevenly wound). However in order to get an authentic PAF sound, you would have to order several of each model, put them in a box, shake them up, and select two at random with no preference for bridge and neck location. If you're lucky, you can return the ones you didn't use (presuming you can figure out which is which).
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#16
the clone that Dimarzio make are called PAF pro's, they are awesome, joe satrianni has used them in the neck position on "surfing with the alien" I think *shrugs* one of his albums. cant go wrong with a PAF pro
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#17
Quote by ECistheBest
^clones are like... GFS PAF vintage '59 and such... Seymour Duncan has the '59 model, which i like.


If you like that, you might want to try the SD Seth Lover, its an amazing pickup, and they are all wound on the machine they bought from Seth Lover himself (who invented the humbucker..).
#18
Quote by Metal_Injection
the clone that Dimarzio make are called PAF pro's, they are awesome, joe satrianni has used them in the neck position on "surfing with the alien" I think *shrugs* one of his albums. cant go wrong with a PAF pro

The PAF Pro is a very different animal to a traditional PAF, if you want pure PAFyness I'd say go for the Seth Lover if you don't want to pay bucketloads.

If you have loads of money then Stephens Design do an excellent PAF clone.
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