#1
ok well i have been playing alot of rythem and i really want to get into lead and i barely know anything about it all i no is the minor pentatonic and the blues scale can someone plz tell me how i could get better at this
#2
You already know all you need for a good 60% of rock. Just get comfortable with the scales and their boxes up and down the neck.
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#4
you can do wonders with just the blues scales, try improving over a 12 bar blues until your fingers bleed, thats how you get better
and listen to the lead parts to the bands you like, itll help you hear what to play.
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#5
Quote by Calgone
You already know all you need for a good 60% of rock. Just get comfortable with the scales and their boxes up and down the neck.

No. Bad.

Don't think about scales in boxes. It might help you to learn them but it will restrict your composition if you continue with that. Learn all the notes and where they are the the fretboard, then study your theory until you understand chords, intervals, and the relationships in music. Then you can really start to write some serious leads. I'm a strong believer in the "don't halfass this" philosophy in music. Learn, then play.
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#7
Quote by troyponce
No. Bad.

Don't think about scales in boxes. It might help you to learn them but it will restrict your composition if you continue with that. Learn all the notes and where they are the the fretboard, then study your theory until you understand chords, intervals, and the relationships in music. Then you can really start to write some serious leads. I'm a strong believer in the "don't halfass this" philosophy in music. Learn, then play.


Precisely.

The whole boxes thing screwed me around until i started going for music lessons. IF you just learn the patterns in boxes and have no clue why or what you are playing, all your solos will sound relatively the same, and stale.

Chord Theory, if one could call it that, is very important even for lead! Intervals and harmony etc can be learnt by familiarise yourself with chords and the theory behind it. It's all a natural process imo, you shouldn't learn to sweep pick without first learning Major 7th Harmony, for example.
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#8
Boxes are good for someone just starting to play lead. Just stick within your little box and work on your phrasing. At the same time you should be learning some theory. You can either learn the notes all over the fretboard or you can learn the shapes of the scales all over the fretboard, the aim is to not be limited and have complete confidence and control over your sound.

For some really good ideas for soloing watch Marty Friedman's 'Melodic Control' on Google Videos. He describes what is going on in his head while soloing. Basically its about following the chords and target notes. Even if you dont get most of what he is saying, some of his genius may osmosis into you.
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