#1
I'm trying to get into writing some lead guitar parts for a hardcore project my friends and I are working on. I don't know a whole lot of theory outside of what is in the lessons section of UG, and its a little tough for me to comprehend. I know of the pentatonic, major, etc scales. How should I go about writing some lead? Can I simply use the notes in a scale (in the correct key) to form the song? I'm a beginner-ish, any help would be awesome. Thanks
#2
no no no keep it simple just make **** up have fun make what you want to hear after that you can start worrying about theory but myself, i wouldnt worry about theory
#3
It always starts with a nice simple chord progression. The easiest songs to write are in major (for me atleast) so a simple progression to fit under major is a II-V-I (2-5-1).

I find the best songs to write when your a beginner are jazz style (simple head/chorus which you repeat twice then go into a solo section) So with the 2-5-1 progression you simply wank around on a major scale in desired key. You can switch it up if you want but i wont get too complicated on you.

PM me if u have trouble with this.
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#5
the only scales ive learned are these

------------------------------------------------------5---8-
--------------------------------------------5----8----------
------------------------------------5---7-------------------
----------------------------5---7------------------------
---------------5------7----------------------------------
----5----8----------------------------------------------- which i assume is a Minor Pentatonic?

and

---------------------------------------------------------------------------10--12--13--15--17--19--20
-----------------------------------------------------------10--12--13---------------------
----------------------------------------------9--10--12--------------------------------
--------------------------------9--10--12------------------------------------------------
------------------8--10--12---------------------------------------------------------------
----8--10--12-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Which i believe is an A Major scale?

correct me if im wrong please.

ya so really i just found that putting two scales together like that works well, i mean, i played joker and the theif at a talent show at school and made up a solo with those two scales because i realized theat the intro fits in with the pentatonic and in turn the pentatonic fits with the Major higher up, and you can move it around as well. That really helped me in my improv, but sadly the only solos i can create without sounding boring is jazz solos lol.
#6
Maybe I'm using the wrong term for it, but I want to put stuff other than chords into the song. Single string stuff yadida? What we have down so far for most of out songs is pretty much a chord progression, and I want to add some more too it. Just chords don't do it for me. I know stuff has to be in key, otherwise it usually doesn't sount particularly pleasant. One song for example is in E.. can I use the notes from a pentatonic? major? etc etc. How do I go about it? I know its kind of a vague question, but I'm a little lost.
#7
well, what i did when learning to play leads, is for example, take a song you know with a cool lick in it that you like, figure out what key,scale,mode etc. its in and where it ends up on the neck according to the "main" box scale you know, like the minor pentatonic and such. now take the song your playing to, and relate that scale your in to the lick you wanna play, to put it in laymans terms... lets say the riff starts 5 frets above the highest note in the scale in the song, simply do the same only transposed to the key of your song, however this wont always work, if the feel of one of the 2 songs in different than eachother it wuld be difficult to transpose, but sound unique if u can pull it off.

thats one way, another is just plain experimenting with things, shred up and down the scale, acend/decend in triplets.

--15-14-12---14-12------12----------------------- decending in triplets, to acend simply
------------------------15------15-13---15-13-12- simply start from the other end of the
-------------------------------------------------------- box.
--------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------

and arpeggios sound nice too


---16-12----- this is a basic minor arpeggio (when transposing this the root note is
-----------14- third note, in this case its a C#
---------------
---------------
---------------
---------------


that is all in minors, from what you typed i assumed u were playing rock/metal, but if you want anything else just gimme a ring
#8
just take influence of your bands copy the progression and idea of what your hardcore(bull****) bands
#9
Well, it's really simple. The minor pentatonic can be moved anywhere on the fretboard to achieve different keys. Find the key of the song you want to play lead over, and improvise in the minor pentatonic for that key.

IE:

Song in C, start your pentatonic on 8th fret.
Song in A, start it at the 5th.
Song in D, start at the 10th.

So on, so forth.
#10
Quote by Mark Wylie
no no no keep it simple just make **** up have fun make what you want to hear after that you can start worrying about theory but myself, i wouldnt worry about theory

You need to click that little back button in the top-left corner of your brower until you are out of MT.


Hardcore solos often rely on palm muted scale runs. If you need to shift octaves, that's one of the best ways to do it in that context, as sweeps will frequently sound out of place. You also really need a climax for the solo. A climactic little lick that works almost anywhere in hardcore is shown below:


|-------15-------15-------15b17r13----|
|-12h13----12h13----12h13-------------|
|-------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------|


Toss that in and end out your solo with a harmony in thirds.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#11
Wylde, I think I understand what you mean. Say a song does ---------15-14-12---12-10-8---- on whatever string. Pretend thats in the key of A (I don't know what it really is). And I wanted to make it into C or something I would just make it like --------13-12-10---10-8-6----?
#12
Just to clarify, it isn't really a killer solo I'm trying to achieve at this point in time (hopefully it will come later, I still kinda stuck). I just want something to make the current chord progression sound more interesting. Something to play along with a chord progression in the verses/choruses and whatever. I guess that's kind of a solo, but by no means is it improvised.
#13
Quote by gdawg5758
Just to clarify, it isn't really a killer solo I'm trying to achieve at this point in time (hopefully it will come later, I still kinda stuck). I just want something to make the current chord progression sound more interesting. Something to play along with a chord progression in the verses/choruses and whatever. I guess that's kind of a solo, but by no means is it improvised.

You could fall back on the old stereotyped pattern of dicking around with the Bb major arpeggio with an added Eb... assuming you are writing in C minor. You'll get a sound like the intro to End of Heartache or the end of 94 Hours, if that's what you are looking for.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#14
Quote by SuPaGrAm
It always starts with a nice simple chord progression. The easiest songs to write are in major (for me atleast) so a simple progression to fit under major is a II-V-I (2-5-1).

I find the best songs to write when your a beginner are jazz style (simple head/chorus which you repeat twice then go into a solo section) So with the 2-5-1 progression you simply wank around on a major scale in desired key. You can switch it up if you want but i wont get too complicated on you.

PM me if u have trouble with this.


lolzzz

He says he wants to write leads for his "hardcore project." Imagine in the middle of one of their little "breakdowns" they just go into a swinging II-V-I-VI. That would be sweet.
#15
Quote by I floss daily
lolzzz

He says he wants to write leads for his "hardcore project." Imagine in the middle of one of their little "breakdowns" they just go into a swinging II-V-I-VI. That would be sweet.

Into the Moat does that live, and Strapping Young Lad does something in that vein on the song Antiproduct.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#16
lol im in a band and we're doing alrite and my lead guitarist doesnt do anything with scales or crap, we just screw around till it sounds right, and it sounds awesome. but whatever floats your boat.
#17
dude harcores easy throw ot a quick riff or 2 then power and normal chords... then a quick riff again repeat...
#18
First of all when it comes to writing and playing your own music, their isnt really any rules at all. technically you can do anything as long as it sounds good. yes you do have to fallow the guide lines of music theory, but those are really just "guidelines" for music. second of all their is no real simple answer on how to write a solo. Their are people that spend their whole lives trying to master their music and write good songs and solos, and many dont succeed. My only real advice to you is make sure the chords to your songs are chords that fit with a certain key and mode. then just take that key and mode and try to work out a solo in it which sounds good to you according to the ryhtem and tone of the song. with practice and work over time you should be able to come up with some good stuff, if your deticated to you music. also hardcore doesnt usually have alot of really hard or complicated and involved solos. I love hardcore espiecally the local stuff, but most of it is pretty simple. Just remember your not going to get a straight textbook type answer. the only answer you can get to your question is an opinion from other people on what they think, in the end with righting your own stuff you really have to do it all on your own. theirs no one that can tell you how to write your song.
#19
gibsonboy is right. play what you think sounds good.

btw, im a lead guitarist in a hardcore band, and i tend to do the solos over breakdowns. if you are gonna try that approach, follow the speed of the breakdown. if it is a quick, uptempo breakdown, play a fast solo. slow breakdown, slow solo.

i'll use two of my solos as examples, the ending breakdown to our song "Love is For Liars" is a bit slow, so i used some octave chords. worked quite nicely. and the ending breakdown to our song, "Right Between the Eyes" is very quick, so i did some sweeping over it.

i'll link you for the mp3, cause im sure my describing was horrible.

myspace.com/loveina45

take note, im also a metal guitarist. all i know is metal, so some of my playing may reflect that.
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Last edited by djn419 at Aug 29, 2007,
#20
^^ Sounds good man.

I guess I just need to sit down a play a bunch of stuff. Its tough for me but it seems like there isn't much of a trick to it. Its just playing what sounds good.