#1
If I have a bunch of chords, how do I find the key so I know what to play over the chords?
#2
Look at the notes you are playing and figure out what key signature it fits into. You might have a key change as well, and should write your lead accordingly.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#3
So far, I have a few patterns, but all the chords are major, no sharps or flats yet. Isn't that C major
#7
if your playing a progression, whatever note "sounds best" to end on is usually the key of the song.
Im too full to swallow my pride!
#8
Quote by BlackFire_
C major sounds too happy for it though. Any alternatives?

A minor or E phrygian.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#11
Quote by stephen_rettie
look at the root notes. see what scale they all fit into

Well, not really. The root notes could fit in one key, but the 3rd, 5th (and 7th, etc) might not. Example: C major - G major progression. C and G both fit into Bb major, but E from the C major chord and B from the G major chord do not.

TS, what is the chord progression?
#13
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
those are the same notes as C major. how will that help?
Minor progressions, like those two, don't sound the same as major progressions. They sound either sadder or more exotic or more down beat or whatever. It's because of the minor chord that the progression resolves (finishes) on.


could be C dorian or even D dorian possibly something in mixolydian too
Not C dorian, thats in the key of Bb major. Bb major has a flat B and a flat A.
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Aug 29, 2007,
#15
Quote by demonofthenight
Minor progressions, like those two, don't sound the same as major progressions. They sound either sadder or more exotic or more down beat or whatever. It's because of the minor chord that the progression resolves (finishes) on.



i thought he was suggesting what scales to solo with. how would using those scales do anything different? given the progression, if the key is C major, playing E phrygian or A minor would literally sound the same. i would think sugesting something like C minor or something would make sense because thats actually a different set of notes.
#17
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i thought he was suggesting what scales to solo with. how would using those scales do anything different? given the progression, if the key is C major, playing E phrygian or A minor would literally sound the same. i would think sugesting something like C minor or something would make sense because thats actually a different set of notes.



someone knows what they're talking about!
#18
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i thought he was suggesting what scales to solo with. how would using those scales do anything different? given the progression, if the key is C major, playing E phrygian or A minor would literally sound the same. i would think sugesting something like C minor or something would make sense because thats actually a different set of notes.

It's the emphasis on certain notes and what you will resolve to that make it sound different. Playing C minor over C major is really just a bad idea, seeing as how you'll have to deal with the Ab, Bb, and Eb in there, when the Cmaj triad is CEG. Yeah, that Eb will sound incredible over that.[/sarcasm] Playing out of key doesn't help anything here.

Quote by Krusader187
someone knows what they're talking about!

No, he doesn't. Don't be so easily won over by arrogance begot by ignorance. Unless you are being sarcastic, in which case I apologize.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#19
well to be completely honest, I never figured the whole modes thing either, how can you make a completely identical set of notes sound different when switching modes?
#20
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i thought he was suggesting what scales to solo with. how would using those scales do anything different? given the progression, if the key is C major, playing E phrygian or A minor would literally sound the same. i would think sugesting something like C minor or something would make sense because thats actually a different set of notes.
You do know thats just a difference of transposing the song down three semitones, right. Your not actually changing anything, your just transposing it.

And unless your deaf in both ears (not just blind in one), playing a E phrygian with an E minor will sound a crap load different than playing a A aeolian with an A minor. Yes they use the same notes, but they use different intervals and that gives it a different feel. E phrygian just sounds more exotic (and slightly angrier).

Musicians take advantage of the fact the modes use the same notes, it really isn't a restriction.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#21
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Well, not really. The root notes could fit in one key, but the 3rd, 5th (and 7th, etc) might not. Example: C major - G major progression. C and G both fit into Bb major, but E from the C major chord and B from the G major chord do not.

TS, what is the chord progression?


+ A lot.

It's rather important to look at all the notes in each chord instead of just taking the root notes.