#1
i need help i have found out the hard way how important it is two know the note on the guitar like the back of your hand. and i was wondering if any one had any tips or trick that can help me. how did you do it?
#2
Quote by i am the kid
i need help i have found out the hard way how important it is two know the note on the guitar like the back of your hand. and i was wondering if any one had any tips or trick that can help me. how did you do it?

Learn to play the scales and think about what each note is as you play it.
Inhuman evil take down!
#3
practice sight reading. alot. start with easy rythems so u can concentrate on the notes.
i <3 my gibson.

proud member of the anti-ibanez milita. my rg1570 was the crappiest guitar i've ever owned.

Quote by Rankles
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#4
Quote by 18th_Angel
Learn to play the scales and think about what each note is as you play it.


so just play the scales but now the notes in the scale and learn them.
#5
Remembering where the bass note of each chord is helped me completely memorize the lower part of the neck.
#6
Quote by i am the kid
i need help i have found out the hard way how important it is two know the note on the guitar like the back of your hand. and i was wondering if any one had any tips or trick that can help me. how did you do it?


There are a few different ways to learn the notes on the fret board. The most important thing you should learn, before anything, is the basic concept.

Natural notes are a whole step apart with the exception of B and C, and E and F, which are a half-step apart. (That said, there is no B# and there is no E#. B# is a C, and E# is an F. I recommend never using the terms B# or E#).

A whole step on guitar is two frets.
A half step is one fret.

So if you played the fifth fret and then the seventh fret on your sixth string, then you would've played a whole step.

If you played the first fret and then the second fret, you would've played a half step.

With that knowledge, you can find any note on your fret board if you know which note your open string is. For example, the low E string. Knowing that E and F are a half step apart, and that a half step is one fret, you can now deduce that playing the first fret of the low E string is an F. The third fret would be a G. The fifth, an A, the seventh, a B, and because B and C are a half step apart, you know that the eighth fret is a C.

How can you apply this to an exercise to help with remembering the natural notes?

Play the natural notes up and down your fret board for each string. At the twelfth fret, the fret board starts over again an octave higher. Thus, I recommend playing the natural notes from the open string to the twelfth fret, and then back. While you play them, sing or say the notes out loud to yourself. Begin to recognize the frets as notes and not as numbers. The third fret of the low E string is a low G, not "the third fret". Doing that will make it a lot easier for you to begin memorizing the notes. As you do the exercise, slowly add more frets (i.e. go past the twelfth fret), but keep playing natural notes (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, no flats or sharps for now). It will become easier as you begin to recognize the twelfth fret as the open strings (just an octave higher.

If you do this exercise every day, you will eventually know all of the natural notes on the fret board, which will make finding sharps and flats a lot easier.

Another good exercise to do is to play octaves. For example, play the low E string. Now play it an octave higher (2nd fret of the D string), and then play it another octave higher. Now another. Once you've located all the octaves available to you, begin finding places on the guitar where you can play those octaves. Start with A, and then work your way to B, C, D, E, F, and then G. Do this exercise alongside the other one, not as an alternative... But this will also help you with finding notes on the fret board, as well as help you understand the locations of octaves.

Once you have a decent understanding of the position of natural notes on your fret board, you can begin finding sharps and flats, which is very easy to do once you know the natural notes.

A sharp is one fret forwards (or a half step forwards).
A flat is one fret backwards (or a half step backwards).

If you play an F on the low E string, i.e. the 1st fret, and you want to find an F#, you will basically play a half step forward. Knowing that a half step is one fret, you will play the 2nd fret. That is an F#.

If you play a G on the low E string, i.e. the 3rd fret, and you want to find Gb, you will play a half step back. Again, knowing a half step is one fret, you'll play the 2nd fret. That is a Gb.

YES, F# and Gb are enharmonic, i.e. they have the same pitch but different names. But that is another lesson altogether, one which I won't delve into now.

I don't have an exercise for finding sharps and flats. The key to finding sharps and flats lies in knowing the natural notes. If you know the natural notes, then you know that the note before and after is the sharp or the flat (except for E, F, B, and C. E and B have no sharp, F and C have no flat).

Hopefully this was some help.

Good luck.

Last edited by Mud Martian at Aug 29, 2007,
#7
Quote by Mud Martian
Natural notes are a whole step apart with the exception of B and C, and E and F, which are a half-step apart. (That said, there is no B# and there is no E#. B# is a C, and E# is an F. I recommend never using the terms B# or E#).


With all due respect, this is a complete fallacy. I'm sure the OP appreciates your help, but posting a false notion like this does nothing but confuse him (and others reading) down the line.
#8
Mud martian is wrong. There are such notes as B# and E#, it just depends what scale you are using, but thats a bit too complicated.
#9
Quote by Johnljones7443
With all due respect, this is a complete fallacy. I'm sure the OP appreciates your help, but posting a false notion like this does nothing but confuse him (and others reading) down the line.


*Shrug* If I'm dealing incorrect information, by all means, correct me. I was simply providing the concept he needs to find the notes on the fretboard. And, to me, telling him that F is an E# and C is a B# is confusing. He should recognize the first fret of the low E string as an F, first and foremost. If he chooses to delve deeper into theory, then he may do so. But I am not a theory god. I'm just good at finding notes on the fret board, and I was attempting to pass that on.