#1
I'm really confused about the British school system. I've grown up in an American school, but I recently moved to England. I'm going to tenth grade (year 10), and I'm really confused about grade 11-12. My school's handbook barely even talks about 12th grade, it only mentions what time they have school. And on Wikipedia it talks about "year 13", but I've seen that nowhere else at school. I'm confused
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#4
You only go to Year 11 on compulsory education.

After that you're allowed to go off and **** your life up if you want to.
R E G G A E
#6
year 12 and 13 arent really called that. Im just starting college and its more like year one again.
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#8
So you're currently in year ten, which makes you 14/15. Next year will be year eleven. When that ends you'll have several options:
-To go to college which is year twelve/thirteen
-To go to Sixth Form which is again year twelve/thirteen (same places, just different names)
-To go to college part time for one or two courses
-Or not continue education at all and get a job

Your form tutor will explain it all to you if you ask.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

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Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#9
Year 7 = Grade 7
Year 8 = Grade 8
Year 9 = ...
Year 10 = ...
Year 11 = ...

Year 9's have year Nine SATs which helps split the students into groups, whether higher or foundation for GCSE. GCSEs are basically a certificate of completion of Secondary School. You take these in year 11 in order to get a place for Higher Education. After year 11 and subsequently, your GCSE, if you pass, you have a choice whether to go to a Sixth Form or a College [for A-levels]. There are the same thing but a college is an institution specifically for A-Level whereas a sixth form is in a secondary school itself [ie. 6th year from year 7, which is the first year].
College or sixth form takes place for two years. In college you say either first year or second year college student. In sixth form, you say, year 12 or year 13. A-Levels are very important as they get you into university or "further education" [what you Americans call College].

A-levels are split into two. The first year is called AS and the second year is called A2. AS grades are added to your A2 grade to form one single grade for each subject that you do. The amount of subjects you take for A-Levels vary but the average is 3. Really clever people take 4 A-levels. After AS, you can choose to drop a subject and keep the remaining 3 or 4. The different between AS and A2 is that the A2's are worth a lot more points.
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Last edited by Harmonius at Aug 29, 2007,
#10
Never mind all that malarkey, the hard fact is you are about to enter the british school system, I escaped a number of years ago but for you who are about to die, I salute you
Diezel, Motherfucker
#11
Quote by Garlik
I'm really confused about the British school system. I've grown up in an American school, but I recently moved to England. I'm going to tenth grade (year 10), and I'm really confused about grade 11-12. My school's handbook barely even talks about 12th grade, it only mentions what time they have school. And on Wikipedia it talks about "year 13", but I've seen that nowhere else at school. I'm confused


As people have said, year 11 is the last year in compulsory education, and then you can go into college or sixth form (years 12-13) if you want to to study AS and A-levels.
Dunno if you know also, but we have things like 5th Year for year 11, and second year for year 8 etc. in regards to secondary school, but that is more of an old thing and not many schools call the year groups like that anymore.
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#13
Quote by Harmonius
Year 7 = Grade 7
Year 8 = Grade 8
Year 9 = ...
Year 10 = ...
Year 11 = ...

Year 9's have year Nine SATs which helps split the students into groups, whether higher or foundation for GCSE. GCSEs are basically a certificate of completion of Secondary School. You take these in year 11 in order to get a place for Higher Education. After year 11 and subsequently, your GCSE, if you pass, you have a choice whether to go to a Sixth Form or a College [for A-levels]. There are the same thing but a college is an institution specifically for A-Level whereas a sixth form is in a secondary school itself [ie. 6th year from year 7, which is the first year].
College or sixth form takes place for two years. In college you say either first year or second year college student. In sixth form, you say, year 12 or year 13. A-Levels are very important as they get you into university or "further education" [what you Americans call College].

A-levels are split into two. The first year is called AS and the second year is called A2. AS grades are added to your A2 grade to form one single grade for each subject that you do. The amount of subjects you take for A-Levels vary but the average is 3. Really clever people take 4 A-levels. After AS, you can choose to drop a subject and keep the remaining 3 or 4. The different between AS and A2 is that the A2's are worth a lot more points.


ERRR...WTF?

I'm English and I start college next week, but not for A-levels. Get your facts right.


KTHXBI
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#14
Quote by AvengedThrice
ERRR...WTF?

I'm English and I start college next week, but not for A-levels. Get your facts right.


KTHXBI

...Harmy's done college, pretty sure he knows what he's talking about.

Most people will do A levels unless you do a BTEC or something like that. Unless you're one of those thick shits who need repeat their GCSEs.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#15
Thanks everybody, it's making a lot more sense. I guess I'll clear up any other questions I have with somebody at my school at some point.
Part of the Conan O'Brien is a genius group.
PM Garlik to join


Quote by X\Chazza/X

Anyway, long hair and a foreign accent, aren't you a hit with the laydeees?

Quote by CollinPlaysBass

Backstreet Boys > Beatles
#16
No there are lots of things to do at college.

GNVQs, A-Levels, BTECs, apprenticeships, etc etc. There are loads of courses.

EDIT: BTW, where in the UK have you moved/are you moving to?
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#17
in the words of ac/dc:

for those about to go into the brittish school system. we salute you.
#18
theres apprenticeships, NVQ's, all that stuff aswell..
EDIT: Calum_Barrow beat me to it..
#20
Quote by Harmonius

The amount of subjects you take for A-Levels vary but the average is 3. Really clever people take 4 A-levels. After AS, you can choose to drop a subject and keep the remaining 3 or 4. The different between AS and A2 is that the A2's are worth a lot more points.


I know people who have done 6 A-levels They're crazy as hell (and smart)
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#21
Ah the Irish system is much easier

High School/Secondary School

1st Year - Usually at 12/13
2nd Year
3rd Year - State Exam-Junior Cert-End of compulsory eduacation
Transition Year- Optional
5th Year
6th Year - State Exam- Leaving Cert- Try and get enough points for your course in college
Last edited by Surfer Rosa at Aug 29, 2007,
#22
Quote by Surfer Rosa
Ah the Irish system is much easier

High School/Secondary School

1st Year - Usually at 12/13
2nd Year
3rd Year - State Exam-Junior Cert-End of compulsory eduacation
Transition Year- Optional
5th Year
6th Year - State Exam- Leaving Cert- Try and get enough points for your course in college

That's very close to the Scottish system, only except 4th year over here is compulsary, and you can choose to leave at the end of that year or stay on for 5th & 6th.
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#24
Quote by Surfer Rosa
Ah the Irish system is much easier

High School/Secondary School

1st Year - Usually at 12/13
2nd Year
3rd Year - State Exam-Junior Cert-End of compulsory eduacation
Transition Year- Optional
5th Year
6th Year - State Exam- Leaving Cert- Try and get enough points for your course in college

wtf, I'm lost!

*falls off of chair*

Cant wait for college next year!
NOPE.