#1
Yeah, I have no idea how. If it's too risky though I'll have it set up by a professional. I just want to know if anybody knows how.
#2
to lower action on an acoustic, i think u have to file the underside of the nut, meaning u would have to get it out somehow. Id see if i could get someone to do it for u, bcuz idk how to do it and doing anything would be potentially bad.
#4
Quote by Guerrilla Radio
Alllrighty then, Looks like i'll be hitting up a guitar tech sometime.

If you do get a tech to do it for you, make sure he explains what hes doing, so you can do it for yourself later.

On my acoustic i when and bought a new saddle. Took my old one out, traced it on to the new one. I then took the new one and shaped it to the old one, then i filed it down in small amounts(the bottom flat part of the saddle). File it a little bit put it back in, played for a day. Then filed it down more if it seemed necessary. Keep your old saddle if you do it yourself just in case you file your new one down to much.

Also, if you don't already have a bone saddle, get one. Its a great upgrade.
epic7734
#5
Quote by qotsa1998
to lower action on an acoustic, i think u have to file the underside of the nut, meaning u would have to get it out somehow. Id see if i could get someone to do it for u, bcuz idk how to do it and doing anything would be potentially bad.



The saddle is only held on by the tension of the guitar strings. Not that hard to pop off at all.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#6
Quote by epic7734
If you do get a tech to do it for you, make sure he explains what hes doing, so you can do it for yourself later.

On my acoustic i when and bought a new saddle. Took my old one out, traced it on to the new one. I then took the new one and shaped it to the old one, then i filed it down in small amounts(the bottom flat part of the saddle). File it a little bit put it back in, played for a day. Then filed it down more if it seemed necessary. Keep your old saddle if you do it yourself just in case you file your new one down to much.

Also, if you don't already have a bone saddle, get one. Its a great upgrade.


It's a very easy thing to do, but please don't use a file, you won't have the control you need to insure that the bottom is precisely flat. Instead, tape a piece of 250 grit sandpaper down to a nice flat surface. My kitchen table worked great. All you need to do then is rub the saddle's bottom surface along the sandpaper, removing small amounts as you go. This provides the control you need. Take it slow and don't take off too much material. Be sure to check the bridge slot that the saddle fits in for debris. You want even contact along the length of the saddle to the bottom of the slot in the bridge.
Agreed on the bone saddle upgrade too. No comparison to Tusq or plastic, even though the makers of Tusq claim it to be superior to true bone.
#7
Quote by qotsa1998
to lower action on an acoustic, i think u have to file the underside of the nut, meaning u would have to get it out somehow. Id see if i could get someone to do it for u, bcuz idk how to do it and doing anything would be potentially bad.

This is often true, but if you are wanting to lower the action, I'd start with the saddle before the nut. The nut is glued into place and you really shouldn't be removing it if you don't know what you're doing. The saddle is the thin white piece (most likely plastic) located on the bridge (near the soundhole, not the headstock). The saddle is simply held in by the strings. When you have the strings off your guitar, you should be able to remove the saddle relatively easily with just your fingers. Once you remove the saddle, you want to do as LeftyDave said. Take some high grit sand paper (I like to use 150) and fix it to a flat surface. Then just glide the saddle with the flat side against the sand paper.

Quote by epic7734
If you do get a tech to do it for you, make sure he explains what hes doing, so you can do it for yourself later.

On my acoustic i when and bought a new saddle. Took my old one out, traced it on to the new one. I then took the new one and shaped it to the old one, then i filed it down in small amounts(the bottom flat part of the saddle). File it a little bit put it back in, played for a day. Then filed it down more if it seemed necessary. Keep your old saddle if you do it yourself just in case you file your new one down to much.

Also, if you don't already have a bone saddle, get one. Its a great upgrade.

Making new adjustments to the saddle on a daily basis can get expensive in terms of replacing strings if you aren't capable of replacing the same set of strings back on the guitar once you take them off. A better way to do this is to measure exactly how much lower you want your action to be. You need a ruler that measures at least 32nds of an inch, but 64ths of an inch is preferable. You place the ruler on top of the 12th fret and see how high the underside of the low E string is from the top of the 12th fret. The most common desired action here is 3/32 of an inch. So see how high yours is and try to adjust it to 3/32. Once you figure out how much you need to lower the action at the twelfth fret, you want to remove twice that amount from the saddle. So take off the strings, pull out the saddle, and make a line with a pencil on the saddle where you want the new bottom to be... measuring from the bottom up. A good way to do this is to take a pencil and your ruler. Make sure your pencil is really sharp. Then hold the pencil in one hand almost flat against a table. Use your ruler to align the point of the pencil with the exact height of the amount you want to remove. Then keep your hand perfectly still and drag the saddle past the pencil point. This should give you a straight line that denotes exactly how much material you want to remove. Once you've got this line in place and are satisfied, start sanding. Make sure to keep constant, even pressure on the entire length of the saddle when you are sanding it. Unless you are a professional and really know what you are doing, you don't want to take more off of one side than the other. It is also very important that you make sure you keep the saddle at a perfect 90 degree angle to the sandpaper. You don't want to sand the underside of the saddle at an angle either! Apply light, even pressure across the length of the saddle as you sand. Once you get all the material removed below your line, slide the saddle back into the bridge and restring the guitar. You should be good to go now!

It is also important to note that before you make action adjustments, you need to check the neck to make sure it is straight. You don't want to go making action adjustments at the saddle if the neck has unnecessary bow in it... you'll probably just end up having to replace the saddle later on when you actually get your neck set correctly. If you don't know how to check the neck, post and ask and myself or someone else will be happy to give you step-by-step directions on making those adjustments.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
It's a very easy thing to do, but please don't use a file

Sorry i should of made myself a little clearer. I'm a carpenter and i have very large files. Ones that would work like the way you explained. I didn't mean a small fingernail file.

Making new adjustments to the saddle on a daily basis can get expensive in terms of replacing strings if you aren't capable of replacing the same set of strings back on the guitar once you take them off.


I like your method, and that will be the way i do it from now on, but i've never had to take the strings off to change a saddle.
epic7734
#9
^-- do you just loosen them a bunch until you can squeeze the saddle out? i've never tried it that way.
#10
Quote by jimtaka
^-- do you just loosen them a bunch until you can squeeze the saddle out? i've never tried it that way.

Yeah, but i don't really have to squeeze it out. Theres normally more than enough give to remove the saddle with little effort. Installing it is just as easy as the removal.
epic7734