#1
So I know a decent piece of theory (some scales, chord theory) and have a pretty good ear for music. However, now what would be a way to practice my solos over a chord progression (a simple one, and not the blues one please).

And also, what theory would help me create melodies (which are ironically simple, yet catchy), rather than chord progressions (I know how to use those already)
#2
find a tape recorder, record yourself playing a chord progression over and over again, and practice soloing over it. or use better recording equipment if you have it. and modes are good to learn
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#3
do what van halen did. just do whatever sounds cool

i mean that guy never had a guitar lesson in his life and look at him...i hardly know how to make riffs or melodies though
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#4
Quote by erasmorpheous
do what van halen did. just do whatever sounds cool

i mean that guy never had a guitar lesson in his life and look at him...i hardly know how to make riffs or melodies though



Van Halen was trained in classical music. He knew what he was doing.
#5
For melodies i think that you should make some lyrics and sound it out from there. either use a guitar or vocals at different times until you have a good idea what they combine into. Using well thought out metaphors in your lyrics really makes the song sound more unique too. Inspiration helps too i guess
#6
As far as the solos go, you just gotta practice. Either with backing tracks, or jamming with your band members.

As far as the melodies go...I'd suggest listening to bands who do what you want to do, and learn how they do it.
#7
Damn, hehe I think i might have a jam tomorrow with the singer and drummer...Probably do or die, cuz im actually the second guitarist, so they technically dont need me, im just supplementing. So I was hoping to play rhythm maybe chord progressions and the lead guitarist can solo over it or create lead riffs kind of like metallica. As for soloing I'm not quite there yet.
#8
I consider melody to be about emotion, tell a story or paint a picture with your solo'ing. Music is an art; if you know 2 boxes worth of a scale you'll be able to make out enough sounds to get a general point across. The rest is just putting different shades of color on the portrait.
Last edited by Krusader187 at Sep 1, 2007,
#9
Run tape when you jam, listen back to it and if you find something that sounds cool, try to recreate it and build something out of it.
#10
use the chris mcdaniel method(thats me).....screw around till you find something that sounds good,and branch off form there
#12
The best advice is to listen to a lot of music, and a lot of different styles of music.
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#13
Quote by LuisWahWah
So I know a decent piece of theory (some scales, chord theory) and have a pretty good ear for music. However, now what would be a way to practice my solos over a chord progression (a simple one, and not the blues one please).

And also, what theory would help me create melodies (which are ironically simple, yet catchy), rather than chord progressions (I know how to use those already)


To learn how to write melodies: Listen to, learn, and study melodies that you like.
Then get creative... use your own ear, and own brain and create something that sounds good to you. (only you know what you want. We cant tell you a thoery for finding a melody that sounds good to YOU)

to practice soloing over a chord progression.... make or get some backing tracks and practice soloing over them
shred is gaudy music