#1
As stated in the title, i read that putting medium-heavy gauge strings on cheap acoustic (<300$) can snap the neck or pull off the bridge. And even if is stay in one piece, the tuning will be crap. How much of this is true?
I'm ordered a cheap acoustic (http://www.music123.com/Jasmine-by-Takamine-S34C-NEX-Cutaway-Acoustic-Guitar-516458-i1148992.Music123)
and i want to know what string's gauge will be safe to put on it. Thanks in advance.
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#2
Lights will be fine for it .012-.054 gauge. These are about the most common gauge for an acoustic guitar. D'Addario EXP's or Elixers are what I'd go with. The coating on them make for a more forgiving string if you're a beginner.
#3
Its untrue that the strings could snap your neck becuz anything to do with breaking a guitar is usually purely becuz of a) the way u treat the guitar or b) sudden weather changes which casuse the wood to snap.

The tuning if you put say .9 strings especially nickel wound strings, will make the tuning crappy and if the strings DO happen to stay there the sound would suck as compared to if u put say .12 bronze strings. Also the bronze strings make your fingers stronger so if your a beginner theyre the best way to go.
#4
I have played classical guitar and electric (more electric than classical) for like 4 years, but just played a few times an acoustic steel string guitar. So, the 0.12-0.54 gauge will be the way to go?
I'm looking to do some bendings too, because i'm learning improvisation stuff and i would like to apply it to the acoustic guitar too.
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

Gear:
Kramer Striker FR422SM
Roland Microcube
Digitech Bad Monkey
Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm picks


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#6
I've never heard of heavy gauge strings causing anything to actually break on a guitar. I suspect that it just isn't true. You will be fine putting medium gauge strings on your guitar. If you are really interested in doing alot of bends, you might want to go with light gauge strings. I'd recommend light gauge Elixirs for the style you are going for.
#7
^you are correct.

Heavy strings will warp the neck over 10 or 20 years, but it's just as likely to happen on an expensive guitar as it is on a cheap guitar. Most guitars are made with the idea that you will use 12's but it's usually safe to go up or down a size.
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#8
lol, where did u read that, cause i posted something along those lines because a guy in the guitar shop told me so, which i was told was rubbish (think he had a big batch of lights that he needed to sell), i use light strings now anyway which are easier to press down and are much more versatile for bending and the like, i think they sound better too.
#9
^it's not rubbish at all. Start checking product manuals and you will see that the majority of guitar makers design their guitars with lights in mind.
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#11
Meh, there was an old 12 gauge of my moms that had too heavy of gauge, and it completely warped the whole guitar, which is now mostly worthless. My cheap acoustic (regent, by alvarez) now has 10's on it, the higher gauge strings gave it some funky sounds and action on the higher notes. 10s make it easier to play and sound better, IMHO.
#12
What are the advantages with heavy strings and what are the advantages with light strings?
#13
Depents on whether you have a good or a bad cheap guitar. A bad cheap guitar may suffer from manufacturing flaws that causes malfunctions like bridges peeling off, bracings breaking or disattaching or even complete tops coming loose. If you think your guitar is that bad, lighter gauche strings may help to postpone its untimely demise a little bit, but not by much.
A good cheap guitar, on the other hand, can actually be stronger than an expensive one and will more readily take abuse and overloads. That is because delicate, sound improving features like minimalized scalopped brazing and extremely tapered tops are very labour intensive. Doing away with them cuts manufacturing costs dramatically, and by coincidence makes the guitar more sturdy.
I know these Jasmines to be very good cheap guitars that don't come apart just like that. In fact they're that good that you probably don't need high tension strings at all to extract a nice sound from them.
#14
Quote by dannyyy
What are the advantages with heavy strings and what are the advantages with light strings?


The easy answer is that light strings are easier to bend and heavy strings give a fuller sound.

Unfortunatly the easy answer isn't always the right answer. The trick is to find the right string gauge for you guitar. If you are using strings that are too light for your guitar it will sound tight and thin.
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#15
Quote by rijker
lol, where did u read that, cause i posted something along those lines because a guy in the guitar shop told me so, which i was told was rubbish (think he had a big batch of lights that he needed to sell), i use light strings now anyway which are easier to press down and are much more versatile for bending and the like, i think they sound better too.


I read it on the harmony central forum.
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

Gear:
Kramer Striker FR422SM
Roland Microcube
Digitech Bad Monkey
Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm picks


MY VIDEOS
#16
I use D'Addario J-40 silk and steel strings. They ring very nicely due to the silk core and they bend very well, too. The tone I get from them is sharp if picking and sweet if strumming. They're only about $13 a set. Oh and you can get a real nice slide top to bottom without losing the resonance.