#1
Well I was wondering what theory I should learn to make my playing better. I know a bunch of scales, and know how to make a chord progression(although I never do), I know the notes up the neck. What else can I learn?
#2
Memorize your intervals and work on some basic ear training.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#3
intervals indeed. practice stuff like harmonizing. play the root note, then practice it a 3rd,5th,7th,8th higher or lower. also can you read standard notation? sight reading always helps. try learning different chords too..there are so many interesting chords out there...like "add","sus"7ths...stuff like that.
#4
Quote by SixStringSavior
intervals indeed. practice stuff like harmonizing. play the root note, then practice it a 3rd,5th,7th,8th higher or lower. also can you read standard notation? sight reading always helps. try learning different chords too..there are so many interesting chords out there...like "add","sus"7ths...stuff like that.

I'm just not a big fan of non-power chords although I do use some barre chords and a lot of sus chords. I think i'll start working on intervals next. And i was thinking about harmonizing with me playing one thing and another guitarist playing the same thing one octave lower, how does harmonizing an octave apart sound?
#5
Quote by SOAD_freak777
how does harmonizing an octave apart sound?



It sounds about as exciting as playing power chords only. Harmonize in thirds or sixths.
#6
Quote by kyrreca
It sounds about as exciting as playing power chords only. Harmonize in thirds or sixths.

i agree. harmonizing an octave apart all the time just sounds like your playing root octave powerchords..gets kind of boring. thought of one more thing too..practice some double stops as well.
hmm..PM if you'd like more ideas.
#7
Quote by SOAD_freak777
I'm just not a big fan of non-power chords although I do use some barre chords and a lot of sus chords. I think i'll start working on intervals next. And i was thinking about harmonizing with me playing one thing and another guitarist playing the same thing one octave lower, how does harmonizing an octave apart sound?

Empty and lame unless you have a third instrument evening things out, like the extra rhythm guitar at the end of Bridge of Destiny by Arch Enemy. Avoid using octaves, 4ths, and 5ths for harmonies that last for more than maybe two beats, it gets boring pretty fast. It works in a context like the second to last riff of Fade to Black where they descend on the D and G strings, but you don't want a whole song around that kind of ideas. Once you understand your intervals, look into stuff like JJ Fux to understand the klassic rules of voice leading. Trust me, it is relevant to modern music even if you don't see it at first.

Telling us the kind of music you listen to will help too, because some concepts are just more important to certain genres.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.