#1
hey im not sure if i am total right but i think i might be tone deaf. I have been playing guitar for about 6 months now and i cant tune my guitar by ear at all. other people pick up my guitar and play it and cring at how badly it is out of tune. I can differentiate between notes and scales, but i cant tell when my guitar is out of tune. idk if i am tone deaf or if its just i havent been playing long enough to develope an ear for music, and i havent had any sort of musical training, i have just be teaching myself for the most part.
Last edited by gibsonboy3 at Aug 31, 2007,
#2
Use a tuner? so what if youre tone deaf... you still have technology.


Oh, that and um... I always tune in D Standard... which is 2 steps lower than standard... and anytime someone picks up my guitar, theyre like "ew, its like, REALLY out of tune".

It's just cause my guitar is tuned lower.... not out of tune........


Another thing! is that you might not have been playing long enough to tell the low E from an Eb. So, just don't worry about it, it'll come naturally and if it doesn't... technology!
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#4
Try tuning it with an electronic tuner as perfectly as you can and then see if you notice a difference.
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#5
i couldn't tune by ear till like... a year after i started. it's like that.
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#7
Its kind of odd, but i hear stings that are in tune has less "vibration" in it. Thats really the only way that I can tune by ear. Checked with a tuner and I was damn close so try it out with amp on clean. Hope that helps, but it probably wont as everyone has their own way of tuning by ear eventually.
#8
Try plunking out an A440 on a piano till you get the ear for it. It'll help if you pound it in your brain.
#9
Quote by IclaptonisgodI
ur not tone death u just need to learn to develope an ear for music


Tone death? Are you stupid?
#10
I was that way when I started to play guitar for the first couple months, after you tune you guitar play a scale or chord, something fimilar. It WILL sound weird if it isn't the tune you typically play in. TUNE OFTEN!
#11
I worked in a guitar store for 11 months, tuning guitars everyday really helped me out. but I could already kind of tune at that time. if you know the 5th fret method, try doing it with distortion it helps some people.
#12
hmm well heres what i suggest. I developed an ear for tuning my guitar when i first started playing. being tone def isnt horrible but it can hinder your plying. Its probably due to you just have developed a ear for it yet. here are some tips that might help:

1. take up singing or get into choir. this will really help, it wil elp you learn what tones are correct and as well help you with pitch, and you will be able to produce a specific sound of that note in your mind.

2. like the guy up there said. technology is wonderful, get a tuner, and tune your guitar everytime you get ready to play. playing in tune will help you recognize how bad it sounds when its not in tune. another thing added to that, when im bored i strum my guitar up and down, htis maybe helped e recogniz the pitch and tone

3. perhaps memorizing the how the notes sound. play the notes in the right key on a piano or such, then sing (or scream for all I care) that note in that pitch, do them in order and memorize how they sound.

other then that just keep playing and I'm sure you'll learn it sooner or later.

Good lcuk.
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#13
Quote by gibsonboy3
hey im not sure if i am total right but i think i might be tone deaf. I have been playing guitar for about 6 months now and i cant tune my guitar by ear at all. other people pick up my guitar and play it and cring at how badly it is out of tune. I can differentiate between notes and scales and im getting good at telling what key and mode a song is in, but i cant tell when my guitar is out of tune. idk if i am tone deaf or if its just i havent been playing long enough to develope an ear for music, and i havent had any sort of musical training, i have just be teaching myself for the most part.


Tone deafness is extremely rare. Your ear just isn't developed yet.
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#14
so?? roger waters has other people tune his stuff n hes been playing (bass) for like 30 years now
#15
You've just gotta learn what to listen to. Here's what you should try:
Put on some distortion, this makes it easier to hear what you wanna hear.
- Play the open 6th string, and let it ring
- Simultaniously play 5th string, 6th fret. This is an Eb so it will sound horrible
- Slowly bend the 5th string (down), you're bending the Eb to an E, an octave (this is 'in tune')
-You should listen to a "wah wah wah" kinda sound that gets slower and slower when you come closer to the octave. When you're in perfect octave the sound stops. This is the sound you should listen to when tuning strings (but it's weaker when you don't have distortion)
#16
Thats not tone death. tone death people wouldnt be able to tell the difference between the notes in a scale. you dont have perfect pitch. its not a neccesity. just use guitar tuners, and work on your relative pitch. as far as im aware perfect pitch isnt something that can be learnt, or not without great difficulty.
#17
Quote by gibsonboy3
hey im not sure if i am total right but i think i might be tone deaf. I have been playing guitar for about 6 months now and i cant tune my guitar by ear at all. other people pick up my guitar and play it and cring at how badly it is out of tune. I can differentiate between notes and scales, but i cant tell when my guitar is out of tune. idk if i am tone deaf or if its just i havent been playing long enough to develope an ear for music, and i havent had any sort of musical training, i have just be teaching myself for the most part.


if you were tone deaf you would speak in mono tone, do you?
#18
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Tone deafness is extremely rare. Your ear just isn't developed yet.


+1
Less than 2% of the population is tone-deaf, although 15% say they are . . .
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#19
Claiming tone death is a lazy way of not learning to relate notes to sounds. If you can hear the difference in scales, you have pretty much answered your own question.
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#20
It seems the answer is simple, perhaps. You've been playing out of tune and not taking the time to tune it with a tuner, so you don't know what "right" is. You don't know what in tune sounds like so you dont know you are out of tune! Tune many times during your guitar sessions to make sure you are in tune. Then, after a while, when the guitar is out of tune you will say "hey, that's not how it normally sounds" .
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#21
At 6 months i couldn't either. Now if i pick up my guitar i can tell if it's out of tune, but i cant put it IN tune by ear.
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#22
its ****ing DEAF! with and F!!! not death...that has been around all my life..its not hard..its deaf!
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#24
As said, truly tone deaf people always speak in a monotone and they literally can't hear the difference between notes. You just don't know what to listen for when tuning. If you play the same note on different strings and it's out of tune, you'll hear 'waves.' The slower they are the more in tune you are.

And to the guy above me, that just means you haven't worked on developing your singing voice.
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#26
Quote by Ryioku


Oh, that and um... I always tune in D Standard... which is 2 steps lower than standard...


not to be a picky bastard, but D standard is one step lower

as for the tone deaf problem, just get a tuner and use it EVERYTIME you pick up your guitar to make sure its in tune. do this for the next 5 or 6 months then start intermittently picking it up and playing for a second to see if it sounds right, then check yourself with a tuner. this is what i did it helped immensely (as an addendum, after about a year and a half or 2 years i could EASILY tell if a string was out of tune and which one it was and also if it was sharp or flat)

edit: and yes Roger Waters does have people still tune his instruments to this day but thats because he's ROGER F#CKING WATERS!!!! that is all
#27
Quote by af_the_fragile
Try this out and find out for yourself how good or bad you are...!

http://jakemandell.com/tonedeaf/


i did that but it didnt give me a score?

EDIT:

oh i see it i got 9 wrong!
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Last edited by ShaunFrusciante at Sep 2, 2007,
#28
Quote by Zoso92
so?? roger waters has other people tune his stuff n hes been playing (bass) for like 30 years now


First off, Pink Floyd's first album came out 40 years ago, so he's been playing for over 40, not "like 30."

Secondly, I'm sure that Roger Waters is completely able to tune his basses. He has his guitar techs do it at shows, but I doubt he grabs his cell phone and has someone come over to his house to tune them for him when he wants to play.

Honestly, people.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


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#30
Quote by sidereal9
if i was roger waters i would call people to come tune mine

Good thing you're not roger waters.

And I don't think that test is accurate, it says I'm tone deaf even though I'm obviously not.
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Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


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#31
Quote by Ryioku

Oh, that and um... I always tune in D Standard... which is 2 steps lower than standard... and anytime someone picks up my guitar, theyre like "ew, its like, REALLY out of tune".


It shouldn't sound out of tune at all, playing something on it should sound fine to anyone... Either they couldn't play or your guitar is actaully just badly tuned

Id say practice, once you've tuned your low E with a tuner, tune the rest by ear, see how close you get to the real notes...

BTW whats all this 'tone death' stuff?
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Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




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#32
If a guitar is tuned to standard D, or 1/4 step down or whatever, although "in tune" to itself, if someone picked it up to play it, it is highly likely that the *initial* reaction would be to think the guitar is out of tune. If you strum an open E chord shape and it actually sounds like a D (for the example of standard D tuning) it would sound flat - it would take someone with a very good ear to pick that rather than being "out of tune" that it was just tuned lower. Having said that, any reasonably trained ear should be able to pick fairly quickly that it is in tune, but not standard E.

This is probably redundant to explain outside of the tuning thread, but the best way to train your ear to know when two notes are in tune, is to listen to the "beat frequency". This is a phenomenon of waves, in this case, sound waves; when two notes are played together, their two individual frequencies "overlap" or blend - if the peak of one wave and a trough of another reach your ear at the same time, they cancel one another and you hear nothing. If two waveform peaks hit your ear at once, it is twice as loud. If you are tuning two guitar strings and they are "close" in pitch, i.e. within a half step or so, the two freqencies will "interfere" with one another and you will hear a low freqency "pulse" which is basically the resultant wave from the two "almost in tune" pitches.

The beat frequency indicates to you how far out of tune the two notes are - fast pulsing means the notes are far apart and slow pulsing is closer to in tune. Determining whether the strings are in tune is just a matter of slowing the pulses down as much as possible. You might be able to slow them to about one beat every 3 or 4 seconds, maybe better, depending on the quality of your machine heads - and numerous other factors. You will find, though, that you will hear beats slow down as you get closer to tuned, but at some point, even very slight adjustments will cause the beats to speed up again, going out of tune in the other direction. It is virtually impossible to completely eliminate the beat frequency, although subtle variations in how you fret notes and intonation factors will significantly outweigh a tuning variance of a fraction of 1Hz (0.2Hz difference would be one beat every 5 seconds).

Even digital tuners will not get your guitar in as good tune as using your ear. How often do you tune up on an electronic tuner and "settle" for getting an individual string within the last graduation on the scale? Then maybe you get the next string by the same margin, but on the sharp side instead of the flat side. Your audience doesn't hold out a digital tuner to gauge how much they like your music, they use their ears... why not use your's?