#1
hey guys. could someone give me an idea on the differences between these two guitars and what type of music suits them. thanks
#3
Strats are well made guitars,and the three single coils are good for primarily blues, and clean, with a little distortion every now and then, hence people like eric clapton use them.
Les Pauls are dual humbucker guitars and are good for harder and heavy rock metal.
les pauls are neckthru guitars and hence have more sustain.
Epiphone Dot-335
Fender USA Tele
'82 30th anniversary Les Paul goldtop
1965 pre-CBS Fender Jaguar

Crybaby
TS-9
turbo rat
Ge-7
+many more

Fender Twin Reverb
King's Full-tube 100 watt half stack. - £300
#4
Quote by Hdap101
Strats are well made guitars,and the three single coils are good for primarily blues, and clean, with a little distortion every now and then, hence people like eric clapton use them.
Les Pauls are dual humbucker guitars and are good for harder and heavy rock metal.
les pauls are neckthru guitars and hence have more sustain.



*Set-neck(The body of an Epiphone/Gibson Les paul is too thick take be neck thru, the neck joint would be awkward)


and to TS, the most versatile guitar you could get is a Strat with the H/S/S configuration. But I, personally like neither of them.
Last edited by GuitarHero0715 at Sep 1, 2007,
#5
Quote by Hdap101
neckthru guitars and hence have more sustain.

It's Mostly Set-neck as far as i know... Correct me if i'm wrong.
#6
play both...find out what YOU like...make a choice from there...i've seen blues guys play LP's and metal guys play strats ("one" by metallica was recorded on a strat)....so its all what feels good to you
#7
strats:
more "twangy" sound
more comfortable to play
weigh less
3 pickups, good for blues
whammy bar
incredibly easy to maintain/repair

les pauls:
warmer tone
2 humbuckers
set neck, more sustain
better for heavier sounds

for me, i'd take a strat, i'm going to get one eventually one day, they have far more advantages than a les paul does, but a les paul is great too, depends what you want.
#9
h/s/s means humbucker in the bridge position on a strat instead of a single coil.

imo, sustain really doesn't mean that much, how often are you going to want to sustain a note longer than 3-4 seconds? almost any guitar can do that.
#10
my apologies on the mis-information
Epiphone Dot-335
Fender USA Tele
'82 30th anniversary Les Paul goldtop
1965 pre-CBS Fender Jaguar

Crybaby
TS-9
turbo rat
Ge-7
+many more

Fender Twin Reverb
King's Full-tube 100 watt half stack. - £300
#11
Telcaster + Les paul = Strat

Thats to my taste, play them all otherwise youll never know what you like
#12
Quote by rtman26
play both...find out what YOU like...make a choice from there...i've seen blues guys play LP's and metal guys play strats ("one" by metallica was recorded on a strat)....so its all what feels good to you

this is right on the $$$$$$
#13
I own both a Les Paul and Strat.

Strats are made out of alder (or sometimes ash), which is a light wood with good attack and a bit bright tone. Les Pauls are made out of mahogany with a thich maple top. Mahogany is a wood with very dark and thich tone, but maple is VERY bright, so the maple top adds some attack and top end. Strats have a bolt on neck, while Les Pauls have a set neck. Set necks give you better sustain in many cases, but the good thing with a Strat neck is that it's easy to replace and I find Fender necks a bit more easy to play. A Strat neck is also (often) a bit thinner than a Les Paul one. When it comes to pickups, it varies a lot, but Fenders mostly come with single coils. They are quite twangy and are great with cleans up to crunch. Good example of what they sound like are some RHCP and SRV. Les Pauls mostly comes with humbuckers and most of the time medium output ones. They have a much fatter and warmer tone. Good example of classic Gibson humbuckers are AC/DC, Cream and ZZ Top.

It depends on what music you play and what sounds you want. I myself like to vary between a Strat and Les Paul, to get different sounds.
Quote by stratman_13
It's okay Gabel. You kick ass.



18watter video demo

My band

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2009
#14
Strats have a thinner tinty sound to them
One thing I didnt like about my strat was if I hit a low string open like an A or an E and let them ride and then bend a note on the G string the E or A string would kind of bend with the G string.

Try it if you own a strat.
Go to this page to hear my original song recordings

Click Here
#15
i think you should go with a les paul over a strat but if you like the shape of a strat and the whammy use a gibson SG with a bigsby vibrato you get the easy acess of the strat and the sound of a les paul
#16
Quote by Gabel
I own both a Les Paul and Strat.

Strats are made out of alder (or sometimes ash), which is a light wood with good attack and a bit bright tone. Les Pauls are made out of mahogany with a thich maple top. Mahogany is a wood with very dark and thich tone, but maple is VERY bright, so the maple top adds some attack and top end. Strats have a bolt on neck, while Les Pauls have a set neck. Set necks give you better sustain in many cases, but the good thing with a Strat neck is that it's easy to replace and I find Fender necks a bit more easy to play. A Strat neck is also (often) a bit thinner than a Les Paul one. When it comes to pickups, it varies a lot, but Fenders mostly come with single coils. They are quite twangy and are great with cleans up to crunch. Good example of what they sound like are some RHCP and SRV. Les Pauls mostly comes with humbuckers and most of the time medium output ones. They have a much fatter and warmer tone. Good example of classic Gibson humbuckers are AC/DC, Cream and ZZ Top.

It depends on what music you play and what sounds you want. I myself like to vary between a Strat and Les Paul, to get different sounds.

+2

Also, after auditioning both through a decent tube amp you can afford (assuming you have a basic SS amp), plan to buy the amp with your guitar.

#17
Quote by Gabel
I own both a Les Paul and Strat.

Strats are made out of alder (or sometimes ash), which is a light wood with good attack and a bit bright tone. Les Pauls are made out of mahogany with a thich maple top. Mahogany is a wood with very dark and thich tone, but maple is VERY bright, so the maple top adds some attack and top end. Strats have a bolt on neck, while Les Pauls have a set neck. Set necks give you better sustain in many cases, but the good thing with a Strat neck is that it's easy to replace and I find Fender necks a bit more easy to play. A Strat neck is also (often) a bit thinner than a Les Paul one. When it comes to pickups, it varies a lot, but Fenders mostly come with single coils. They are quite twangy and are great with cleans up to crunch. Good example of what they sound like are some RHCP and SRV. Les Pauls mostly comes with humbuckers and most of the time medium output ones. They have a much fatter and warmer tone. Good example of classic Gibson humbuckers are AC/DC, Cream and ZZ Top.

It depends on what music you play and what sounds you want. I myself like to vary between a Strat and Les Paul, to get different sounds.

+3

And then remember the Strat has a tremolo and the LP has a hardtail, which loses the Strat a bit of sustain and a bit of tone unless it's blocked down.

You can't really compare the two. They're completely different beasts. Saying "My LP pwns your Strat" is like saying "My air freshener is better than your doormat" (not being derogatory to either brand...).
The Laney Thread are big and clever. No exceptions.
#18
Strat: Can do almost anything except heavy distortion. Thin necks for easy full bends. Trem for cool vibrato. Warm as heck neck pickup for good chords and jazzish style stuff. Used by lots of 60's bands (hendrix, Pink Floyd to name a few). Also used by Blues Legend Eric Clapton and SRV. Used by Malmsteen as well. Iron Maiden used them with Mini-buckers. Good for indie stuff, but not much more distortion than that.

Les Paul: Can do lots of styles, including heavy rock and metal. Not good for country. Great for blues and the like. Very warm neck pickup is good for chording and (was made originally for ) jazz. No trems, but have mahogany necks, so u can add stuff with those. Necks are usually thicker than Strat necks, and set or glued-in for better sustain. Much heavier than Strats, but with the weight comes more sustain and a darker tone. Some have P-90 single-coils, or mini-humbuckers as well as traditional full-sized humbuckers. Used by such greats as Slash, as well as many other artists.

there is so much variety between the two, they can be hard to compare. I say try the two and see which u like more.
#19
This is a pretty pointless thread - the Strat and the Les Paul are pretty much polar oppposites and there's a wealth of information available on the net detailing the differences between them and their respective histories.

Both are fantastic guitar designs and both excel at certain things, but ultimately there's little that's common to either save for the basics of being made of wood and having strings.

TS, you'd be far better off doing some research of your own rather than asking for opinons here...the question you've asked is too vague to have a specific answer.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com