#1

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, judging from this pic, would have been one heck of a tourist spot if it still exists today. From what i can remember of our Asian Studies lesson a week ago, it was a gift of some emperor to his wife, because she wasn't used to live in a place without trees.
But there's something I'd like to point out here, that's maybe have always been ignored with pictures and ideas synonymous to the Gardens: THERE'S A FOUNTAIN!

For the record in order for a fountain to circulate the water up and down it, it needs a pump (as far as I know). A pump needs electricity to work. There's no electricity back in the Mesopotamian times.
This isn't the only incident wherein fountains appeared at a time before electricty. I used to think that the medieval times normally had fountains (thanks to Disney Movies.) I'm sure most of you had thought the same.
Now, I know this is only a drawing, but I'm positive that the artist had tried his best to make it as accurate as possible. So any thoughts on the topic?
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#2
The Romans had fountains as well...
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Wat.
#4
they didnt need electricity,
remember, that during this age, they began to get a good understanding of hydraulics, and with hydraulics, you could push up the water using the water thats falling down, to create a never endeing flow using no electrcty
#5
/slaps forehead

Oh, the stupidity.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#6
You are wrong, I am afraid. Water will automatically be pumped if it's released from a source located on higher ground that the pipe where the water will flow out from. If you put a lake or a water tower on a high hill and drag a hose from there to a fountain/toilet/whatever water will flow through the hose and out of the other object without a pump.
#7

That is also one of the ancient wonders of the world. I've always seen that as a load of crap Although that would be pretty awesome if that was real.

edit: And yeah I've seen pumps still today without electricity.
#8
they didnt need electricity,
remember, that during this age, they began to get a good understanding of hydraulics, and with hydraulics, you could push up the water using the water thats falling down, to create a never endeing flow using no electrcty

It's called gravity. You can use it to drive pumps, too

How exactly? How could gravity help drive water up?!

You win at life for spotting that.

But yeah, you're right.


Yeah thanks!
Quote by DrkNTwstd
darkangel, you are a smart man. no flame shield is necessary.


Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore"
#9
Quote by Renka
You are wrong, I am afraid. Water will automatically be pumped if it's released from a source located on higher ground that the pipe where the water will flow out from. If you put a lake or a water tower on a high hill and drag a hose from there to a fountain/toilet/whatever water will flow through the hose and out of the other object without a pump.



Yup, its how i drain water from my large fishtank when it needs a partial water change.
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wtf? why didnt you punch one of them in the face or something? they're not girls, they are fat chavs, they are their own gender
#10
Quote by Renka
You are wrong, I am afraid. Water will automatically be pumped if it's released from a source located on higher ground that the pipe where the water will flow out from. If you put a lake or a water tower on a high hill and drag a hose from there to a fountain/toilet/whatever water will flow through the hose and out of the other object without a pump.


oh.... awwww...

case closed then
Quote by DrkNTwstd
darkangel, you are a smart man. no flame shield is necessary.


Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore"
#12
Quote by wiggyisgreat

That is also one of the ancient wonders of the world. I've always seen that as a load of crap Although that would be pretty awesome if that was real.

edit: And yeah I've seen pumps still today without electricity.


+111322132
Well all of them would have been sweet if they still exist today.... the current ones suck....
Quote by DrkNTwstd
darkangel, you are a smart man. no flame shield is necessary.


Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore"
#13
The Hanging Gardens of Babylon (also known as Hanging Gardens of Semiramis) and the walls of Babylon (near present-day Al Hillah in Iraq) are considered one of the original Seven Wonders of the World. They were built by Nebuchadnezzar II around 600 BC. He is reported to have constructed the gardens to please his wife, Amytis of Media, who longed for the trees and beautiful plants of her homeland. They were destroyed in an earthquake after the 1st century BC.

The lush Hanging Gardens are extensively documented by Greek historians such as Strabo and Diodorus Siculus. Through the ages, the location may have been confused with gardens that existed at Nineveh, whose king at the time was Nimrod, since tablets from there clearly show gardens. Writings on these tablets describe the possible use of something similar to an Archimedes' screw as a process of raising the water to the required height.


Greek References

The Greek Historian

"Babylon, too, lies in a plain; and the circuit of its wall is three hundred and eighty-five stadia. The thickness of its wall is thirty-two feet; the height thereof between the towers is fifty cubits; that of the towers is sixty cubits; and the passage on top of the wall is such that four-horse chariots can easily pass one another; and it is on this account that this and the hanging garden are called one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The garden is quadrangular in shape, and each side is four plethra in length. It consists of arched vaults, which are situated, one after another, on checkered, cube-like foundations. The checkered foundations, which are hollowed out, are covered so deep with earth that they admit of the largest of trees, having been constructed of baked brick and asphalt — the foundations themselves and the vaults and the arches. The ascent to the uppermost terrace-roofs is made by a stairway; and alongside these stairs there were screws, through which the water was continually conducted up into the garden from the Euphrates by those appointed for this purpose. For the river, a stadium in width, flows through the middle of the city; and the garden is on the bank of the river."

The Greek Historian Diodorus:

"The Garden was 100 feet long by 100 wide and built up in tiers so that it resembled a theater. Vaults had been constructed under the ascending terraces which carried the entire weight of the planted garden; the uppermost vault, which was seventy-five feet high, was the highest part of the garden, which, at this point, was on the same level as the city walls. The roofs of the vaults which supported the garden were constructed of stone beams some sixteen feet long, and over these were laid first a layer of reeds set in thick tar, then two courses of baked brick bonded by cement, and finally a covering of lead to prevent the moisture in the soil penetrating the roof. On top of this roof enough topsoil was heaped to allow the biggest trees to take root. The earth was leveled off and thickly planted with every kind of tree. And since the galleries projected one beyond the other, where they were sunlit, they contained conduits for the water which was raised by pumps in great abundance from the river, though no one outside could see it being done."

Other References

Scriptores Rerum Alexandrii Magni

"And then there were the Hanging Gardens. Paracleisos going up to the top is like climbing a mountain. Each terrace rises up from the last like the syrinx, the pipes of pan, which are made of several tubes of unequal length. This gives the appearance of a theater. It was flanked by perfectly constructed walls twenty-five feet thick. The galleries were roofed with stone balconies. Above these there was the first of a bed of reeds with a great quantity of bitumen, then a double layer of baked bricks set in gypsum, then over that a covering of lead so that moisture from the soil heaped above it would not seep through. The earth was deep enough to contain the roots of the many varieties of trees which fascinated the beholder with their great size and their beauty. There was also a passage which had pipes leading up to the highest level and machinery for raising water through which great quantities of water were drawn from the river, with none of the process being visible from the outside."

Did They Exist?

There is some controversy as to whether the Hanging Gardens were an actual creation or a poetic creation due to the lack of documentation of them in the chronicles of Babylonian history. In ancient writings the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were first described by Berossus, a Chaldean priest who lived in the late 4th century B.C. These accounts were later elaborated on by Greek historians.

Recent archaeological excavations of the palace in Iraq have uncovered evidence of a building with vaults and a well nearby. However, the location of the palace complex contradicts where Greek historians placed the Hanging Gardens, which was on the banks of the Euphrates River.

However, recently there have been excavations on the banks of the Euphrates River of some substantial 25 meter-thick walls. Also, excavations have shown that there may be some seeds scattered around this area.
Last edited by BDR_23 at Sep 1, 2007,
#15
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Do you want me to take you through every step?
get a basic understanding of hydraulics and dont post threads until you do some research


No don't. I've already found out the answer.
Quote by DrkNTwstd
darkangel, you are a smart man. no flame shield is necessary.


Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore"
#16
Quote by wiggyisgreat

That is also one of the ancient wonders of the world. I've always seen that as a load of crap Although that would be pretty awesome if that was real.

edit: And yeah I've seen pumps still today without electricity.


That was real. It was called the Collossus at Rhodes but was destroyed by invaders or something like that. That would have been f*cking awesome if it had survived


The ancients used water pressure and gravity to make them. Too bad the Gardens are long gone (so is basically every other Wonder of the World besides the Pyramids)
#17
Quote by wiggyisgreat

That is also one of the ancient wonders of the world. I've always seen that as a load of crap Although that would be pretty awesome if that was real.

edit: And yeah I've seen pumps still today without electricity.

Sorry, the Colossus of Rhodes was real. It wasn't quite in that position, it would have been to heavy to be supported like that, it was more on one side of the port, if I remember correctly. Eventually it broke and went into the harbour. The wonders of the ancient world aren't just stories, y'know.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#19
Quote by wiggyisgreat

That is also one of the ancient wonders of the world. I've always seen that as a load of crap Although that would be pretty awesome if that was real.

edit: And yeah I've seen pumps still today without electricity.


It wasn't that big, it was slightly smaller than the Statue of Liberty if I remember. IT was made out of bronze of the weapons the enemies left behind when they retreated, and historians think that it didn't have its legs open like that, it was more of a side statue.
#21
Quote by Alexander_BR
It wasn't that big, it was slightly smaller than the Statue of Liberty if I remember. IT was made out of bronze of the weapons the enemies left behind when they retreated, and historians think that it didn't have its legs open like that, it was more of a side statue.



i think it was 3/4 the size of the SOL
#22
Quote by Alexander_BR
It wasn't that big, it was slightly smaller than the Statue of Liberty if I remember. IT was made out of bronze of the weapons the enemies left behind when they retreated, and historians think that it didn't have its legs open like that, it was more of a side statue.

I think i read somewhere it's(surprise surprise) not solid bronze either - acyually soprt of like a modern tall building, it would have been built by hanging the bronze plates on a frame(although the frame would still not really have been strong enough to make it as big as some reports say).
#23
lol, i've never thought of that
I put a dollar in a change machine. Nothing changed.
#24
Interesting excerpt from Wiki

Diodorus described multi-levelled gardens reaching 22 metres (75 feet) high, complete with machinery for circulating water. Large trees grew on the roof.

( For Garden )
#25
^I'm pretty sure it was real. How it was destroyed exactly I don't remember but it did exist and it was a huge mother. It wasn't entirely solid (it used a sort-of bronze "cast" over a"skeleton" type thing) Most artist-renditions have it in that position (legs open, arm up) but this pic is from the back so it looks a little off
Last edited by thewho65 at Sep 1, 2007,
#26
Quote by Nirvana_RATM2
Interesting excerpt from Wiki

Diodorus described multi-levelled gardens reaching 22 metres (75 feet) high, complete with machinery for circulating water. Large trees grew on the roof.

( For Garden )

An Archimedes screw would have worked for that, just not sure if it had been invented then.
#27
Quote by darkangel24

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, judging from this pic, would have been one heck of a tourist spot if it still exists today. From what i can remember of our Asian Studies lesson a week ago, it was a gift of some emperor to his wife, because she wasn't used to live in a place without trees.
But there's something I'd like to point out here, that's maybe have always been ignored with pictures and ideas synonymous to the Gardens: THERE'S A FOUNTAIN!

For the record in order for a fountain to circulate the water up and down it, it needs a pump (as far as I know). A pump needs electricity to work. There's no electricity back in the Mesopotamian times.
This isn't the only incident wherein fountains appeared at a time before electricty. I used to think that the medieval times normally had fountains (thanks to Disney Movies.) I'm sure most of you had thought the same.
Now, I know this is only a drawing, but I'm positive that the artist had tried his best to make it as accurate as possible. So any thoughts on the topic?


The babel tower in that picture is 2 kms long and you're wondering about pumps
#29
anyone who is interested in this stuff should read seven ancient wonders (or seven deadly wonders if ur american) by matthew reilly. Its an action book with lots of shooting and deadly boobie traps and history. Probably my favourite book ever.
#31
Quote by wiggyisgreat

That is also one of the ancient wonders of the world. I've always seen that as a load of crap Although that would be pretty awesome if that was real.

edit: And yeah I've seen pumps still today without electricity.


This one is real ...
There are records of the statue being broken up after some storm... not very very long ago (not this century... or the previous one but... not like 1000 year ago )
#32
theres other ways for a pump tro work besides electricity
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