#1
I can recognize intervals in a song if its played like at 1 not per second. which doesn't really help since most songs are faster. Is it really possible to listen to a fast solo and hear out every interval? I've heard people say they know exactly all the notes in a song just by hearing it once! But I don't anyone in real life like that.

So can anyone here do it? If so please tell me how!
#2
Yeah, if you have perfect pitch, it'd be pretty easy. However, most of us don't. If you practice intervals enough and practice listening to them in music, you can eventually be able to keep up with even fast songs.

Most people I know who can do that kind of thing have been first-rate musicians for years upon years, though.
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#5
I don't think you guys understand what I'm saying, I've already been using earmaster for 6 months. But even then it is still extremely hard to hear intervals in an actual song! Because you really only have a tenth a second to recognize it before the next note plays!
#6
Then get a program to slow down the tempo of the piece without changing the pitch.
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#8
Quote by scarlet20
I don't think you guys understand what I'm saying, I've already been using earmaster for 6 months. But even then it is still extremely hard to hear intervals in an actual song! Because you really only have a tenth a second to recognize it before the next note plays!



You have to begin transcribing now. Think of isolated interval practise (like Earmaster) like do a page of equations in math. Now, you have to apply it, which is just like the problem solving questions where you have to figure out who has how many apples or where the train is going to explode.

Find a song with a simple simple solo, or vocal melody, and try and find it on the guitar. The more you do it the more you get used to the sounds. Sometimes you may have to pause the song after every note, but your skills will begin improving soon.
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#9
It helps to recognise patterns, such as scale passages and arpeggios. If you hear three notes and can know by ear "that's a major triad first inversion," which is not unrealistic, it saves hearing each interval individually.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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#10
^Did you get my PM a few days ago? My computer has been techno-insanity lately.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#11
Sorry, I didn't get your PM. You could post it here, if you include it with some on topic advice so you don't have to warn yourself
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



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